Psychology, Developmental

UnderANDING

Author
J A T
Abstract
There is a documented need for caring education regarding patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) for nursing students and nursing staff. The autism spectrum population is increasing, one in 59 children in the United States as reported by the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network (as cited in Baio et al., 2018). Nurses are expected to provide appropriate care, showing respect and understanding at all times to both the client and family. Through lack of knowledge and misunderstanding the ASD population has not been given this care. Based on Watson’s Theory of Caring, an educational ASD caring program was created for a summer session Family Nurse Practitioner assessment class. This educational program provided basic knowledge of ASD and appropriate communication skills for caregivers, guided by caring science concepts. Using the Caring Factor Survey-Care Provider Version, Short Version (CFS-CPV) by Nelson, Thiel, Hozak, and Thomas (2016), and the Autism Knowledge Survey-Revised (AKS-R) by Swiezy, Stuart, and Ashby (2005), student perceived ability to care and student knowledge of ASD were measured. Nursing curriculums and continuing education offerings should include knowledge related to working with special populations, such as those with communication disorders. Nursing practice guided by caring science principles help nurses to build authentic relationships with patients and families resulting in better health outcomes. THIS WAS PLACED IN INCORRECT LOCATION. PLEASE DISMISS. Thank you.

Intergeneraltional preaching accounting for the various dynamics of multigenerational churches

Author
Duane L Flowler
Abstract
There are differences in listening comprehension at differing developmental stages of life. The differences exist between young children under about age 7, children from around 7 to 11, teenagers who have the adult tools for mature listening comprehension, and more mature adult listeners. This paper examines how preachers in intergenerational worship services preach intentionally to all generations without sacrificing the essentials of expository Christ-centered preaching. It also includes segments on pitfalls to avoid and suggestions for obtaining and using feedback. The hope is to help preachers preach the Word of God to reach everyone from the infant to the nonagenarian.

The perceived influence of Seventh-day Adventist religious tradition on clergy's ability to achieve balanced psychosocial development

Author
Vaughn K Grant
Abstract
This project seeks to assess the significant relationship between the Seventh-day Adventist tradition and the first seven crisis stages of Erik Erikson's model of psychosocial development. Participants who report a high score in one of Erikson's stages are expected to report a high score as a result of the influence of religious tradition, for that stage. The Seventh-day Adventist church has its own unique culture, traditions, conservative principles and philosophy that are grounded in the 28 fundamental beliefs of the church. This project sought to find correlations between religious tradition and Erikson's stages.

A study of spirituality in a liberal Christian context

Author
Barbara Wilkins-Crowder
Abstract
This doctor of ministry research project examines the relationship between personality, theology and spirituality. Research was conducted with members of a liberal Disciples of Christ congregation in Boulder, Colorado. Volunteers received spiritual genogram interviews designed to stimulate reflectivity about ego, spiritual and relationship needs. A subgroup also participated in twelve hours of support group work. Theories of object relations, transpersonal psychology and the theological framework of Paul Tillich were applied. The data provide a rich look at the characteristics of spirituality in a liberal environment. The analysis supports the thesis that spiritual growth and development are inextricably interwoven.

Guided life review of older parishioners

Author
Meredyth Bellows
Abstract
The project evolved from the question: "Does a systematic life review result in more positive feelings held by the elderly?" The Church can facilitate positive changes of perspectives on end of life issues with its aging parishioners through a narrative theology paradigm by reforming and re-authoring the events of their lives. the primary hypothesis was that through the guided life review, elderly parishioners experienced increased self-actualization. The hypothesis was proven to be measurable and correct. This was a functional change model based in Maslow's work on self-actualization, archetypal process of Jung and Hillman, and the eighth stage of human development of Erikson. Life review can be a valuable pastoral care tool for clergy in helping their elderly parishioners through issues of grief and loss.

Integrating service into high school education: an application of the impact of community service experience on personal development

Author
Maria Reimer Friesen
Abstract
In this qualitative study the author explores the research question: how does participation in community service affect personal and interpersonal development? Research data was gathered through personal interviews from six participants who were enrolled in an independent secondary school where participation in community service was a requirement for all students. The literature review includes research learning theories as well as a theological framework of service. The author concludes that service experience does influence personal development and that the particular service program of this study was perceived by the participants as having significant influence on their personal and interpersonal development.

Spiritual formation in the middle-adult years: a parish-based model

Author
Martha Means Blount
Abstract
This project proposes a comprehensive, threefold parish plan designed to help midlife people nurture faith as they reassess, rethink, and repurpose their lives. Based on the contributions of developmental psychology and biblical images of midlife spiritual formation, the plan offers a weekly class to study midlife characteristics, a small group to learn spiritual discipline, regular times to share faith stories, and intentional settings to offer acts of compassion. Works by Erik H Erikson, Daniel J Levinson, Carol Gilligan, and Jürgen Moltmann inform the project model.

The necessity for women's language when speaking with women: an exhortation

Author
Claire W Bamberg
Abstract
This project challenges the language that supports and creates the current cultural symbol system, documenting the neccessity of such a challenge. The project argues that prevailing language constructs function in ways that inhibit development of a healthy sense of self, especially for women. The white-maleness of American language powerfully shapes experience in the family, in society, in therapeutic settings, and in worship. Psychological analysis of self-development invites an assessment of the language used to describe human development. Theology calls for an examination of the language used to formulate its theories and its messages. This project calls for a change in the language base that shapes relationships to others, to God, and to the earth, in order to change societal consciousness and the way the world is organized.

Integrating Erik Erikson's psychosocial development theory with biblical story and vision: an alternative model for Bible study

Author
Harold J Mortimer
Abstract
This project proposes an alternative method of Bible study integrating psychology and theology. Using the structure and language of Erik H Erikson's psychosocial development model, the object relations insights of John McDargh, and the structural self-development theory of Robert Kegan, a group of six adults engages in an eight-week Bible study to explore ways in which selected biblical narratives interact with the dynamics of developmental psychology. Participants find that the Bible is a source of profound psychological insight and that faith development and self-development are inextricably linked.

Integration through reflection: a continuing care group process for former residents of a Christian center for healing

Author
Lea Boutin
Abstract
The author designed and facilitated a group reflection process to enable six former residents of a Christian therapeutic center to integrate their experience of change and discover how they can sustain further growth. Data was collected from individual interviews with the participants, their journals and evaluations, and group sessions with specific activities. Analysis revealed that participants experienced personal growth and integration as an ongoing process with six distinct phases, and that other persons play an important role in that process. The author also demonstrates that participants move through what Bernard Lonergan calls realms of meaning and conversion.
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