Psychology and religion

That They May Have Life: The Congregation's Opportunity to Strengthen Resiliency and Foster Wholeness Amid Trauma in the Lives of Volunteer First Responders

Author
Jason Cashing D.Min.
Abstract
With every emergency, first responders are exposed to a degree of traumatic stress. This Secondary Traumatic Stress can sap the life and purpose from first responders, and the accumulation of unaddressed STS can lead to burnout, unhealthy coping mechanisms, and even suicide. The congregation, though practices of Sabbath and Lament, can offer pathways to help mitigate STS and strengthen resilience. Looking at the invitation to Abundant Life in John 10, the Church’s calling and the world’s need intersect, providing a framework and a language to help first responders and congregations alike realize the fullness of Life offered to all.

Building up the church through healing and restoration focusing on Koinonia, Diakonia and psychological studies

Author
Seong Kook Lee
Abstract
In this paper, the author proceeds the project with the question of a healthy Church community. In chapter 1, he approaches the biblical understanding of the image of God. In chapter 2, he studies the recovery of the Church community through Koinonia, and Diakonia. In addition, he tries to change the inferiority complex that the church communities and individuals face into a sense of superiority by dealing with individual psychology of Adler. In the project, he appropriately applies and practices Koinonia, Diakonia, and individual psychology and the conclusion describes analysis of the project.

The Effect of a Spiritual Formation Program on Worry Reduction

Author
Scott A Hamilton
Abstract
The project was designed to help people reduce worry utilizing two spiritual formation practices: daily Bible reading and Praying the Ordinary. Teaching and training participants (twenty-five adult Christ-followers at Foundation Church, Sapulpa, Oklahoma) over a twelve-week period to pray and apply scriptures specifically addressing worry reduction and trusting in God throughout their day proved successful. Pre- and post program assessments showed significant positive change (3 of 5 sub-scales of the MCQ-30) with participants reducing worry and increasing trust in God.

Personality type and preaching

Author
Stephen D Watson
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to see if the Jungian personality dimension of Sensing significantly influenced the proclamation of the text of Scripture. The hypothesis of this project was that "Personality types, as defined by Jung and measured by the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, significantly influence the way a preacher presents the material from the biblical text in his sermons." The result of this project was that there was a significant difference between the way that the Sensing personality type and the Intuitive personality type preach. It was not possible to compare the Sensing personality type with either the Thinking or Feeling personality types in a significant way in this study.

Promoting emotional health with biblical wisdom

Author
Daniel W Son
Abstract
This project is designed to provide seminar messages on the topic of emotional health. Through this project I will answer the following questions: What are some theological perspectives on emotional health? What do medical studies say about the effects of human emotions on health and well-being? How do the seminar messages help the hearers of the Word enhance and promote emotional health after the messages are taught? The method of study includes biblical exegesis, literary research on medical findings, interview, survey, and workshops. The biblical messages on emotional health are relevant and practical to the participating audience regardless of age and gender.

The role of the local church in the maturation process during the transition from adolescence to adulthood

Author
Gordon David Boyd
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to examine the role of the church in the development of adolescents into adults. The extension of adolescence has received much attention, and there are indicators delayed development of adolescents significantly affects society in a number of ways: families, economies, educational institutions, and local churches. Data was collected through surveys and interviews with emerging adults. The project was organized around the three major tasks of adulthood: establishing autonomy, developing community, discovering vocation. A bridge can be built between emerging adults and church, if the church with intentionality becomes involved in the struggles they face.

Hurricane Katrina: scarred by tragedy / disaster / crisis / challenge, renewed by hope

Author
Wybra J Price
Abstract
We will all face tragedy, disaster, crisis, or challenge in life. The question is not if, but what will we do when we face such adversity? This project is written to assist those in the midst of and following these times of adversity. Family system tools are used to help people know themselves, circumstances, situations, and surroundings as well as finding a theological grounding in a hope for a new and different day. Life and faith are not determined by what happens in our lives but by how and what we do to respond to what happens in our lives.

A faith based, integrated recovery program: from addiction to new identity

Author
Ross Stanley Banister
Abstract
Addiction to substances and other behaviors is epidemic. The properly trained and prepared church is the perfect culture for recovery from addiction to occur. Assuming that "all truth is God's truth," this dissertation is designed to gather science that is compatible with scripture, and integrate as a theology of addiction and recovery. Neuroscience, as well as psychological and sociological truths, helps demonstrate the importance of the church in addressing this issue. The dissertation is multi-method: interdisciplinary, integrative (science and theology) and ethnographic (addict and recovery cultures). It is quantitative only in reporting research findings of others.

Searching for symptoms similar to those of a traumatic stress response in alienated church members

Author
James G Ivey
Abstract
Is it possible that alienated church members (who trace their alienation to a specific event) display symptoms of traumatic stress response due to religious worldviews violation? The author researched scripture, theological sources, and psychological sources related to church alienation and worldview violation. He interviewed sixteen people identified as alienated from church using criteria of PTSD to evaluate if the participants display evidence of traumatic stress response. Each participant showed evidence of traumatic stress response present from worldview violation connected with religious beliefs. The author concludes with possible benefits of further study in the area of spiritual trauma.

Uniquely part of Christ's body: equipping for personal and corporate spiritual nurture

Author
Nancy Graham Ogne
Abstract
Christians often experience frustration by embracing artificial, one-size-fits-all standards for spirituality. This project considers whether exploring one's God-designed uniqueness -- including one's personality, intelligences, spiritual type, and spiritual temperament -- can inform personal and corporate spiritual growth. The paper incorporates a qualitative research method to help adherents explore instinctive and counterintuitive approaches -- to affirm one's innate spiritual tendencies and intentionally stretch beyond them. Charting a "Journey Year," and weathering the seasons of it within community, participants are encouraged to express love for God with all the heart, mind, soul, and strength -- and to love neighbor as self.
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