Preaching

Preaching as sacramental presence: the word incarnate as proclamations toward healing in a faith community

Author
Marguerite Mims Rourk
Abstract
Preachers mediate God's word to God's people for understanding their context on the world through the word which imparts God's reconciliation and peace to the faith community. There are three supporting perspectives: 1) Dietrich Bonhoeffer: the church is Christ's presence in the world; preaching must convey the risen Christ present in the assembly. 2) Alexander Schmemann: preaching incarnates the word as a sacramental event revealing God's presence. 3) Richard Lischer: preachers must preach Jesus, not about him. Grounded in the unique message of Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection, Christian preaching partners with theology, as they are mutually supportive. Twenty-five sermons illustrate.

Preaching in a hopeful church

Author
Paul Leon Ramsey
Abstract
This project details the process of growing a preaching ministry in a church that seemed to be dying. The author shares his experience of preaching in a congregation that was learning to be hopeful after decades of discouragement and declining membership and participation. As hope and faithful purpose began to reshape Mayflower Congregational Church United Church of Christ in Englewood, Colorado, the author believed it was important to document this transformation and to describe some of the actions that were helping this hopeful process develop. The result of the study is one preacher's story, of one hopeful preaching ministry.

Between altar call and nothing at all: what is proper after preaching?

Author
Samuel N Goertz
Abstract
God's revelation invited a response. It is therefore legitimate and helpful for the preacher of God's Word to design response times that encourage the congregation to hear and obey the biblical truth being taught. In this study the author seeks to demonstrate that while there is freedom to create response times at the conclusion of a message, there are guidelines which need to be considered. These guidelines come from biblical teaching and examples, the past and present use of public response times, and the social and ethical concerns raised by the use of persuasive speech and public response.

Real preaching: how a preacher's ethos shapes an authentic sermon

Author
Douglas Allen Learned
Abstract
This thesis project, taken on in my role as the Executive Associate Pastor at the National Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., defines an authentic sermon as one in which listeners perceive dynamic congruence and continuity between four elements in preaching: 1) the Scripture passage, 2) the spoken message, 3) the character/personality of the preacher as presented in the sermon, 4) the character/personality of the preacher outside the sermon. Integration of these four elements constitutes an authentic sermon conveyed through preacher-�ethos.

Toward a more helpful preaching technique in the nursing home

Author
Keith W Schweitzer
Abstract
This Major Applied Project presents reminiscent preaching as a homiletical method to be used in a nursing home setting. As reminiscing is a common characteristic among the aged, applying it in the preaching ministry and worship activity among nursing home residents can serve the purpose of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in many helpful ways. This MAP explains and presents examples of how reminiscing from the past in the lives of the residents draws forth vivid memories in their minds. Used as a method in preaching, these memories can also strengthen and deepen the faith of the aged individual who is nearing eternity. Six sermons modeling this preaching method were written and delivered to the residents of the Greenfield Manor in Greenfield, Iowa, between May and October in 2005. Interviews with several residents of the Greenfield Manor and detailed reviews of the sermons are included in this document.

The "quest" in questions: a strategy for postmodern preaching

Author
Timothy E McLemore
Abstract
The work advocates a "questioning homiletic" as one approach to preaching in the context of postmodernity. This strategy can be incorporated into other contemporary homiletical approaches. It seeks, by the skillful employment of a guiding question (or questions), to challenge hearers to continued reflection even after the sermon has concluded, in hopes of encouraging an ongoing openness to God's Spirit.

Dramatic sketches in weekend messages to increase cognitive retention of the main point and suggested application

Author
John M Parlow
Abstract
A speaker needs to capture the attention of his or her listeners at the start. There are some distinct qualities of an effective introduction that encourage listeners to give serious attention to a presentation and relate to its message in a personal way. This researcher postulated that the use of enacted dramas in order to introduce messages would enhance the listener's/viewer's level of listening attention, translating into an enhanced retention of the message. The research process extended over three periods, making a total of twelve testing weekends, and was conducted in De Pere, Wisconsin. This researcher concludes that enacted drama does enhance retention of the message.

The impact of visual aids on memory in preaching

Author
Curtis L Deterding
Abstract
Are hearers able to better retain what they have heard preached if visual aids are used? This is the central question answered by this thesis. A primary presupposition of this project is that when we involve the use of sight during the sermon event, our ability to remember what was said increases. In this study, the theoretical and theological analysis of remembering and memory are discussed in connection with the use of visuals for retention. Those who participated in the project as hearers were asked to evaluate some sermons that used visual aids and some that did not. Based on the answers given some conclusions can be drawn to demonstrate that the use of visual aids can have a significant impact on the memory of the hearers.

Renewing a missional identity by preaching on the Kingdom of God

Author
Claude R Alexander
Abstract
The Kingdom of God should be the focus of every believer and every church. It provides the greatest purpose and mission for the Christian life. This mission is not found in a program or a strategy of a denomination, but in the biblical teaching found in both the Old and New Testaments. A missional renewal is sought through preaching that seeks to inform, comfort and motivate believers to be participants in the Kingdom of God.
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