Preaching

Women of the Bible tell the story of salvation from behind the scenes

Author
Mary Elizabeth Invig
Abstract
This project defends the use of dramatic monologue as an effective public teaching tool for women to tell the story of salvation through Bible women who lived behind the scenes. It offers preachers an alternate method to teach the redemption story so that biblical, theological and historical lessons are learned. The author researched listener's response to the dramatic presentation, proving that when dramatic monologue is used by the women of Scripture to teach single events, the chronological story of redemption, or individual Bible stories, listeners are sufficiently informed of the timeless truths of redemption and motivated to life change.

Enabling the preacher: the impact of spiritual formation on those who preach

Author
Brian K Jensen
Abstract
The formation of the people of God is vital for pastors. I believe preaching can facilitate this formation. yet in order for the people of God to be formed, I believe the preachers must be formed. What impact does the intentional spiritual formation of P.C. (U.S.A.) preachers in northeast Ohio have on their preaching? Specifically, if they are better able to discern God's activity and will, will their preaching be more effective? I will conduct a faith formation experiment with a group of ministers and evaluate their preaching in an effort to determine if intentional spiritual formation impacts their preaching.

Cor ad cor loquitur: heart to heart--preaching that moves

Author
Claudius Zuber
Abstract
What happens to the listener when the preacher starts to share where the Word of God touched his life rather than using arguments to persuade? This thesis follows the journey of the author who practiced judicious self-disclosure and emotional engagement by exploring different dimensions of the "new homiletics". It encourages preachers to preach from the heart because they touch the heart of the hearers in such a way that they are moved and that congregations are transformed.

Interrelatedness and ambiguity: preaching in the midst of everyday life

Author
Carina Elisabeth Sundberg
Abstract
The author researched the issue of preaching from a theology that is close to the hearth, able to reveal the presence of God in that which is deeply human and seeks to confront "interrelatedness" and "right relation" between God, human beings and creation without simplifying the ambiguities of everyday life. She used the Theological Worlds described by Paul W. Jones as an instrument for contextual analysis. The feminist theologian Mary Grey expressed a theology that proved to be both confirming and challenging to the author and her congregation. The sermons became parts in an open ended dialogue about life and life-giving theology.

Servant leader, servant preacher

Author
Donala L DeWolfe
Abstract
The model of leadership exemplified by the position of the preacher in the Reformed tradition can be called "singular leadership." This model has survived in the church long after its demise in western culture. A new model, "servant leadership," is more appropriate in the church at the turn of the twenty-first century. From servant leadership a model of servant preaching can be developed. Servant preaching reflects a contemporary homiletic that emphasizes partnership between preacher and congregation, and fosters a relationship of trust in which a preacher's leadership is established. The model of partnership between preacher and people is built on the author's experience with the Parish Project Group, in dialogue with the work of four homileticians.

Partners in the gospel: engaging the congregation in worship and preaching through study of the scripture

Author
Elizabeth Francis Caldwell
Abstract
The single most important component of worship preparation is often the one that is overlooked: the study of the scripture that is the foundation of the sermon. If the laity is engaged in intentional study of the scripture text prior to hearing it read and preached in worship, they are more likely to remember the text and sermon and to apply both to their daily lives. This thesis provides a practical method for the consistent study of the scripture text used in worship. By utilizing the Scripture Journals which are the foundation of this project, individuals and groups are given a viable opportunity to be involved in the both the study and practical application of the scripture text. This involvement promotes a genuine collaboration between preacher and congregation, which leads to a revitalization of preaching and worship.

"Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street": the recovery of the orality of preaching in an electronic age

Author
Bruce A Kuenzel
Abstract
Innovations in media have altered the way in which words are conceived, retrieved, received, and even believed. We are now preaching to a generation of "Sesame Street kids," whose preferred medium is the screen. Literate preachers are being forced to become more "electronic". Electronic preaching does not mean subsutituting electronic media for human speech, but embodying the Word as thoroughly as possible--in the preacher, the listeners, and the biblical characters. Embodied preaching seizes on the unique strength of human speech, namely, its particularity, and seeks to recover the dynamics of the ancient, oral rhetorical tradition: speech that is from the heart, face to face, down to earth, and of the moment.

Preaching for the household of God: a homiletic that speaks to mixed generations

Author
Susan Pizor Yoder
Abstract
This thesis explores methods the modern preacher might incorporate in sermons in order to effectively reach the whole household of God's people gathered. Particularly studies were the Builder, Boomer, and Buster generations. Communication theory and technological advances that have affected these generations were also reviewed. New homiletic methods, particularly of Craddock, Lowry, Buttrick, Mitchell, and McClure are applied. How do we preach the truth of Jesus Christ when these three generations have all come to understand truth quite differently? This project constructed and tested sermons based on the data acquired with varied congregations and generations recording the outcome.

The Proclamational Leader A Seminar for Working Pastors

Author
John Currie
Abstract
This project proposes that a substantial cause of ineffectual preaching stems from the failure to integrate the essential pastoral functions of preaching and leadership in pastoral practice. The project seeks to address the problem by presenting a seminar that equips pastors to integrate best practices in preaching and leadership. To ascertain these practices the author studied the biblical and theological foundations of preaching and leadership and historic and contemporary voices in the tradition of Reformed Presbyterianism and Westminster Theological Seminary. The results of the study are presented as perspectives essential to the preacher-leader's identity and best practices in both preaching and leadership.
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