Preaching, Exegetical

Preaching About Biblical Marriage: An Evaluation of Functional Elements in Martyn Lloyd-Jones's Sermons on Ephesians 5:22-33 as Contained in the Book Christian Marriage and Its Implications for Modern Preachers

Author
Keith Wayne Hamilton D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this historical and biographical analysis was to understand the life and ministry of Martyn Lloyd-Jones and to draw implications from this understanding for contemporary pastors more faithfully to preach biblically concerning marriage. The overall ministry philosophy and methodology of Lloyd-Jones have been considered along with his value for biblical authority, expository preaching, and biblical marriage. This purpose was accomplished through qualitative research using content analysis on primary and secondary sources by and about Martyn Lloyd-Jones to understand what he believed about Christian preaching and ministry and to know how he applied that understanding personally and in the pulpit.

The research design for this study followed a qualitative approach to studying data. The study also implemented content analysis when examining individual sermons Lloyd-Jones preached from Ephesians 5:22-33 contained in Christian Marriage: From Basic Principles to Transformed Relationships. These sermons were evaluated according to the functional elements of explanation, illustration, and application to derive implications for pastors today.

The research is developed into three parts. First, in chapters 1-2, the thesis and life of Lloyd-Jones is described. Second, in chapters 3-4, his value for biblical expository preaching is established. Third, chapters 5-6 set forth the evaluating methodology for the eleven sermons. Fourth, chapter 7 validated the thesis by offering the analysis of data and research conclusions, along with further suggestions.

Preaching Beyond the Hedges: A Psycho-Social and Spiritual Exegesis of University Students as a Resource for the Campus Preacher

Author
RAYMOND C COOK D.Min.
Abstract
Community exegesis is gaining interest among preachers as a means to communicate the Word of God to a particular group, time, and location. The work of Lenora Tubbs Tisdale and her study of communal exegesis marks a significant influence on this interest. The Second Vatican Council also calls upon the preacher to utilize language to tailor the Word of God for the listener. Relying on the study of social location and combining that effort with psychological, social, and spiritual disciplines, preachers engage concepts that aid in the exegesis of today’s university students. This study demonstrates that exegeting the Scriptures and the community is beneficial to the psycho-spiritual cognitive development of students.
This thesis examines disciplines that equip preachers to exegete the university student community, thereby contributing to a better preaching event. To that end, the first chapter describes the importance of studying the historical and observable social location in which the students are living. The second chapter treats psychological stage development and current struggles that today’s undergraduates are experiencing. The third chapter considers two specific research methods and ways that preachers might implement them. These research methods uncover the language of university students, as reflected in conversations with focus groups. The fourth chapter examines the fruits of Emmaus Walks that lead towards Paschal Preaching, and the witness that university students give when preaching moves into action. The preacher also calls to mind the role of the Holy Spirit in creating a preaching event. The conclusion highlights the benefits of this thesis as an exegetical resource, suggesting that preachers can preach more effectively to students on their campuses by gaining knowledge of the social location, updating their understanding of proposed theories of psychological stage development, using a variety of research methods, and intentionally journeying with the students.

LET THE ANCIENT STORIES LIVE: USING NARRATIVE ANALYSIS AND A CHRIST-CENTERED HERMENEUTIC FOR PREACHING OLD TESTAMENT NARRATIVES

Author
Mark Pluimer D.Min.
Abstract
This project sought to increase the competence of preachers and Bible teachers to preach or teach from Old Testament narratives in a way that is both Christ-centered and faithful to the original intent of the narrative. To achieve this goal, the project explored mainly two key topics: narrative analysis and a Christ-centered hermeneutic. Guided by the principles and tools of narrative analysis, preachers and Bible teachers are able to discern the main message of narratives as originally intended by the biblical author. Guided by the principles and tools of a Christ-centered hermeneutic, preachers and Bible teachers are able to connect the message of narratives to Christ authentically, without distorting or violating the original intent of the narrative. These considerations of narrative analysis and a Christ-centered hermeneutic culminated in a working three-step method for handling Old Testament narratives faithfully in preaching or teaching.

The project implemented the proposed principles by developing a manual, the content of which was taught in a twelve-hour course to a group of preachers and Bible teachers. Pre-course competence was assessed and compared to post-course competence by means of a focus group, surveys, a course evaluation, and written work on assigned Old Testament narrative texts.

The results showed a demonstrable increase in competence among participants. The principles and tools presented in the manual/course were shown to be valuable for helping preachers and Bible teachers to preach or teach from Old Testament narratives in a way that is both Christ-centered and faithful to the original intent of the narrative.

Proclaiming the gospel from Old Testament war narratives

Author
Eli H. Dowell
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine how preachers proclaim the Gospel from Old Testament war narratives. The study utilized a basic qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with six Gospel-centered preachers. Four research questions guided the data analysis, addressing challenges presented by culture and theology and what methods preachers use to overcome these challenges. The findings of the study show that Old Testament war narratives are essential components of the meta-narrative of Scripture, culminating in the person and work of Jesus Christ. The study concluded with several examples of Gospel-centered interpretations of select passages from the book of Joshua.

A STUDY OF SERMON APPLICATION ACROSS BIBLICAL GENRES AT FAITH BIBLE CHURCH

Author
Trevor Nunn D.Min.
Abstract
This project developed strategies to sermon application across the biblical genres of poetry, narrative, parables and epistles. The strategies had two goals: (1) enhance the congregants’ biblical understanding of the text while growing them in Christ; (2) improve the quality of sermon applications in the project writer’s preaching. To achieve these goals, this project reviewed hermeneutical topics to create a definition of expository preaching. Based on the definition, a questionnaire evaluated the success of the strategies through a pre/post format of the project writer’s sermons. Conclusions to their success were based upon positive or negative changes within the data.


An Analysis of the Warning Passages of Hebrews with a View to the Development of Text-Driven Sermons

Author
Cecil S Powers
Abstract
Chapter 1 introduces the thesis and plan of development while keeping in mind anticipated theological issues to be addressed along with stated goals of the overall dissertation. Chapters 2 through 6 contain an exegetical and structural analysis of each warning passage followed by hermeneutic and homiletic considerations, a sermon manuscript, and concludes with a summary analysis of the four major interpretive viewpoints of the warning. Chapter 7 provides a summary and conclusion concerning the exegetical and structure analysis of the warning passages in Hebrews as it relates to their conduciveness toward the development of text driven sermons for the purpose of promoting spiritual maturity in a local church.

Do you hear what I hear? Analyzing laity responses

Author
Gary L Hughes
Abstract
Do people hear many different relevant messages from the same text? The author used ethnographic research methods. This included surveys of clergy and taped responses of laity. There were eight lay persons and seven clergy that took part in this study. The author used to text in the gospel of Mark. We examined Mark 1:9-20 and Mark 16: 1-8.I listened to the responses of laity and the clergy. I then analysed each response. After the author reflected on the laity responses. I then preached both texts in two small contexts, the church and the mission in which I work.The author's conclusion is that people hear many different messages from the same text. Mark Allan Powell writes in his book, What shall they Hear? that "in the moment of hearing a the text preached and read the listener has the power to choose what to do with our words." Again, the author's research supports the small study that people take away different meanings based on race, economic status, religious affiliation and gender.

Jesus Sat Down: Preaching Grace as Motivation Toward Redemptive Change

Author
Jon D Wymer
Abstract
Congregations sometimes fall short of making personal change and working for social change within their communities as robustly as their preachers think they should. Preaching grace can lead congregations, even those that may be theologically conservative, to be motivated as individuals and corporately to experience the type of transformation that comes from God which is representative of redemptive change. This work offers a model of preaching as the proclamation of good news that offers divine grace as the source of redemptive change in individuals and the community.

A Study of Contextual Expository Preaching

Author
Joseph Ping Ho
Abstract
This dissertation will demonstrate that contextual expository preaching is the most appropriate preaching method in today's churches. It consists of four components: To research and define various terminologies associated to contextual expository preaching. To research and explain three foundational requirements for contextual expository preachers: knowing the congregation, ability to interpret society, and understanding the relationship between imagination and contextualization. To research and design a step by step guide to prepare a contextual expository sermon. To utilize the guide to prepare a sermon series using the Book of Habakkuk to demonstrate and affirm the efficacy and design of the guide.

Implementing a theme-based approach for text-driven preaching: Matthew's gospel a test case

Author
Gary Henry Everett
Abstract
This dissertation offers a theme-based approach for crafting exegetical studies into a cohesive, text-driven, expository sermon series. Such cohesion enables the preacher to avoid the danger of fragmentation. The gospel of Matthew is chosen as a test case to demonstrate how a theme-based approach to the Scriptures facilitates the identification of a book's literary structure and central ideas of the text. This approach to the biblical text reveals Matthew's theological framework. Because this framework exposes the central ideas of a book's literary structure, it aids in sermon preparation. This approach bridges the gap between exegesis and homiletics.
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