Preaching, African American

EXPOUNDING ROMANS 6-8 TO ADVANCE GREAT COMMISSION OBEDIENCE IN THE LEADERSHIP AT MAYFIELD MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, FORT WORTH, TEXAS

Author
Larry Hall D.Min.
Abstract
The writer is the pastor of a Missionary Baptist congregation. In a self-appraisal survey, congregational leaders ranked Great Commission obedience low among ministry priorities. This project investigated the question: Can a pastoral approach in expounding Romans 6-8 be effective in developing a Great Commission theology and in advancing Great Commission obedience for select leaders at Mayfield Missionary Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas. The project pursues two goals: 1) to develop the theology of the participants and 2) to develop pastoral preaching effectiveness.
The research design combined both the qualitative and quantitative method. The writer designed seven sermons from Romans 6-8 in a series entitled Gospel Assurance, a Motivation to Great Commission Obedience. The writer expounded selected doctrinal themes from the Biblical text to develop elements of a Great Commission theology in the participants. Using a pastoral approach, the writer selected eight congregational leaders to participate in a small group to give feedback on the preaching effectiveness. In addition, the participants completed a pre and post project questionnaire to indicate theological understanding, opinion surveys, and interviews. The writer assessed the participants’ awareness, attitudes and actions in relation to the Matthew 28:18-20 mandate to make disciples.
The writer diagnosed the participants’ gain in theological understanding and simultaneously increased pastoral preaching effectiveness through small group feedback. The writer and participants advanced toward Great Commission obedience.

Preaching for prophetic witness: inspiring a black middle-class congregation to engage its marginalized community

Author
Richard D Shaw
Abstract
Following the Civil Rights movements of the sixties, many Black preachers turned their away from prophetic preaching, and despite the critical need, chose not to preach sermons addressing social injustice during Sunday morning worship services. As a result, the Black church, in many cases, has become irrelevant on social issues that affect the communities where they are located. This thesis project addresses the requirements for preaching prophetically during Sunday morning worship to a Black, middle-class congregation, and aims to show that preaching for prophetic witness can be used as a means of inspiring a congregation that identifies itself as Black middle-class to reach out fully to its marginalized community.

iHomiletic: Preaching that Clicks

Author
Dominique A Robinson
Abstract
Like many other churches the absence of youth and young adults is painstakingly obvious in the Black Church, and I contend that a unique homiletical approach that incorporates preaching and social media and offers hope can re-engage Black Millennials to the Gospel and the Black Church in creative and compelling ways. This unique and new approach is iHomiletic.

Preaching as Pastoral Care Utilizing the Tenets of Pastoral Care and Counseling to Influence Sermon Development

Author
James R Johnson
Abstract
This thesis project focuses on preaching as pastoral care and the process of integration. In the Black church context, it is taboo for one to seek counseling outside of the realm of the church. People who face issues such as mental illness and poverty are often stigmatized and labeled. The perpetuation of such stigmas is often introduced and reinforced through the preaching of the gospel. It is the effort of the writer to show through contextual practice how the integration of preaching and pastoral care challenges the church to rethink preaching as a means of healing care.

New life for small churches

Author
Laverne Witherspoon
Abstract
The central theme of this project is grounded in the assumption that prophetic preaching forms a Christian body with a prophetic consciousness and identity. In order for preaching to be profoundly transformational in the shaping of a faith community's identity, the prophetic preacher must recover an eschatological awareness and urgency. The goal of this project is to explore the matter at hand form the rich African American preaching tradition which has been a conduit of life to a community encircled by life-negating forces.

Advancing congregational discipleship through extended sermon conversations as reimagines call and response

Author
Martin Childs
Abstract
Call and response between the preacher and the congregation is a common feature in many African American churches. In this project, the author proposes that reimagining call and response in preaching as an ongoing sermon conversation advances discipleship in the congregation. The congregation begins the dialogue with the preacher prior to the development of the sermon; participates in traditional call and response during the sermon, and continues the conversation after the sermon is preached. Consequently, the depth of these conversations helps to advance the congregation in the area of discipleship.

Using emerging church principles to enhance Black preaching

Author
Derik E Jones
Abstract
There is a generational shift in the 21st century African American church. Young Black adults are not just looking for sound biblical preaching; rather, they are in search of sound biblical preaching that is both creative and grounded in practical wisdom. How can Emergent Church preaching inform Black preaching? Four sermons by four preachers were analyzed using Haddon Robinson's analysis. Then three Black pastors of Richmond, Virginia, were interviewed to receive feedback. Results showed that RC preaching could be adapted to Black preaching.

The church as the surrogate family

Author
Roberta Edwards Mills
Abstract
This practical theology model was developed to nurture black youth and counteract the effects of poverty, racism, and nihilism in the church. The setting was Oak Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Seven theme sermons on the attributes of God were provided to provide a spiritual foundation for the church family. Seven African style intergenerational Bible studies were created to facilitate the healing, sustaining, guiding, and reconciling of Jesus within the church family. The implementation of this holistic model over seven months from June through December of 2010 resulted in enhanced confidence, spiritual growth, and maturity among the youth.

Church and society: a model to build bridges using charity, justice, and advocacy to create an effective church

Author
Oscar L Varnadoe
Abstract
The model is designed to engage church in society in ways which create a more effective church. Through qualitative research and considering the ministries of two illustrious, great African-American preachers, the dissertation demonstrates that congregational involement in society increases church effectivness,regardless of whether the style of ministry is priestly, as with Dr. J.H. Jackson, or prophetic, as was that of Dr. Martain Luther King, Jr. The creation of an effective church in its fullness is, of course, a long-term assessment. Although the church studied was resurrected,more time is needed for conclusive findings.
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