Pastoral counseling

Discovering Counseling Methods That Military Chaplains Can Use To Increase Spiritual Resilience

Author
Philip E. Ridley D.Min.
Abstract
The research conducted in this project revealed most military chaplains possess innate skills that are valuable to counseling. Combining these skills with proven counseling methods increase service members’ spiritual resilience. Military chaplains’ empathy and the ability to actively listen to care-seekers is one such innate skill. Empathetic listening builds rapport and creates a safe client-focused environment. Within this safe environment, military chaplains can encourage service members with spiritual or practical wisdom. Additionally, military chaplains can provide assurance and peace through prayer, reading of sacred documents, or administering religious rites. These religious activities connect the care-seeker to their source of faith. Military chaplains’ ability to incorporate the aforementioned skills and capabilities into their counseling methods create a safe client-centered counseling environment. This type of environment is an essential element for implementing the narrative therapy counseling method. Incorporation of narrative therapy into military chaplains counseling sessions can increase service members’ spiritual resilience. The narrative therapy method is conducive for military chaplains to use because it is the least technical or scientific counseling method implemented by behavioral health counselors. Narrative therapy provides a structure that empowers the caregiver, including military chaplains to help care-seekers share, understand, and reshape their narrative or personal story.

Helping People to Experience Spiritual Healing of Painful Life Experiences

Author
Brian Smilde D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry Major Project was intended to assess the extent to which people experience spiritual healing of past wounds through a series of small group gatherings focused on teaching and experiencing the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ.

The project began with identifying the biblical and theological foundation for Jesus healing people from their wounds—not only physical but also emotional or spiritual. Then examining what people in other disciplines—such as social science, counseling, and business—also think, believe and teach about healing or restoration from past wounds.

The intervention involved a small group of six participants experiencing a series of eight small group gatherings. They filled out a Pre-Group and Post-Group Questionnaire. After five small group gatherings of teaching, experiencing and praying, there were two Focus Groups which allowed the participants to share feedback about what they learned, experienced and thought.

The data from the two Questionnaires and the Focus Groups was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of these small group gatherings to lead participants toward the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ. The result of this analysis was that participants were helped to identify past wounds or traumas, they felt safe to share honestly and vulnerably with the other group participants, they felt that others responded with grace and empathy, and they reflectively and personally applied the teaching in ways that allowed them to experience Jesus release them from past pain.

An exploration of the use of moral injury by senior chaplains in their role as advisors to commanders at the operational and strategic level

Author
Shaun Donald Yaskiw
Abstract
Senior military leaders have a special responsibility for the well-being of those under their command - including their spiritual well-being. Moral injury has the potential to significantly corrode the well-being of military personnel, those who lead them, and the institution. Military chaplains have a unique advisory role to play in helping military leaders care for the spiritual well-being of their personnel. Senior military chaplains have the additional opportunity to help senior military leaders shape the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) so as to seek to prevent moral injury, reduce its incidence, and mitigate its effects when it occurs.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Religious support in special operations

Author
Kelly L. O'Lear
Abstract
The author, a six-year veteran of the Special Operations community, researched the religious support needs of the United States Special Operations community and their dependents. This was accomplished by collecting and analyzing data within the author's unit as well as data made available by the United States Special Operations Command. The analysis provided recommendations for Religious support Teams in identifying the religious and spiritual needs of the Special Operations community in addition to how Religious Support Teams can adapt to the Special Operations culture.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Caring for warriors : ministry to remotely piloted aircrew, moral injury and just war

Author
Joel D. Kornegay
Abstract
The objective of this project was to create training materials for Air Force chaplains serving the remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) community focusing on caring for individuals dealing with moral injury. The author interviewed pilots and sensor operators to assess their moral, ethical and religious perspectives on war and killing. Additionally, the author interviewed psychologists and an ethicist with experience in the RPA community. These interviews, along with extensive study of scholarly works, enabled the author to develop a training curriculum for chaplains as well as a briefing for RPA aircrew to effectively care for warriors wrestling with moral injury.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Ellsworth Human Performance Team : utilizing Jesus' sending of the disciples to better care for airmen

Author
Ronald L. Feeser Jr.
Abstract
This paper researched the applicability of Jesus' method of sending disciples out in pairs to the outreach utilized by Helping Agencies in the United States Air Force. The author examined the theology and practicality of establishing a local Human Performance Team. This construct changed the outreach to better reach and care for Airmen. Analysis suggests that this method positively affected the ability of agencies to support members and be responsive to crises. Additionally, it indicates that the application of this model has a positive effect on the community by reducing the overall number of crisis and emergency counseling sessions.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Meditation and Contemplation: Framework for a Coping Mechanism Among Small Groups at the Mount Moriah Baptist Church in Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
Gary W. Jordan
Abstract
“Don’t say God is silent if your Bible is closed.” - Church Sign This project aimed to encourage and enable a small group class at Mount Moriah Baptist Church to adopt meditative and contemplative prayer as a framework for a coping mechanism. In practicing this type of prayer life, participants anticipated to receive the benefit of being better able to cope with stressors of life. Utilizing a small group study, Lectio Divina, biblical examples, breathing techniques and various surveys, participants were enabled to experience a deeper interaction with Scripture, aided by the ministry of the Holy Spirit, to hear God speaking to them and transforming their lives to the image of Christ.

Practicing Sabbath to Reduce Stress Among Ministers in the Tyger River Baptist Association, Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
James Hailstock
Abstract
The Sabbath is the zenith of God’s creation and the climax of living. The key to reducing stress among ministers is the Sabbath lifestyle which includes practicing the disciplines of prayer, silence, feasting and fellowshipping in addition to identifying the signs and symptoms of stress. The Sabbath lifestyle empowers ministers with coping skills that can be personalized and implemented consistently as they progress and deal with the daunting demands and responsibilities of ministry. This project tested and compared the stress levels of the research and control groups before and after teaching four courses (disciplines) in the context of a Sabbath lifestyle to the research group only. During the retreat, four activities relative to the four courses were practiced by the research and control groups to determine if the courses had an impact on the activities to reduce stress among ministers. The project also revealed the effectiveness of the instructor, research site, courses, retreat, and activities. The project revealed strengths, weaknesses, and missteps. The results established that the courses did influence the activities to reduce stress among ministers.

Changing Attitudes Toward Life : Using Viktor E. Frankl's Logotherapy in Ministry with Christian Women in Church of the Lord, Anyang, Kyounggi-do, South Korea

Author
Jihye Kim
Abstract
Changing Attitudes Toward Life: Using Viktor E. Frankl’s Logotherapy in Ministry with Christian Women in Church of the Lord, Anyang, Kyounggi-do, South Korea is a project designed to help the target group increase the degree of meaning and purpose in life and motivate a desire to live lives more meaningfully and responsibly with hopeful attitudes by exploring the biblical messages with integration exercises utilizing the key concepts of Dr. Frankl’s Logotherapy. Through a five-week sermon series, six weeks of group sessions including the final group reflection session, and writing reflection and autobiographies, the participants are provided opportunities to evaluate and even revise their values, meaning, and life-styles. Using quantitative and qualitative instruments, results show that educative pastoral counseling along with reflection in a small group setting can effect significant positive changes in their attitudes and behavior.

An Experiment in Civil Dialogue in a Clinical Pastoral Education Group at Caromont Regional Medical Center, Gastonia, North Carolina

Author
Stephen Allen Lemons
Abstract
An Experiment in Civil Dialogue... was designed to create a setting for civil dialogue concerning homosexuality and Christian faith. The seven-week process involved eight daylong sessions with eight Clinical Pastoral Education students. Sessions focused on a study of biblical passages regarding homosexuality. Passages were examined from a traditional and progressive viewpoint. Six guests presented from a traditional or progressive viewpoint. Participants wrote verbatims and theological integration papers focusing on pastoral care to LGBT persons/families. Research methods included focus and control group and quantitative-qualitative research. Interviews, surveys and written reflections attest that the group maintained civil dialogue throughout the process. The group came to better understand and appreciate those who held views on homosexuality that were different from their own. The participants recommended using a similar form of group process in churches.
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