Pastoral counseling

HELPING CHURCH MEMBERS UNDERSTAND AND BIBLICALLY RESPOND TO DEPRESSION

Author
Akintoye Jeremiah Akintunde Rev. D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
HELPING CHURCH MEMBERS UNDERSTAND AND BIBLICALLY RESPOND TO DEPRESSION
People often disregard the fact that the spiritual state of mind is greatly affected by what is happening in the physical. At times, depression results from exhaustion, anxiety, worry, and many bottled-up issues in people’s lives. People are depressed because they are unfulfilled in their careers, marital life, education, and plans. Unconfessed sin and wickedness of hearts can be the root cause of some depressive moods. When daily challenges become overwhelming and frustrating, people are spiritually drained and discouraged. What is needed for any individual struggling with a depressive mood is the Word of God through biblical counseling. Biblical counselors offer a compassionate heart and practical help through the biblical principles applied to the counselee’s life and situation.
Christians (church members) are not immune from depression because it is real and can be overcome and conquered through reliance on the Holy Spirit and appropriate biblical principles. Biblical counselors should always keep in mind a holistic perspective of human nature. God created human beings holistically – body, spirit, and soul. When one part suffers, every other part suffers with it. Psychology, philosophy, and psychoanalysis (or psychotherapy) are human theories and philosophies that can only last for a short time. The Word of God (Scripture) is authentic, inspired, inerrant, sufficient, and authoritative for counseling tasks and is superior to anything the world’s wisdom offers. The Scripture has the power to change life and turn around situations.
Regardless of the latest scientific discovery, research, and methodology, medical professionals still believe, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), that ‘mental disorders’ including depression fall into such “diagnostic criteria” with a collection of symptoms known as syndromes. A syndrome is simply a collection of symptoms that a person is experiencing.

DEVELOPING A WORKSHOP TO ENCOURAGE THE ORDINATION OF PASTORAL CLINICIANS IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Author
In Gyu Chang
Abstract
This project is to remind both medicine and Christianity of the urgent need for the reunification of the separated spirituality and medicine in the era of the fourth industrial revolution. This recommendation is based on both scientific research and biblical teachings. Many studies have shown that the majority of patients are suffering from spiritual distress, and this distress is not being properly addressed by medicine or Christianity. According to the scientific studies and the teachings of the Bible, a holistic biopsychosocial spiritual (BPSS) strategy is necessary to best treat patients. There are two approaches to develop a BPSS strategy: (1) short term, which would involve training of all clinicians in addressing spiritual distress, and (2) long term, which would develop pastoral clinicians (PCs) to integrate medicine and spirituality. The latter approach is the focus of my dissertation.

Enhancing the chaplain's role in support of suicide prevention efforts : an active duty army battalion chaplain's pursuit of saving soldiers' lives

Author
Christopher J. Washburn
Abstract
"Chaplains bear the weight of Soldier welfare and care alongside their religious support mission. Without requiring new regulations or major overhauls in chaplain functionality, this author contends that through intentionally leveraging one's duties, an active duty Army chaplain might significantly augment the existing program of suicide prevention in a way that results in saving lives - for Soldiers to utilize chaplain support. This project explored three potential avenues of attack: chaplain integration training, expanded spiritual fitness events, and identification of barriers. Initial analysis suggests that such life-saving focused efforts have a positive impact upon building connection and fostering help-seeking behaviors." -- Leaf [2].

Developing a coaching model of ministry to mitigate moral drift in Special Operations

Author
Pete Stone
Abstract
"Soldiers serving in Special Operations Forces (SOF) live under enormous pressures to perform at the highest levels while sustaining a high, relentless operational tempo. Unless they remain grounded in an identity gives them meaning apart from their SOF profession, that pressure can more easily erode personal values, cause moral drift, and lead to unintended consequences. Chaplains serving in SOF must find effective ways to help mitigate this risk and support a flourishing life. The author received training in a Christian-based personal coaching program and implemented that coaching model with a test sample of five Soldiers serving in SOF to mitigate that risk. The author measured the effectiveness of the coaching process with direct observation, interviews and surveys, and determined that personal coaching effectively reduced the risk of moral drift in the subjects. The author concluded that the coaching model provides an effective way for chaplains serving in SOF to help Soldiers remain grounded in their identity outside of the SOF profession by helping them clarify their values, determine their priorities, and design actions that will align them with that identity. Personal coaching is an effective ministry tool chaplain can use to mitigate the risk of moral drift and support a flourishing life in the lives of their Soldiers." -- Leaf [2].

Restorative rest : sounding the alarm on a culture of excess

Author
Joseph D. Sherwin
Abstract
"The author explores the impact of restorative rest on medical staff at Brooke Army Medical Center and the Cadre of the 264th Medical Battalion in San Antonio, TX. He sought to determine the efficacy of restorative rest techniques and tools in alleviating sleep deprivation and fatigue. By teaching the value of restorative rest as revealed through the Sabbath, the author intends to examine its effects on promoting greater levels of readiness and resiliency among Cadre and Staff. The author further intends to use the data derived from this study as a means of developing a tool that will be used to inform Commanders regarding the dangers of sleep deprivation within their ranks and how proper Sabbath practices and restorative rest might make for a more ready and resilient fighting force." -- Leaf [2].

Ministry of presence in the absence : the art of providing pastoral care across multiple deployed spaces

Author
Azande M. Sasa
Abstract
"Ministry of presence forms the heart of the chaplain's ministerial role. Yet how does ministry of presence manifest when the chaplain is estranged from or does not have physical access to their service members? This project explored the question of ministry of presence among chaplains in highly dispersed and secure Military Intelligence units within the context of a Unitarian Universalist historico-theological framework. The research methodologies for the author's data corpus included: ethnographic research, questionnaires, focus group discussions, and expert and informal interviews. She then analyzed the results in order to glean a better understanding of the applicability of ministry of presence across multiple deployed spaces. The findings suggest that flexibility and an expanded notion of presence as interconnection, presence within, and presence as creativity, lead to greater fulfillment in performing and providing religious and spiritual support for one's deployed personnel." -- Leaf [2].

Moral injury : a chaplain pre-emptive training to mitigate the longevity of moral injury results through community, training, and spiritual resilience

Author
Gary D. Sands
Abstract
"The problem proposed for this study assumes there is little or no pre-emptive Moral Injury training in the Army; and that pre-emptive Moral Injury training aids in processing through Moral Injury. This project developed a Moral Injury healing training plan; and from this plan further developed a pre-emptive Moral Injury training program. The author utilized a premade survey to discover Moral Injury in Soldier participants. The results of this survey were tallied and processed using Spearman's Rho statistic. The data demonstrated strong areas in which Soldiers needed special attention. This attention is the focus of the healing training plan." -- Leaf [2].

Pastoral care of the congregation in female midlife crisis

Author
Mansu Kim
Abstract
"Although women in their forties and fifties play a crucial role as important dedicators in the Korean Church, they often feel loneliness and emptiness internally, not knowing where to be socially and domestically. Psychologically, they are considered `middle-aged.' In this paper, the author implemented a pastoral care program for middle-aged women in their forties and fifties under these circumstances to find out if the program helps them achieve spiritual maturity and restore their clear life direction and identity. The author conducted an eight-week small group pastoral care program entitled "Healing Mom- A Mother Becomes a Woman" for middle-aged women in their forties and fifties in his church. The program enabled the middle-aged women to reflect on their identity in faith and experience psychological and spiritual healing and recovery." -- Leaf [2].

"A Triple C" (Arouse, Control, Convert and Counsel) Model : effect of spiritual resiliency model in curbing suicide in service member's lives

Author
Oyedeji O. Idowu
Abstract
"The Military has always applied every necessary means available to them to curb the act of committing suicide, and there is still more to be done. . . . This project . . . will aid the military mission and effort to counter the rate of increase in service members' depression, suicide attempts, suicide completions, and any form of spiritually affected challenges. With this mind, I deemed it necessary to apply and implement the controllable ideas on how to help service members with their problems before it gets out of control through what I call AROUSE, CONTROL, CONVERT, CONNECT (ACCC) model. This model is a spiritual resiliency intervention model that can also apply to a non-religious type of setting." -- Leaf [2].

Moral injury : healing intervention for the wounded warrior

Author
Brent D. Culpen
Abstract
"Moral Injury is a fairly new term [that is] used to describe military personnel who have had their moral conscience compromised. However, the phenomenon appears to have been around for centuries, perhaps since soldiers have gone [off] to war and suffered in [the] aftermath. This study contends that when military chaplains refer individuals with mental issues to behavioral health services, chaplains miss the opportunity to offer much-needed religious guidance for those who suffer. In this study, the author examines how chaplains can help soldiers struggling with moral injury to make steps on the road to healing and recovery." -- Leaf [2].
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