Ministry

Chaplain Spiritual Assessment and Its Efficacy for the Palliative Care Team at Roper St. Francis Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary-Phenomenologic Inquiry

Author
Yhanco Monet
Abstract
A qualitative phenomenological research methodology was designed and implemented to answer the question: what is it that chaplains assessed which is perceived as useful for the Roper St. Francis Palliative Care team? Twelve Palliative Care practitioners, representing diverse specialties, were interviewed and surveyed to answer the research question. Evidence suggested that spiritual care and chaplaincy assessments were perceived as relevant to the Roper St. Francis’ Palliative Care praxis. However, the gathered data indicates that chaplains and Palliative Care practitioners would benefit from a more standardized/consistent spiritual assessment practice. A set of “Teaching Guidelines” and educational “Activities” was created with the goal of training chaplains in the art of doing Palliative Care spiritual assessments based on the research findings. A certified ACPE supervisor was interviewed about the viability and appropriateness of these “Teaching Guidelines” and “Activities.” This professional educator enriched the educative proposal and validated its potential to train staff chaplains as Palliative Care practitioners.

Engaging Millennials: The Quest to Revive their Participation and Commitment at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Gastonia, NC

Author
Kimberly Moore
Abstract
There are times when a church can have the look of success, but the zeal of that ministry is slowly diminishing. The older generation continues to do their best to keep ministry viable and moving, but there is a younger generation who does not see the importance of committing to anything beyond the Sunday morning experience. Through a series of Bible studies, sermons, outreach and moments of fellowship, this project engages the millennial generation and discovers ways to move them toward some level of commitment and participation within the Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Gastonia, NC. It is becoming more and more evident that we are dealing with a different generation of believers. This millennial generation loves God, but they do not care for tradition or routine. They are more tasks driven than program driven. Therefore, we must provide opportunities for them to serve based upon present need versus long-term desire.

A church-wide emphasis, with preaching and teaching, provided the platform for instilling in members of Polkville Baptist Church a better understanding of the individual's role in the community of faith, the goal being that a greater percentage of...

Author
Richard Lee Hamrick
Abstract
A church-wide emphasis, with preaching and teaching, provided the platform for instilling in members of Polkville Baptist Church a better understanding of the individual's role in the community of faith, the goal being that a greater percentage of members take an active role in the church. The twelve-member research group was tracked individually, and the control group was tracked as a unit. Following the emphasis, care was taken to discover if there were more members involved in the life of the church than before the emphasis. There was a clear growth in understanding and in the number of active members.

Practicing Sabbath to Reduce Stress Among Ministers in the Tyger River Baptist Association, Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
James Hailstock
Abstract
The Sabbath is the zenith of God’s creation and the climax of living. The key to reducing stress among ministers is the Sabbath lifestyle which includes practicing the disciplines of prayer, silence, feasting and fellowshipping in addition to identifying the signs and symptoms of stress. The Sabbath lifestyle empowers ministers with coping skills that can be personalized and implemented consistently as they progress and deal with the daunting demands and responsibilities of ministry. This project tested and compared the stress levels of the research and control groups before and after teaching four courses (disciplines) in the context of a Sabbath lifestyle to the research group only. During the retreat, four activities relative to the four courses were practiced by the research and control groups to determine if the courses had an impact on the activities to reduce stress among ministers. The project also revealed the effectiveness of the instructor, research site, courses, retreat, and activities. The project revealed strengths, weaknesses, and missteps. The results established that the courses did influence the activities to reduce stress among ministers.

PRE-FIELD ORIENTATION AND TRAINING OF FGM MISSIONARIES

Author
David Selvey D.Min.
Abstract
A lack of cross-cultural training in the secular and religious sectors has contributed to attrition of valuable workers who are engaged in cross-cultural contexts. Until the twentieth century, the impact of cross-cultural factors on the effectiveness and efficiency of international workers was not a serious consideration in the English-speaking world.

Mission agency training remained somewhat static until end of the twentieth century when several studies reported on missionary attrition factors and multi-national entities began to evaluate their losses due to cross-cultural issues. ReMAP and ReMAPII collated much data on missionary attrition, identifying several factors as preventable. Several of these factors pointed back to potential weaknesses in preparation and screening missionary candidates for cross-cultural work.

In response to this problem, this study presents the need for missionary Pre-Field Orientation and Training (PFOT) and lays a foundation that includes biblical, theological, historical, and practical reasons. The research includes ancient and current literature as well as case studies of the Pre-Field Orientation and Training programs of three major evangelical mission agencies.

The study produced a PFOT plan for Faith Global Missions that utilizes current technology and educational methods. The work includes the process of plan development, evaluative input from missionary trainers and training experts, PFOT subjects, and pedagogy that may be useful to Faith Global Missions and other missionary training organizations.

MEMBERSHIP RETENTION IN THE CHRISTIAN MEDICAL & DENTAL ASSOCIATIONS

Author
Allan Harmer D.Min.
Abstract
Affiliation with CMDA has historically been through membership. The number of members in an organization argues for attention and influence in the marketplace of ideas. It is a barometer of how participants view the value and relevance of an organization. Like other professional associations, CMDA's efforts to acquire and retain members has not produced the same results as in the past. The number of new members has not kept pace with those cancelling their memberships. Concern over CMDA's failure to retain members has motivated the present study.

The process of investigating the problem of membership retention included an internal analysis of CMDA's efforts, a literature review of professional associations and perspectives drawn from organizational and biblical change. Research suggested that a number of external forces in the last twelve years may have contributed to a drop in membership renewals: economic upheaval, dramatic generational shifts, technological changes, increased competition, and unprecedented changes in healthcare. Internally, due to its age and previous success, CMDA may have failed to respond to younger generation's expectations for greater value and benefits. Research also suggested that organizations failing to adjust to changing demographics may experience reduced influence and impact.

Survey and Focus Group data suggests that members want a more personal CMDA that facilitates the development of community on the local level, a greater focus on the needs of healthcare professionals and a greater priority on training-to-practice transitions, member engagement, marketing and resource development.

DEVELOPING AN EPHESUS CATALYTIC PARTNERSHIP AS A NEW WAY TO PLANT REPRODUCING CHURCHES IN MEGAMETRO, USA AND BEYOND

Author
D.E. Heidenreich D.Min.
Abstract
MegaMetro (pseudonym) is a major metropolitan area in the United States, a world-class city where commerce, education and tourism flourish. It is also home to several historic and renowned Christian ministries. At the same time, however, MegaMetro is home to a dispersed and diverse group of an estimated 500,000 Muslims of which the church has largely left unengaged. In fact, there is no Muslim background believer church in the area. While many other cities in the United States have Iranian churches, MegaMetro has none.

Meanwhile, exciting reports of Church Planting Movements (CPMs) have sprung up around the world, especially among Muslim populations. Missionaries and other believers active in some of these movements have formed Ephesus Teams as multi-organizational, collaborative partnerships to create synergy and maintain momentum.

This project was initiated as an investigative study to learn more about these Ephesus Teams and to apply the learning to MegaMetro. The research done was qualitative, through the use of Interview Protocols. Six Ephesus Teams were studied through in-depth interviews with eleven key leaders. At the same time, a study was also made of workers ministering among Muslims in MegaMetro through thirteen face-to-face interviews.

The research found that while the Ephesus Teams are seeing significant fruit in several difficult places around the world, workers in MegaMetro are largely frustrated. The project concludes with a strategic plan which seeks to implement some of the best practices of the Ephesus Teams into the context of Muslim ministry in MegaMetro.

BREAKING FREE FROM PERSONALITY-DRIVEN MINISTRY

Author
Steve Tomlinson D.Min.
Abstract
This major project, Breaking Free from Personality-Driven Ministry, investigates the tendency of pastors of evangelical churches to develop a cult of personality around their ministry. The project considers the biblical mandate to pursue humility, exegeting both narrative and didactic passages from the New and Old Testament, and then considers secular and Christian literature on the topic of humility and leadership. The field research includes qualitative and quantitative data seeking the perspectives of both clergy and lay leaders on what effective, humble leadership should look like and evaluates the responses in light of the biblical material and literature studied. The conclusion of the project is that humble, non-personality-driven church ministry is not only possible but should be pursued in a context of team leadership, accountability, and personal disciplines. Central to the project's findings is the need for a leader to nurture and pursue a gospel-focused vision.

RESPONDING TO OUR HEMORRHAGING FAITH IN CANADA BY EXPLORING A FAMILY-INTEGRATED CHURCH MODEL AS A SOLUTION IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA

Author
Michael Thiessen D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to respond to the identified crisis in disciple-making by exploring the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a Family-Integrated-Church ministry model.
To accomplish this SWOT analysis, there were four steps to this research project: A literature review, Biblical research on the family, twelve semi-structured interviews with FEB pastors, and an elders’ review of our FIC model at Grace Baptist Church in Alliston, Ontario. By doing this research project, I hoped to understand this ministry model better and sought to focus our local church disciple-making practices.

The information gleaned from this research project confirmed for me some of what I already knew anecdotally; there is a crisis in children’s and young adult ministry of which the family is a key part of both the problem and solution. The next generation needs to be able to follow their parents, who are worshipping, praying, and serving before them, in order to be made into passionate disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Prophetic Preaching to Foster Intergenerational Relationships in the Congregation

Author
James Alvin Jamison D.Min.
Abstract
Declining church attendance is a problem, locally and nationally, for many pastors and congregations. This decline is causing many pastors and churches to have concerns about the future survival of their ministries. There are many reasons given by church statisticians and church growth gurus for this decline. One of the problems can be traced to the generational divide that exists in many congregations between the seniors and those of younger age groups. This thesis offers strategies to use prophetic preaching as a tool to bridge the generation gap. The preacher has to be willing to be intentionally intergenerational in their approach to ministry and in the preparation and delivery of sermons. To do so, the preacher must craft sermons that include all generations so that the listening community becomes a church for all generations.
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