Marriage

Preaching About Biblical Marriage: An Evaluation of Functional Elements in Martyn Lloyd-Jones's Sermons on Ephesians 5:22-33 as Contained in the Book Christian Marriage and Its Implications for Modern Preachers

Author
Keith Wayne Hamilton D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this historical and biographical analysis was to understand the life and ministry of Martyn Lloyd-Jones and to draw implications from this understanding for contemporary pastors more faithfully to preach biblically concerning marriage. The overall ministry philosophy and methodology of Lloyd-Jones have been considered along with his value for biblical authority, expository preaching, and biblical marriage. This purpose was accomplished through qualitative research using content analysis on primary and secondary sources by and about Martyn Lloyd-Jones to understand what he believed about Christian preaching and ministry and to know how he applied that understanding personally and in the pulpit.

The research design for this study followed a qualitative approach to studying data. The study also implemented content analysis when examining individual sermons Lloyd-Jones preached from Ephesians 5:22-33 contained in Christian Marriage: From Basic Principles to Transformed Relationships. These sermons were evaluated according to the functional elements of explanation, illustration, and application to derive implications for pastors today.

The research is developed into three parts. First, in chapters 1-2, the thesis and life of Lloyd-Jones is described. Second, in chapters 3-4, his value for biblical expository preaching is established. Third, chapters 5-6 set forth the evaluating methodology for the eleven sermons. Fourth, chapter 7 validated the thesis by offering the analysis of data and research conclusions, along with further suggestions.

THE DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN EIGHT-WEEK, SMALL GROUP-BASED BIBLE STUDY COURSE FOR MARRIED COUPLES SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO STRENGTHEN THE MARRIAGE RELATIONSHIP

Author
David Alan Shaffer D.Min.
Abstract
This project seeks to answer the research question, “Does an eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants?” Today’s most effective marriage programs focus on important themes relevant to marriage and include transparency, a biblical foundation, and gentle accountability. Still, the question follows, “What comes next to further strengthen marriages?” This project answers this question with a process-based Bible study that, because of its design, strengthens the marriage relationship with improved communication, conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction (the three measures of this project). This methodology includes weekly individual study, couple discussion, and small group interaction.
Through the use of pre- and post-course surveys, the couples who participated in a study of Galatians provided ample quantitative research that yielded group, couples, and gender statistics. The couples’ data was measured by Positive Couple Agreement (PCA), which identifies couples’ responses as a relational strength when they choose the same response or are within one choice of each other (4 [agree] or 5 [strongly agree] on a positively worded statement, 2 [disagree] or 1 [strongly disagree] on a negatively worded statement).
The researcher designed Galatians: True Freedom – A Small Group Study for Couples to implement the new methodology to be evaluated. The quantitative data based on the pre- and post-course surveys provided the means to prove whether the three measures strengthened the marriages of the participating couples. The data supports the veracity of all three hypotheses (improved communication, improved conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction), showing strong growth in each measure, most notably with communication. These results led to the research conclusion: Yes, the methodology used in this eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples developed for this applied research project did strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants.

CONTRASTING CONTRACTUAL AND COVENANT MARRIAGE IDEAS IN THE LIVES OF BELIEVERS FROM A MUSLIM BACKGROUND

Author
Nakhati Jon D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
Islamic marriage is a contract, and biblical marriage is a covenant. These two principles intersect and form a point of reestablishment in the marriages of believers from a Muslim background (BMBs).

Islamic contractual marriage ideas remain in marital relationships of BMBs. The intent of this study is to explore and understand the influence of Islamic contractual marriage on believers who now embrace the ideas of Christian covenant marriage.

The qualitative research will explore the believers’ understanding of their Islamic contractual marriage and their beliefs concerning biblical covenant marriage. BMBs retain a contractual view of marriage because they have not applied the ideas of covenant marriage, thereby affecting negatively their spousal relationships. Additionally, the use of certain cultural and religious terms reinforces their understanding of their marital relationship, often reflecting either a contractual or covenant perspective.

For BMBs and missionaries there is a deficiency of available literature that compares and explains the differences between the Islamic and biblical views of marriage. This study hopes to be a foundational resource to highlight areas which possibly are retained in these marriages.

Supporting interfaith marriage : tools for crossing boundaries and nurturing growth

Author
Bonni-Belle Fisackerly Pickard
Abstract
The prevalence of interfaith marriages has increased significantly following a radical social rethinking of marriage. Though faith communities have traditionally rejected those who ‘marry out’, such persons often have a deep respect for the sacred even as they push back against religious traditions which have lost touch with contemporary reality. This project addresses the low success rate of exogamous marriages by developing tools which enable interfaith marriages to succeed. It explores theologies of marriage derived from primary texts of Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam, recognising the liminal potential of interfaith marriages to open new lines of communication between faith and society.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Marriage Discipleship Through a Small Group Bible Study

Author
Brian Peterson D.Min.
Abstract
Marriage Discipleship Through a Small Group Bible Study.
Marriage Discipleship is a vital area of need in local churches. This project investigates the most important biblical truths on marriage as well as the common difficulties that need to be addressed in the discipleship of married couples. This project records the development of an eight-week small group Bible study designed to assist marriage couples in navigating marriage. The research includes a detailed analysis of the biblical data as well as a glimpse at the author's research of his own congregation. The project provides a practical way of discipling marriage couples within a local church context.

Understanding the Transformative Effect Suffering has on the Health of Marital Commitment in Devout Christian Marriages

Author
Patrick S. Lovejoy D.Min.
Abstract
This phenomenological study assessed, retrospectively, the transformative effect suffering has on the strength of marital commitment in devout Christian marriages. The study yielded a shared experience of suffering being viewed as instrumental in the development of strong intimate ties and shared sacred history within the marriages of the participants. Couples agreed that various forms of suffering refined their marital commitment towards one another and helped supply a lasting shared intimacy with the marriage. Many marriages equate suffering to evidence of failure and flee relationships preventing the birth of the resiliency necessary to navigate the transitions that come from enduring suffering.

The effect of emotional expressiveness on marital satisfaction of Chinese couples

Author
Ling-Huei Wang
Abstract
This study examined the effect of emotional expressiveness on marital satisfaction for Chinese couples. Findings from this study did not show that emotional expressiveness played an important role in marital satisfaction among the overseas Chinese subjects. However, feelings of ambivalence over emotional expressiveness strongly predicted marital distress for the Chinese female subjects. For the Chinese male subjects, it seems that factors other than emotions, such as economic status and age of children, could have more influence on their marital satisfaction.

A study of the Fresh Start Program in the context of the Australian society

Author
Robert L Carner
Abstract
This thesis is a combination of 'historical-descriptive' and 'action' research. Insofar as possible, the effectiveness of the divorce recovery program known as Fresh Start Australia Pty. Ltd. was evaluated. The thesis includes a study of the high rate of divorce, the social impact of the disintegration of the family and the perceived failure of the church to address this problem. The writer seeks to encourage and endorse marriage and contrast the benefits to direct and collateral damage done by divorce. Insofar as possible, the writer examined the biblical role of marriage, divorce and re-marriage throughout biblical and contemporary times. The research includes pre- and post-seminar assessments with the attendees (clients) of two Queensland Fresh Start chapters; a five-year follow-up with former clients; follow-up surveys with former Fresh Start facilitators, speakers and other leaders; surveys almost 500 ministers and other church leaders seeking to determine the attitudes toward marriage/divorce/re-marriage; and, over 1700 surveys of a cross section of the Australian society regarding attitudes and values on relationships/marriage/fidelity/divorce/re-marriage.

An analysis of the theological position and role of the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon on divorce

Author
Shey K Kengwa
Abstract
The first chapter discusses the understanding of marriage and divorce in traditional Cameroon society, and the church's and Islam's understanding of marriage and divorce. Chapter 2 deals with factors that create the desire to end marriage contracts. Chapter 3 discusses the history of marriage and divorce in the church, the concept of marriage and divorce in the Old Testament, the Gospels, the letters of Paul, the Reformation church, and the Orthodox Church. The fourth chapter focuses on some current issues of marriage and divorce in the Presbyterian Church in Cameroon. Chapter 5 discusses a specific project on marriage and divorce.
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