Marriage counseling

An Evaluation of the Efficacy of E-Learning on Marital Conflict

Author
Ly Hai Tran D.Min.
Abstract
Despite the availability of quality evidence-based interventions like certain therapies and relationship-educational resources, marital strain and divorce continue to be problems in the U.S. and around the world today. Among the number of reasons couples seek dissolution or suffer through years of dissatisfaction, conflict and poor communication skills stand out as not only one of the main common denominators but the issue that prevents all the other problems from being addressed. Therapy and education are readily available, but several barriers prevent couples from taking advantage of such resources: financial limitations, accessibility or knowledge of the resources, or social stigma reasons.

Technology and the trending availability of online resources present an opportunity to bridge existing help resources for couples with e-learning platforms that may creatively overcome such barriers. Can e-learning and online marital education resources on critical issues like conflict resolution help to improve marriages?

This study, which followed eight individuals as they went through an online educational course on marital conflict, determined that, if left on their own without any additional help and with only the course to guide them, they could experience notable improvements in their marriage using e-learning marital resources. This finding opens the door to future research and numerous application questions as online delivery platforms are capable of dramatically outpacing the financial and scalability constraints of traditional in-person marriage therapy and relationship education.

The Lived Experiences of Marital Therapy for Couples Who Have Achieved
Positive Relationship Outcomes

Author
Lambert Louise Lambert D.Min.
Abstract
Marriage is in a crisis in North America. The reported divorce rate ranges between 30-50%. Separation and divorce is disrupting the stability of the family and its members, including Christian homes. Many couples, finding the prospect of marriage to be risky, are opting to cohabitate to test their relationships, which increases the potential for divorce should they marry. However, research shows that healthy, satisfying marriages have positive benefits for those couples and their children.
Some couples that seek counseling for their marriage problems are able to adjust well and rebuild their marital relationships, while others are not. An interpretive phenomenological analysis examined the lived experiences of six couples, who were nominated by mental health professionals or self-referred, and confirmed by the Dyadic Adjustment Scale as couples who achieved positive relationship outcomes following marriage counseling. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted, and a conceptual mapping task was completed, for each participating couple. After a rigorous analysis of the data, four significant themes emerged. Achieving healthy relationship functioning for couples following marriage counseling involves: (a) improving their communication, (b) being willing to work on their relationship, (c) accepting their partners for who they are, and (d) relying on their faith as a resource. The results of this study may have important implications for couples in marriage counseling, as well as those working with couples: counselors, therapists, pastors, medical practitioners, community organizations, and faith-based organizations.

The Lived Experiences of Marital Therapy for Couples Who Have Achieved Positive Relationship Outcomes

Author
Lambert Louise Lambert D.Min.
Abstract
Marriage is in a crisis in North America. The reported divorce rate ranges between 30-50%. Separation and divorce is disrupting the stability of the family and its members, including Christian homes. Many couples, finding the prospect of marriage to be risky, are opting to cohabitate to test their relationships, which increases the potential for divorce should they marry. However, research shows that healthy, satisfying marriages have positive benefits for those couples and their children.
Some couples that seek counseling for their marriage problems are able to adjust well and rebuild their marital relationships, while others are not. An interpretive phenomenological analysis examined the lived experiences of six couples, who were nominated by mental health professionals and confirmed by the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, as couples who achieved positive relationship outcomes following marriage counseling. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted, and a conceptual mapping task was completed, for each participating couple. After a rigorous analysis of the data, four significant themes emerged. Achieving healthy relationship functioning for couples following marriage counseling involves: (a) improving their communication, (b) being willing to work on their relationship, (c) accepting their partners for who they are, and (d) relying on their faith as a resource. The results of this study may have important implications for couples in marriage counseling, as well as those working with couples: counselors, therapists, pastors, medical practitioners, community organizations, and faith-based organizations.

Supporting interfaith marriage : tools for crossing boundaries and nurturing growth

Author
Bonni-Belle Fisackerly Pickard
Abstract
The prevalence of interfaith marriages has increased significantly following a radical social rethinking of marriage. Though faith communities have traditionally rejected those who ‘marry out’, such persons often have a deep respect for the sacred even as they push back against religious traditions which have lost touch with contemporary reality. This project addresses the low success rate of exogamous marriages by developing tools which enable interfaith marriages to succeed. It explores theologies of marriage derived from primary texts of Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam, recognising the liminal potential of interfaith marriages to open new lines of communication between faith and society.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

An army chaplain's guide to help single servicemembers navigate the dating process

Author
Patrick Hester
Abstract
This project presents training to help single servicemembers safely navigate the dating process. The training, unlike the Army’s Single Soldiers Strong Bonds program, welcomes a single servicemembers’ romantic partner. This training incorporates key elements of the Strong Bonds' training, but in less time and with additional resources. The author prepared a questionnaire addressing key aspects of dating for the members of the 3rd Squadron 61st Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The feedback was used to develop training that focuses on helping single servicemembers acquire the knowledge needed to assess if a potential romantic partner’s qualities are conducive for a healthy romantic relationship.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Understanding the Transformative Effect Suffering has on the Health of Marital Commitment in Devout Christian Marriages

Author
Patrick S. Lovejoy D.Min.
Abstract
This phenomenological study assessed, retrospectively, the transformative effect suffering has on the strength of marital commitment in devout Christian marriages. The study yielded a shared experience of suffering being viewed as instrumental in the development of strong intimate ties and shared sacred history within the marriages of the participants. Couples agreed that various forms of suffering refined their marital commitment towards one another and helped supply a lasting shared intimacy with the marriage. Many marriages equate suffering to evidence of failure and flee relationships preventing the birth of the resiliency necessary to navigate the transitions that come from enduring suffering.

Conducting marriage enrichment programs in the local church

Author
Janming Hou
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate participant-perceived factors that would influence the learning experience in a marriage education program designed and led by their pastor in a Chinese ethnic local church in America.The study used the qualitative case study research technique. Twelve couples were assembled. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with them. The recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative analysis method.Four themes emerged from the analysis: trustworthy pastor, ready participants, effective program, and complementary practices. The positive presence of these four themes create good learning experiences.

Exploring the effect of emphasizing unity and partnership in marital education on couple closeness and marital satisfaction

Author
Kenneth A Eichler
Abstract
Christian marriage educators are looking for ways to decrease the divorce rate. The author hypothesized that increasing levels of unity and partnership within marriage would correlate to higher levels of closeness/intimacy and marital satisfaction. The method used to prove this hypothesis was to infuse marital education with concepts and strategies of unity and partnership in an eight-hour seminar, 30 day exercise guide, email communications, and measuring change in levels over a 120 day period. The results demonstrated a significant increase in levels and a strong correlation between increased levels of unity and partnership and those of closeness/intimacy and marital satisfaction.

Marriage relationship enrichment in Shinyanga District of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Tanzania east of Lake Victoria Diocese

Author
Emmanuel Joseph Makala
Abstract
The aim of this research project is to determine whether Lutheran couples in the Shinyanga District of South East of Lake Victoria Diocese could increase their satisfaction with their marriage relationship after attending personal seminars in private rooms of the church. The program aims to measure quantitatively the increase of their satisfaction and commitment to their relationship over a period of five months. A total of two hundred participants will be included. The outcome over time will be determined through a statistical comparison of pre-seminar data versus post-seminar data from the couples. There will be two groups: one with a full five daylong seminars held in the church, and a control group who do not receive the seminars.
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