Liturgy

Vox Sancti Spiriti

Author
Victor J Pergola
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to impact the spiritual life of a select group of Christian professionals in the Cleveland, Ohio area. The chosen method included administration of a pre-test and post-test Likert Scale instrument that was built within an eight session course on spirituality. The results indicated a significant increase in awareness for growth in spirituality. There were three themes of emphasis: a focus on worship and liturgy in congregational groups; a focus on prayerful sharing of Scripture in small group settings; and a refocus on the importance of Scripture for Christian growth.

Commentary on selected hymns

Author
Gerald L Tyer
Abstract
The main text of this paper is a worship resource containing commentaries upon twenty-five selected hymns. Hymnody is used paradigmatically to demonstrate that worship and church administration are integrally related. The root meaning of "liturgy" etymologically illustrates this point: leitourgia means "the work of the people". This paper suggests the thesis that worship and ministry are activities of all Christians (both clergy and laity). Church administration is the framework for effective ministry. Worship empowers the gathered church to do mission which is both internal (directed toward the church) and external (directed to the world).

Lectio divina: bridging the gap between preachers and adolescents

Author
Brendan Moss
Abstract
Lectio Divina: Bridging the Gap between Preachers and Adolescents suggests that preachers employ the monastic practice of Lectio Divina (holy reading) with youth to engage them in the preaching event. In the first chapter the author explores contemporary adolescence. In the second chapter he explores the characteristics of adolescent spirituality. In chapter three he introduces the practice of Lectio Divina. Finally, in chapter four, the author describes a workshop he created and facilitated to help preachers learn how to use Lectio Divina with youth, enhance the preacher's preparation process, and the youths' experience of the preached Word.

Liturgy as pastoral care: congregational worship as self-interpretive response to transition

Author
Charles D Hackett
Abstract
This "reflective" dissertation explores the ways in which liturgy functions as corporate pastoral care within a changing community. Trading on the insights of narrative theology, and examining specifically the program of hermeneutical pastoral care as developed by Charles V. Gerkin as it came to be utilized in a parish setting, this dissertation models an interdisciplinary approach to pastoral leadership which involves all of the primary taks of ordained ministry. Of particular interest are the ways in which the dynamics of ego psychology can be applied generally to groups, and more specifically to the on-going narrative life of a faith community.

Identity and evangelical style

Author
David W Schulte
Abstract
This study investigates a growing trend among ELCA and other liturgical churches. The trend involves a move away from traditional liturgical worship to a contemporary style. I sought to enhance my understandings of both this new approach and of the essential elements of Christian worship. A conference on "Worship as Evangelism" at Prince of Peace Lutheran in Burnsville, Minnesota, and extensive readings from both sides of the issue were the basis of the project. I then analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and came to a decision regarding limits in cultural adaptation in worship.

Liturgy during periods of war: response in worship to human need

Author
Jasper N Keith
Abstract
This study encourages the involvement of ministers and laity in the consideration of liturgical structure and content during periods of war. Pastors and laity review liturgy from the historical bulletins of their own congregations. They are supported in the formation of new skills in the creation of liturgy. Believers come to recognize connections between periods of history, shared emotions and their participation in the biblical narrative. This supports the formation of further materials for teaching and reflection which import the significance of international conflict on the way they worship and their expectations.

Providing pastoral care through liturgy

Author
Donna L Knight
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to assist pastors to minister in ways which address the entirety of an individual's life experience through the presence of Christ's church in worship. Chapter 1 includes an exploration of the use of liturgy and pastoral care. Chapters 2-4 report the psychological, sociological, and theological needs of individuals who have experienced the crisis of terminal illness, rape, or abortion, respectively. Liturgies designed to alleviate the suffering and facilitate the healing processes of such individuals were developed and are included in corresponding chapters.

Renewing the eucharist: a study in liturgical theology

Author
Richard L Houtz
Abstract
This thesis explores and analyzes some representative approaches in the field of liturgical theology, and develops a process for renewing the eucharistic practice of the church. The project concludes that the insights of liturgical theology can provide a basis for a thorough evaluation of a congregation's eucharistic life, and can help develop a comprehensive program for eucharistic renewal. The first section of the project develops a foundational basis in liturgical theology by reviewing and analyzing the approaches of five representative scholars. The second section uses these insights to interpret the practice of Eucharist in a particular liturgical context. Based on the evaluation of this context, the third section proposes a model for eucharistic renewal. The final section includes a summary and critique of the project.

Liturgy as event: enabling worshippers to develop Christian identity through the annual cycle of the liturgical year

Author
Stephen R Vance
Abstract
The church in the United States exists in a cultural context where the individual identity of its members could best be described as schizophrenic: believers who struggle with balancing multiple identities in a culture that generates so many from which to choose. Yet the church has within its tradition the cycle of the liturgical year, a resource of immeasurable power in assisting persons of faith build, shape and strengthen their identity as disciples of Jesus Christ. Meaningful, well thought-out liturgical events are extremely effective in developing Christian identity, an identity that can prevail against the other words and other stories that would coopt and destroy the unique identity of the church. Particular orders of worship for specific ritual events are a major part of this dissertation.
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