Interpersonal relations

A model of process for interpersonal interaction in marital therapy

Author
Robert P Huizenga
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to state clearly and concisely a model for marital therapy. I demonstrate that the model is closely associated with personal assumptions , is based on particular theoretical constructs , and can be utilized in interpersonal interaction.

The first chapter lists particular personal assumptions and states the importance of articulating assumptions. Systems theory, which embraces a theory of process, is outlined in Chapter II. Tri-Modal Structuring, with its three modes of interaction, is described in Chapter III. Finally , Chapter IV demonstrates the utilization of the model by presenting a case study of marital therapy.

This paper is an attempt to express in written form what I have attempted to integrate over the past three years. As such, it is an attempt to state in my own words what I have seen, heard, read, experienced and thought regarding therapy. I have attempted to take that which I have encountered and in a brief and simple way, state the coherent principles which become my guide in the maze of interpersonal interaction.

A Christian response to religious violence : a curriculum addressing non-retaliation and peace in northern Nigeria

Author
Apollos Inuwa Handan
Abstract
The goal of this study is to provide student pastors with a roadmap for peaceful coexistence through forgiveness and reconciliation as taught by Jesus and early Christians in the theology of non-retaliation found in the New Testament. Jesus' point of emphasis in his teaching is that his followers should avoid violence, whether capital punishment or engaging in destructive war in his name. Jesus taught his followers this new approach because he knew that those who were committed to following him would surely have enemies who would physically attack them. He knew that as humans we are bound to react to our enemies in the form of anger, sorrow, or defensiveness. Graduates of Pastors' School, Jos, and their congregations will have a mandate to apply Jesus' teaching on peace and forgiveness in their relationship with Muslims in northern Nigeria. This curriculum will address four basic areas of concern within four semesters. Each basic area of study in a semester will provide description, purpose or goal, objectives, requirements and procedures.

Faithful conversations : same-sex relationships and the Christian faith

Author
Mara Joy Norden
Abstract
The evangelical Christian church’s collective heart is breaking over same-sex marriage; multiple congregations and denominations are splitting because they cannot live together with their differing convictions. In contrast, this project explores how a local congregation can grow in unity, purity, and peace while holding a variety of viewpoints on same-sex marriage. The project consisted of a congregation-wide event called <cite>Faithful Conversations: Same-Sex Relationships and the Christian Faith.</cite> First, the pastors complexified the conversation around same-sex marriage and the Christian faith beyond for and against by presenting five faithful Christian responses to same-sex marriage. Second, a licensed therapist facilitated a panel discussion where people holding different perspectives on same-sex marriage shared their stories, values, and viewpoints. Third, the facilitator invited the congregation to interact with panel members using an adaptation of the Restorative Circles process for people experiencing conflict. Data from the project reveal that this congregation defied the pattern of division over same-sex marriage. In fact, the congregation grew in authenticity of relationships, mutual understanding, and theological insight. Based on the results of this project, the researcher developed a model called Faithful Conversations: Same-Sex Relationships and the Christian Faith for use in other congregations.

Developing Holistic Health in Pastors and Christian Leaders through a Supervised Peer Support Network

Author
Mark Schweitzer D.Min.
Abstract
This project is designed to develop holistic health in pastors and Christian leaders through a supervised peer support gathering. During the twelve week gathering that met for two hours each week the supervisor created a relational dynamic that allowed the participants to share their lives and ministry in a safe environment as they learned to assess themselves biblically using holistic health as a framework. Each participant set holistic health goals and used accountability provided by the supervisor and peer group. The project made a significant impact in the holistic health as those who participated developed new patterns or further developed old patterns.

Cultivating holy friendships : an ecumenical cohort model for redemptive social change

Author
Thomas A. Williams
Abstract
"The project question the author engaged was this: How can I connect local ecumenical leaders together to support and build courage together to make a faithful, sustained, redemptive social change in local communities? The author argues in this paper that faithful movements for redemptive social change arise from leaders who were supported, challenged, complimented, and inspired by a community of friends. This paper outlines the condition of loneliness in our culture and among our clergy and congregations, and how an intentional cohort model of support can connect clergy to one another around community issues of importance. In the course of this project the author met with community clergy, researched other cohort models, and attempted to assemble those pastors together. The model adjusted from a "convening" model toward gatherings centered on an issue. The issue carried the convening power rather than the idea of convening a group of potential friends." -- Leaf [2].

Nurturing clergy and laity relationships for effective ministry

Author
Drexel N. Mitchell
Abstract
"This project explores the challenges of the decline in clergy and laity relationships within local Christian Methodist Episcopal Churches on the Fort Worth District which has significantly impacted upward trajectory in creating an atmosphere of effective ministry. The project revealed that clergy and laity alike share mutual positive and negative concerns that, if bridged together with intentionality, provide a viable schematic for fostering evangelistic growth and the spiritual formation of disciples. Conclusively, the pastors, lay persons and churches of the Fort Worth District have displayed and experienced improvement in the area of church administration and refocused ministries that have the potential to increase growth spiritually and numerically." -- Leaf [2].

No Longer Servants, But Friends: Toward a Relational Approach to Spiritual Leadership Development

Author
Rebecca J. Girrell D.Min.
Abstract
No Longer Servants, but Friends: Toward a Relational Approach to Spiritual Leadership Development is a participatory action research project in which the pastor-researcher and the leadership development team (LDT) of a small United Methodist congregation worked collaboratively to shift the team’s mindset and methods from nominations to leadership development. Using a shared leadership model and tools of appreciative inquiry, the pastor-researcher encouraged the LDT to identify gaps in the church’s leadership system and brainstorm and implement possible solutions. The intervention took place during the 2019-2020 program year and was, therefore, affected by the unanticipated challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and the pastor-researcher’s move to a different church. This allowed the pastor-researcher to observe the LDT’s shift in mindset and methods under the pressure of these circumstances.
The pastor-researcher observed the LDT’s process and outcomes and evaluated the members’ self-reported experiences via questionnaire, group interviews, and meeting transcripts. The key findings of the study illustrated that the LDT members experienced their process favorably, especially as evidenced by adopting the collaborative and systemic approaches they experienced in the intervention and applying these approaches to their work with other church leaders. Additionally, the study found that LDT members reported reduced anxiousness in their tasks, increased confidence in their effectiveness, and strong commitment to their shift in mindset, even in the face of the unanticipated crises. Most LDT members attributed these positive experiences to aspects of the intervention, including shared purpose, understanding of the church leadership system, collaborative leadership, and relationship with the pastor-researcher. The pastor-researcher identified opportunity for further study regarding long-term effects of such interventions and the impacts of interpersonal relationships, particularly with the pastor, on the experience and process of church leadership development.

A study on healthy Christian community formation through relational spirituality

Author
Young-wan Song
Abstract
This paper defines the essential spirituality of a Christian and interprets spirituality necessary at the moment under a frame of relationship through a view of spirituality to recover relationships. recovery of relationship requires special (relational) spirituality, which must reach out to relationships with others by recovering full relationship with God through a life that pursues whole inhaling God’s spirit and seek for the image of God.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Lessons from Rwanda : moving through and beyond betrayal by clergy

Author
Kimberly A. Jackson
Abstract
Clergy and ministry leader betrayal negatively impacts people’s trust in the church and belief in God. To discern how we may move through and beyond such trauma, the author interviewed Rwandans who survived the 1994 genocide who knew of priests and nuns who betrayed churches in their care. The author then shared these findings with congregations in the United States who have been harmed by pastors or ministry leaders to determine if justice and mercy may enable their own journey towards forgiveness and reconciliation. The findings suggest repentance and atonement are key to forgiveness, whether reconciliation with perpetrators is possible.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

An army chaplain's guide to help single servicemembers navigate the dating process

Author
Patrick Hester
Abstract
This project presents training to help single servicemembers safely navigate the dating process. The training, unlike the Army’s Single Soldiers Strong Bonds program, welcomes a single servicemembers’ romantic partner. This training incorporates key elements of the Strong Bonds' training, but in less time and with additional resources. The author prepared a questionnaire addressing key aspects of dating for the members of the 3rd Squadron 61st Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The feedback was used to develop training that focuses on helping single servicemembers acquire the knowledge needed to assess if a potential romantic partner’s qualities are conducive for a healthy romantic relationship.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]
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