Intergenerational relations

The Role of the Family-Equipping Model in Church Planting and Replanting Training for the Calvary Family of Churches in Englewood, CO

Author
Franklin Samuel Trimble D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
This project focuses on the combined efforts of the family ministry movement and the replanting movement in equipping current and future planters and replanters in family ministry. In the project, the reader will be given biblical, theological, historical, and ecclesiological examples of what a healthy family ministry can look like. This project is meant to encourage and equip future and current ministers, especially those with few resources, as they seek to develop a healthy family ministry culture in their contexts. Churches can see healthy family ministry established in their midst regardless of the number of resources at their disposal.
Throughout the project, the reader is given biblical instruction regarding the primacy of parental discipleship in relation to the biblical instruction of children. This primacy is made even more specific when the project addresses the role of the husband and father in the home-discipleship process. The project then looks to Hebrews 3 & 10 to address the need for all ages of the church to meet regularly. Once the biblical and theological groundwork has been laid, the project then moves into a section in which the history of modern youth ministry is examined in contrast with the historical precedent of family worship. Ecclesiological matters are then discussed in detail such as the importance of intentionally limiting church calendars and the need for a plurality of elders that can lead a congregation in meaningful membership which then leads to accountable shepherding.

Everyone Eats: Preaching to Inspire Multigenerational Engagement in Worship Beyond Virtual and Traditional Contexts

Author
Curis Tyriece Bryant D.Min.
Abstract
The traditional black church has suffered in recent years from declining attendance. The biggest cause for the decline is linked to the massive exodus of younger generations from the traditional context. This phenomenon has inspired pastors, preachers, and thought leaders to engage in conversation of how to address the issue. That conversation has revealed generational engagement in preaching as one solution to stimulating congregational life within a traditional worship context. This thesis explores the use of a multigenerational preaching approach to inspire congregational engagement. This thesis will posit that preaching where sermons intentionally reach different generations in a similar context, will result in engagement for both older and younger generations. The principles of this strategy will also prove useful beyond the current virtual settings imposed by the Coronavirus.

The Ministry Benefits and Personal Growth that Came from Using Participatory Action Research to Develop a Workshop for Cree Mentors

Author
Benjamin Kenneth Peltz D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry (DMin) Research Portfolio details the author’s development as a leader throughout the program via his Leadership Narrative, Ministry Context Analysis, Project Report, and Philosophy of Leadership. His research project consisted of using Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods to develop a mentoring workshop for Cree adults. Using PAR methods caused him to revisit his assumptions and alter the way he designed and ran the workshop, which increased participants’ confidence in ways that he did not originally anticipate. This experience, alongside other elements of the DMin program and developments in his leadership responsibilities, led him to identify his calling as leading intergenerational and intercultural reconciliation using communal discernment processes. Alongside demonstrating how spiritual experiences, faithful mentors, Christian community, and formal education can enable an individual to overcome a difficult upbringing and become a capable Christian leader, this portfolio offers insights into the value of using PAR and similar processes for improving ministry endeavours in an indigenous context.

Developing a Tool for Bridging Generation Gaps Via the Study and Execution of Local Mission Projects at Canton First Baptist Church, Canton, NC

Author
John Greene D.Min.
Abstract
Developing a Tool for Bridging Generation Gaps Via the Study and Execution of Local Mission Projects at Canton First Baptist Church, examined the idea that a church’s local mission efforts can unite people across generations, because focus on a greater goal bridges preconceptions. The researcher assembled groups of varying generational makeup, surveyed them to find preconceptions about missions and generations, and directed them to serve a local ministry. Tracking the groups’ opinions along generational lines throughout showed the effect missions made. The project showed local missions can bridge the generation gap, so long as the participants are open to change.

Practicing faith together : Messy Church and disciple formation

Author
Johannah G. Myers
Abstract
How can the foundation of Messy Church be used to create discipleship groups where all ages practice faith together at Aldersgate United Methodist Church? In order to make disciples, churches must create space for all ages to apprentice faith together. The author engaged educational theories and Jesus' own example, specifically researching apprenticeship as a model for learning faith. The author developed intergenerational small groups using the values and model of Messy Church. The project suggests that Messy Church provides a solid foundation for creating space for all ages to practice faith together.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Intergenerational faith education through death and preparation education

Author
Seongyong Lee
Abstract
Death is a place where everything appears. No one can hide before death or demonstrate oneself. Hence, it may be more fearful. In the present age, we try to forget the word, death. Christianity, however, has constantly been speaking of beating death, and even more so than victory, it has been talking about the work bearing new fruit through death. The modern church has told such words of salvation but has not accepted into its heart – where a place to accept faith. The author tries to find the following in his ministry setting: the reason why we must think of death, a new perspective of seeing death, experiences facing death, a life of self-denying and carrying one’s cross through participation in death, and the biblical teachings of productive death as a grain of wheat falls into the earth, dies, and bears much fruit.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

A child shall lead them : embracing intergenerational leadership for the missional work of the church

Author
Loletuth Kalz
Abstract
The author researched using an intergenerational leadership structure for the purpose of addressing a missional opportunity in the life of a local church congregation. She studied the biblical support for intergenerational leadership and how this kind of leadership supports the missional work of the church. Analysis suggests that cultivating an intergenerational leadership team can be an effective means of cultivating relationships between people from different generations while at the same time developing more diverse voices of leadership that encourages and expands the missional impact of a worshipping community.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Developing a strategic plan for intergenerational mentoring at First Baptist Church, Andrews, Texas

Author
Clayton D Chisum
Abstract
The purpose of the project was to develop a strategy for an intergenerational mentoring ministry at First Baptist Church, Andrews, Texas. The project director researched the fields of mentoring, church leadership, and intergenerational relationships to determine the best methods and practices for the strategy. From this research, the project director created an annotated bibliography and report on best practices. The project director investigated several strategic planning models and selected the most appropriate model as a guide for the project. In order to identify barriers and opportunities for the ministry, the project director conducted and audit of First Baptist Church, Andrews, Texas, through an online questionnaire and demographic study. The project director created a dynamic ministry strategy presentation that was presented by the project director to the church staff for formal approval.

Prophetic Preaching to Foster Intergenerational Relationships in the Congregation

Author
James Alvin Jamison D.Min.
Abstract
Declining church attendance is a problem, locally and nationally, for many pastors and congregations. This decline is causing many pastors and churches to have concerns about the future survival of their ministries. There are many reasons given by church statisticians and church growth gurus for this decline. One of the problems can be traced to the generational divide that exists in many congregations between the seniors and those of younger age groups. This thesis offers strategies to use prophetic preaching as a tool to bridge the generation gap. The preacher has to be willing to be intentionally intergenerational in their approach to ministry and in the preparation and delivery of sermons. To do so, the preacher must craft sermons that include all generations so that the listening community becomes a church for all generations.

The Spirituality of Fatherhood: Developing a Faith Formation Program for the Archdiocese of Chicago

Author
Willie Robert Cobb Jr. D.Min.
Abstract
This thesis-project set out to explore the current faith formation programs offered in the Archdiocese of Chicago and the experience of fathers within this context, to support the spiritual growth of fathers and to explore how the church is called to support that growth through faith formation. The meta-method employed for this thesis-project involves the four “movements” of the “pastoral circle” developed by Joe Holland and Peter Henriot, with two additional steps—engagement with theory and correlation. The process included both a broad approach and a personal outreach to those working in the African American and queer communities. Direct outreach to various parishes throughout the Archdiocese of Chicago entailed making phone calls, sending emails, or stopping by a total of 32 parishes. In the end, three focus groups were conducted. The moderator completed all the necessary IRB paperwork and permissions prior to the session meetings. The moderator encouraged participation from each participant in order to elicit information from every single person in the group. To facilitate the discussion, questions were presented to allow the participants to reflect on and share their experiences. Genograms were used to help the participants consider the impact of their personal family history on themselves and their children for several generations back. The project presented and answered the following questions: Does the Archdiocese of Chicago play a role in helping fathers understand how to raise their children, how to fight stereotypes they face about their fatherhood, and how to share their spirituality with their children in a way that interrupts patterns of violence and confronts the social issues they encounter? A two-tiered program was developed to address the concerns that were presented through the course of the project to provide agency for fathers in developing their own spirituality.
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