Hospitality--Religious aspects

Making Room: Conversations About Race and Faith Between Members of Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Charlotte, NC and St. John's Baptist Church in Charlotte, NC

Author
Martha Dixon Kearse
Abstract
In this project, the candidate recorded personal stories from members of two different Baptist congregations: Friendship Missionary Baptist Church (a church made up predominantly of members identifying as African-American) and St. John’s Baptist Church (a church made up predominantly of members identifying as Caucasian). Using those recordings, the candidate created a podcast called “Making Room,” and invited participating group members to listen to each other’s stories. In addition, the candidate invited these same group members to participate in conversations about issues of race, especially as they present themselves in Charlotte, NC. The candidate and group members challenged themselves with the biblical ethic of hospitality and explored conversations about how each individual might help to improve relationships between African-Americans and Caucasian Americans using that Christian ethic.

Enriching Christian Hospitality at Malaby's Crossroads Missionary Baptist Church in Knightdale, North Carolina

Author
Barbara Starr Barner
Abstract
Hospitality is the welcoming of strangers, family, and friends. In the early biblical and historical traditions, hospitality focused on welcoming the alien and extending resources to them. Hospitality, however, need not be limited to the basic physical needs of the stranger, but spiritual needs are to be addressed as well. In the reflection of Jesus’ work on the cross, Christian hospitality should be the intentional, responsible, and caring act of welcoming or visiting strangers, enemies, the distressed, downtrodden, without regard for reciprocation. The goal of this project was to enhance Malaby’s Christian hospitality culture and take our personal interactions to a higher spiritual level, thereby, nurturing, caring, and maturing the body of Christ. The ultimate goal of this study was to have this work be an available tool to address similar church congregations that need to create or enhance a positive culture of Christian hospitality.

Alien, orphan, enemy: religious accommodation for non-theists in the United States Navy

Author
Jeffrey C Quinn
Abstract
This project researched a process to motivate and equip Navy chaplains to appreciate the nature of non-theist worldviews and to proactively accommodate these preferences in their practice of professional naval chaplaincy. Non-theism (an umbrella term encompassing atheism, agnosticism, and humanism) was examined through historical, constitutional, legal, and demographic lenses to establish its status as a religious life-stance. Spiritual hospitality and an interpretive frame for interfaith dialogue provided a means of increasing chaplains' religious accommodation for non-theists. Pre-test and post-test evaluations measured the effectiveness of training in dialogue as a means of enacting hospitality toward the vulnerable other.

From hospitality to reconciliation: a way to move forward in dialog among Jewish, Muslim and Christian people

Author
Keith L Marsden
Abstract
The author tested the thesis that, through dialog with people of the three faith traditions of Abraham, the meta-value of hospitality allows for the emergence of hope, the practice of humility, and the application of wisdom, providing a way to increased reconciliation in an interfaith setting that increases understanding and helps reduce destructive conflict. The method for study was based on group dynamics process, psychological principles of active listening, and group session analysis. Through dialog groups, it was found that destructive conflict and clash can be averted while promoting increased respect of self and others.

Equipping selected leaders at Lakeshore Church, New Orleans, Louisiana, with Biblical hospitality practices

Author
George Ross D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected leaders at Lakeshore Church, New Orleans, Louisiana, with biblical hospitality practices. The project director will utilize the equipping model described in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Design Handbook. Additional purposes of this project were to develop and accomplish project goals and professional goals to strengthen the project director’s curriculum development and professional leadership. The project director researched a wide range of sources to gain fundamental knowledge of biblical hospitality. The project director will use the information to develop a curriculum that can be used by Lakeshore Church, New Orleans, as well as other churches, church planting and replanting networks, North American Mission Board (NAMB), and denominations wishing to implement discipleship programs.

Sharing the Eucharist: Anglican Participation in Roman Catholic Liturgies

Author
Donald H J Hermann
Abstract
This thesis examines the question whether Anglicans can make a compelling claim to greater participation in Roman Catholic liturgies by reception of Eucharistic communion at such liturgies. The methodology is derived from a process proposed by James and Evelyn Whitehead in Method in Ministry. The argument is made that Anglicans should be provided the same access to Roman Catholic Eucharistic communion as that provided to members of the Orthodox churches. Alternatively, it is argued that Anglicans be invited to receive Eucharistic communion at specific Roman Catholic liturgies that they are invited to attend, including marriages, funerals, and baptisms. Further, it is argued that Anglican spouses of Roman Catholics should have greater access to Roman Catholic Eucharistic communion than is now provided.
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