Evangelism--Strategy

The Faith Pyramid Evangelism Strategy: A Tool for Integrating Apologetics into Evangelism Training for Middle School and High School Students

Author
Samuel Lee Dallas III D.Min.
Abstract
This research demonstrates that apologetics material integrated into evangelism training increases the personal confidence of middle and high school students in sharing their faith. The anonymous surveys of thirty teenagers involved in the research showed an overall 33 percent increase in confidence (on a self-scoring ten-point scale) after participating in such training. Additionally, an overall 49 percent increase resulted in their perceived abilities to answer challenging questions during evangelistic discussions.
Such measurements were also validated in practical application. Graded quizzes on apologetics-related questions taken by the students both before and after the training revealed an overall 98 percent increase in scores. Finally, the students showed an overall 91 percent increase in sharing their faith in the two months following the training compared to the two months prior. These numbers reveal not only improvement in self-perception, but objective measures make the case for the success of this ministry project.
Chapter 1 introduces the ministry need and thesis of the dissertation in response to the need. Additionally, a layout of the researcher’s Faith Pyramid Evangelism Strategy is introduced.
Chapter 2 provides a biblical and theological justification for integrating apologetics into evangelism training and provides a historical justification for such an approach.
Chapter 3 examines the specific goals of this research as it relates to the subjective measures of teenage evangelists, the knowledge the researcher has sought to teach the students, and the desirable goal for an increase in evangelism as a result of such training.
Chapter 4 reviews the specific training of the thirty middle and high school students completed in the weekend seminar. The lessons were arranged into five workshops, followed by a survey given to the students two months following the training.
Chapter 5 provides a conclusion via an in-depth evaluation of the ministry project, as well as suggestions for future plans in implementing such training.

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


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