Discipling (Christianity)

Equipping Selected Adults of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, in Collegiate Disciple Making Skills

Author
Jason Scott McKinney
Abstract
The propose of this project was to equip selected adults of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, in collegiate disciple making skills. The project director researched the field of discipleship to better understand the best practices of training others to make disciples. The project director studied curriculum writing to enhance the teaching during eight training sessions. Then, the project director implemented the project by training selected members of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, with the best practices to disciple college students. The training seminar was taught on Friday night and the following Sunday morning. The participants were trained with disciple making skills.

A Case for Lament: Strategies to Augment Cross-Cultural Discipleship Efforts at Bridge Community Church and Cornerstone Church

Author
Sahr Mbriwa
Abstract
American evangelical Protestant churches in multicultural settings are predominantly monocultural. While some churches might be open to the idea of cross-cultural engagement, their discipleship process and methods tend to be greatly influenced by the dominant culture of the church and rarely influenced by the subdominant culture. This can hinder cross-cultural discipleship and engagement. In addition, one rhythm is glaringly absent in our discipleship: lament. Lament is essential to cross-cultural discipleship. This paper will explore the relationship between lament and cross-cultural discipleship. It will also offer four lament-based strategies to augment cross-cultural discipleship efforts in two monocultural evangelical Protestant churches: Bridge Community Church and Cornerstone Church.

Assessing, Identifying and Cultivating Ministries Toward a Mature Holistic Process of Disciple Making

Author
Brian Cederquist D.Min.
Abstract
Although discipleship seems to be a current buzzword in ministry today, it is more than just a current fad. Discipleship is deeply rooted in scripture. Even at a cursory look, one can easily see its importance to the church. This is why many pastors and churches have found themselves actively pursuing growth in this area. There have been countless books, studies, programs, and training opportunities available for pastors and churches to educate their people about discipleship. However, the process of evaluating one’s effectiveness in discipleship is often a piece of the puzzle that is left out. This project journals one churches process of defining, assessing, and cultivating their holistic process of disciple making. As you continue to lead your church through this process of evaluation, you may find this research helpful to your process. No two churches are alike, and no two evaluations will be identical. Please use this as a launching point for your own churches evaluation process.

Becoming More Like Jesus: Spiritual Formation As the Key to Congregational Disciple-Making

Author
Alan Chee-Siang Goh D.Min.
Abstract

This research portfolio tracks the discoveries I have made in the Doctor of Ministry program about my faith journey, understanding of spiritual formation, and desire for greater efficacy in disciple-making.
In writing my spiritual autobiography, I was blessed to realize the many ways I have been transformed in my life since saying ‘yes’ to Jesus at the age of eleven. More significantly, there was born in me a deep desire to discover how God formed and transformed me. Fueled by the courses in the DMin program, this growing interest in spiritual formation led me to believe that the teaching and understanding of spiritual formation must become the priority of my thinking and practice of ministry moving forward.
In the second section of this portfolio, my understanding of the spiritual formation process developed into a manual for teaching a basic spiritual formation course for believers.
For the third section, in order to see if a persuasive case could be made for teaching spiritual formation basics to everyone in the congregation, a research project was undertaken to teach spiritual formation to the elders of my church. Ultimately, the findings of the research did support that teaching spiritual formation will lead believers to a more comprehensive understanding. As a result, I am persuaded to prioritize a basic spiritual formation course for every believer and that this is key to achieving greater effectiveness in our church’s disciple-making.

Equipping Selected Leaders from Nepal in Essential Leadership Competencies

Author
Richard M Fraley
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to develop essential leadership competencies in cross-cultural context for selected leaders from Nepal. By equipping Nepalese in essential leadership competencies, the project director seeks to align the leaders to a vision taken from Revelation 7:9. The project director will synthesize his research in developing a list of essential competencies and then create curriculum that will be reproducing across house church networks. This will help leaders develop this vision of all peoples knowing and worshipping Jesus Christ. The msision will be impossible without well-trained and character-filled leadership reproducing across Nepal.

Outward Focused Church Cultural Shifts Leading to Missional Outcomes

Author
Rodger Woodworth
Abstract
The thesis of this project proposed that an inward focus prevented members of an established congregation from having authentic relationships or significant conversations of eternal matters with those outside the walls of the church. Thenographic information concerning internal and external challenges was gained through questionnaires and interviews. The study proceeded to examine biblical and theological foundations for an outward focus, re-envisioning a missional church culture, educated and equipped members through outward focused gatherings, and encouragement with unchurched people in the community by means of a common passion, to develop authentic, mutual relationships of trust and influence.

A Study of a Missional Life Accomplished by the Missional Spiritual Disciplines Focusing on Seowon Church

Author
Ki Song Nam
Abstract
This project paper studies the relationship between the missional spirituality and a missional life hoding the question, "how do the Christians lead a missinal life?" The author draws a conclusion that the missional spirituality has a positive influence on the Christians" missional life by comparing pre-project and post-project surveys carried out targeting the congregation of the Seowon Church who participated in the training course of the missional spiritual formation.

Developing a Disciple-Making Strategy for Deerfood Baptist Church, Trussville, Alabama

Author
Mark C Gainey
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a disciple-making strategy for Deerfood Baptist Church (DBC) in Trussville, Alabama. During the first phase of the project, the project director explored the demographics of DBC to assess the effectiveness of current disciple-making processes. In the second phase, the project director researched existing models of disciple-making to determine best practices. The third phase of the project involved the project director leading a strategy team to develop a disciple-making strategy for the church. The final phase of the project was to present the completed disciple-making strategy to DBC for approval.

Equipping selected adults from LifePoint Church, Smyrna, Tennessee, with gender-based group disciple-making skills

Author
Eddie Mosley
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected adults from LifePoint Church, Smyrna, Tennessee, with disciple-making skills for gendered-based groups. Equipping selected adults with disciple-making skills for gender-based groups will potentially address the need for multiplication of disciple groups. Making disciples through gender-based groups to know and understand scripture will strengthen the individuals in their pursuit to be more like Christl. Disciple-making will become a key practice to help LifePoint attendees grow spiritually and multiply disciples. The project director used an equipping model with three phases to accomplish this project. Phase one of the equipping model was to research several different models of disciple-making, including small groups, Sunday School, gender-based groups, and mentoring, in order to discover common skills used to produce disciples. Phase two consisted of the project director synthesizing the skills discovered in the research into a training course. Phase three was the training workshop with selected adults. The project evaluation confirmed the project equipped the selected adults with disciple-making skills needed for gender-based groups.

From Apathy to Mission: A Critical Transition for Pastors and Leaders of Faithful, Yet Changing Congregations

Author
Dale R Stiles
Abstract
Throughout the researcher's 20 years of ordained ministry in the Lutheran Church he has continually been interested in the critical role effective biblical discipleship practices have on the 21st century church as well as the church of the future. It is evident in many communities of faith and among individual believers that there is a problematic lack of passion, urgency, and interest in faithfully carrying out one's call to discipleship. For this project five individual congregations and their pastors were studied and assessed as models that have bridged the gap from apathy to mission and from casual observer to faithful disciple. Data was gathered through general observation, open-ended questionnaires, face-to-face interviews, and surveys. Through grounded theory and a phenomenological approach to research, core concepts that can aid communities of faith in bridging the gap from apathy to mission were identified.
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