Clergy--Training

Developing a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association

Author
Clarence Ross III
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director researched literature on leader self-awareness strategies currently practiced in ministry and corporate business organizations for recommended competencies and behaviors for self-aware leaders. The project director examined the level of self-aware leadership among pastors in South Carolina Baptist churches and the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director developed a self-aware leadership survey based on six areas of self-awareness. The project director based these six areas on the research; they include taking the initiative, composure when working with others, the balance between personal and work life, accurate picture of strengths and weaknesses, leadership development, an spiritual leadership and maturity. From the research the project director summarized the self-aware leadership competencies pastors need to become self-aware leaders. He then presented the research to the leadership team of the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The leadership team approved a self-aware leadership development process for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association.

AN EDUCATION SURVEY OF THE ASOCIACIÓN DE IGLESIAS BÍBLICAS COSTARRICENSES PASTORS

Author
Steven Charles Lucas D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the formal and non-formal education experiences and perceived educational needs of the pastors of the Asociación de Iglesias Bíblicas Costarricenses (AIBC). The AIBC is an association of 170 Bible churches led by 131 pastors throughout Costa Rica that arose out of the Latin American Mission in 1945.
A descriptive survey was used to collect the data relevant to the research questions. It was hypothesized that the results would show little to no improvement compared to data culled from a 1999 study which revealed that among AIBC pastors 13% reported completing high school, 32% were in or had been to a Bible Institute, and 20% were in or had been to seminary.
The findings indicated that there had been significant improvement among the member pastors in both formal secular education and formal ministry education. Participation in non-formal ministry education was high as expected. However, satisfaction in the quality of ministry education varied widely among areas of ministry training and from institution to institution. There remains ample room for improvement in both the formal and non-formal education sectors, especially in the areas of church administration/finance, counseling, and evangelism.
The study concludes with specific recommendations for the AIBC.

Caring for warriors : ministry to remotely piloted aircrew, moral injury and just war

Author
Joel D. Kornegay
Abstract
The objective of this project was to create training materials for Air Force chaplains serving the remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) community focusing on caring for individuals dealing with moral injury. The author interviewed pilots and sensor operators to assess their moral, ethical and religious perspectives on war and killing. Additionally, the author interviewed psychologists and an ethicist with experience in the RPA community. These interviews, along with extensive study of scholarly works, enabled the author to develop a training curriculum for chaplains as well as a briefing for RPA aircrew to effectively care for warriors wrestling with moral injury.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Wesley and Loyola : paths of spiritual formation

Author
Olga Kobzeva
Abstract
This project compares the early Wesleyan and Ignatian spiritual traditions and develops a system of spiritual growth for contemporary seminary students based on these two spiritual traditions. The project utilizes case study methods, direct observations and feedback from participants. It demonstrates how a training course could become a helpful tool in theoretical and practical spiritual preparation of Methodist leaders and revealed the complementary character of the spiritual methods of Loyola and Wesley with the emphasis on a systematic approach to spiritual formation and consciously practiced methods for spiritual growth.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

The development and testing of a curriculum for inquiry-based leadership in the Ecclesia Network for the advancement of God's mission

Author
James Rodney (J.R.) Briggs
Abstract
The purpose of this research project is to create, implement, and test an inquiry-based curriculum within churches in The Ecclesia Network in order to evaluate and equip leaders in churches across the United States. The researcher selected six groups in different regions of the United States to conduct surveys, interviews, and small group meetings to evaluate the effectiveness, fruitfulness, and clarity of the inquiry-based curriculum Asking Better Questions. This paper presents the process and the results of this evaluative study. The results offer recommendations for improvement and refinement of the Asking Better Questions curriculum. Kingdom communities who ask wise, compassionate, courageous questions will be the ones leading us into the future to the glory of God.

The Impact of a Staff Performance Management System on Performance Outcomes and Employee Commitment in a Private, Christian, Higher Education Institution

Author
Janis Lynn Ryder D.Min.
Abstract
This thesis explored performance management in a private, Christian, Canadian, higher education institution. A Model for Effective Performance Management was developed which served as a framework for a participatory action research project that piloted a staff performance review process and tool aimed at improving employee performance and organizational commitment of university staff employees. Seven university departments were part of the pilot project which included participating in supervisor training, testing a new performance review process and tool, and providing post-pilot feedback.
Post-pilot online survey results and interviews with leaders demonstrated a higher rate of completed performance reviews, increased competency and comfort level of supervisors/appraisers to lead performance review conversations, and increased employee commitment and performance resulting from the performance review experience.
There are opportunities for HR professionals, churches, and para-church organizations to use and benefit from this research and the Model for Effective Performance Management.

Towards a Reformed Evangelical Program of Spiritual Formation at Ryle Seminary, Ottawa

Author
Shaun Minett Turner D.Min.
Abstract
In this research portfolio the author seeks to articulate a form of reformed-evangelical spiritual formation and apply it to ministry formation training in both military and civilian ministry training contexts. The author sees spiritual formation as stripping off the old self and putting on the new self by looking to Jesus. Research is presented which shows that this formation often leads to greater resilience in ministry and life, as well as an increased awareness of, and dependence on, God’s sovereign grace, leading to a deeper sense of discerning God’s voice every day. The author used three parts: a personal spiritual autobiography, a model of spiritual formation in the reformed-evangelical tradition, and a field research project using appreciative inquiry to develop an integrated spiritual formation program at a reformed-evangelical seminary in Ottawa, Canada. The author was successful in using an appreciative approach to engage the students of the Seminary to design a program that was accepted by an expert panel of school administration, denominational leadership, and student leadership. This research portfolio provides both a practical model of spiritual formation in the reformed-evangelical tradition and a means of tailoring this model, through appreciative inquiry, to specific contexts.

Resiliency-Based Spiritual Support: A Preventative Approach Empowering Spiritual Resiliency in Clinical Pastoral Education Students at Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina

Author
Michael Gross
Abstract
Resiliency-Based Spiritual Support: A Preventative Approach was designed to empower a minister's spiritual resiliency practices. These practices allow him/her to courageously navigate the seasons of ministry and bounce back from stressful experiences. The six-week curriculum intervention for clinical pastoral education participants involved control and intervention groups. It focused on five spiritual resiliency themes (community, hope, sound of the genuine, meditation, stewardship) and related spiritual resiliency practices. Research methods included quantitative and qualitative instruments. Post-training evaluation scores evidenced participants were empowered by a greater understanding of the biblical/theological foundations and exploration of practices. Participants did recommend spiritual resiliency training for clergy.

A Phenomenology of Authentic Leadership

Author
Joshua James Tilley D.Min.
Abstract
Objective: To grasp the characteristics and essence of authentic leadership as seen and experienced through the lives of those who have served under and/or over those they perceive and identify as “authentic” or “high quality” leaders.

Method: A literary review and a biblical review were conducted to establish the current scholarship related to authentic leadership. A new phenomenological study was conducted in October of 2018. 12 individuals were interviewed either in person, by phone, or via a video chat.
Results: The result was a literary study, a biblical review, and a new phenomenological study of authentic leadership.

Conclusions: Through the phenomenology and subsequent qualitative research, the researcher came to the conclusion that authentic leadership is provided, felt, and acted upon in different ways by different people in different cultures, but the one universal essence of authentic leadership is the paradox of “relief” and “peace” preceded by a sense of “anxiety” and “pressure,” which is provoked within the follower by the leader. Trust is built through the process.
A model of existential peace is offered to demonstrate this meaning, but no model for creating an authentic leadership is presented as a phenomenology does not provide the groundwork needed to establish such a theory. All cultures represent leadership in different ways, so further research would need to be conducted to create such a model.

Preaching Post-Disaster: An Examination of Preaching and Preachers in the Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

Author
Trent Henderson D.Min.
Abstract
Preaching in a post-disaster context is one of the most challenging assignments for a pastor. Throughout the Scriptures and history, there are multiple examples of those who were called to that challenging and lonely task. This project developed a framework for preaching in the post-disaster context, based on analysis of sermons preached on the Sunday following the 2017 landfall of Hurricane Harvey in Texas and interviews of the pastors who preached those sermons. This project also includes analysis and synthesis of data from surveys. As part of the framework constructed, suggested sermon outlines are included for preachers facing this daunting task.
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