Clergy--Appointment, call

The Development of 1st Generation Pastors for Leadership in Independent Churches in Andhra Pradesh, India

Author
Manikanta Sai Ankem D.Min.
Abstract
This major project was designed to address the challenges that the first-generation emerging pastors/leaders go through to emerge as pastors and leaders within the independent churches of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is also designed to address the issue of favoritism and nepotism on developing the emerging leaders, and succession in those churches.

Among the independent churches, it seems, only the senior pastors’ progenies are the successors. It seems, there is no place for the first-generation emerging pastors/leaders to be developed for the senior pastorate of the independent churches. Not developing first-generation emerging pastors/leaders is a threat to the growth of Christianity in India. It is also not the New Testament model of training and developing first-generation pastors/leaders.

In the first section, the researcher dealt with the sociological issues and the cultural hierarchies that are contributing towards not developing the first-generation emerging pastors. In dealing with these issues, the researcher used the literature available and provided a biblical response. Also, the researcher showed biblical insight regarding the way of training and developing the first-generation pastors/leaders.

In the second section, the researcher used a qualitative method, doing in-depth interviews. The interviewees consisted of two groups of people – senior pastors of the independent churches who are close to handing on the baton of leadership; the second, first-generation emerging pastors who are in the process of emerging as pastors.

The findings of this research affirmed that the first-generation emerging pastors went through (and are going through) many challenges such as lack of proper guidance, support, training, mentor relationship, and trust from their senior pastors. There are also favoritism and nepotism issues along with insecurities of the senior pastors and lack of biblical knowledge on how to train and develop the first-generation emerging pastors/leaders without showing hierarchy and favoritism.

The importance of reading congregational culture for effective church leadership

Author
Edwin Eng Wei Wong
Abstract
This project paper seeks to provide practical tools to help pastors and leaders understand congregational culture to effectively lead their ministries. Drawing pointers from the servant-leadership practices of Nehemiah as well as other resources, the author formulates approaches to managing transition and leading change. Recommendations, based on broad observations from a survey on a small group of itinerant pastors in Singapore, are subsequently drawn.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

The Transitional Intentional Interim Ministry Specialist (TIIMS) and the spiritual growth of the congregation

Author
Mary Catherine Miller
Abstract
The Transitional Intentional Interim Minister Specialist(TIIMS) process should include actively assessing the spiritual well-being of and the taking of intentional steps to impact the spiritual climate/system of churches served by TIIMS. This project intentionally used Lectio Davina, Bible studies, and a sermon series based upon sermons by John Wesley to nurture the spiritual well-being of the TIIMM’s church. The TIIMS recommends adding the question, “How goes it with their soul?” to the Analyze the System section of the TIIMSA Process Tasks. It will take time to see if this project impacts the system/climate.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Lesson plan for stability : an examination of the long-term pastorate

Author
John M. McCay III
Abstract
The author examined how long-term tenures can be beneficial in the United Methodist Church's itinerant system. He reflected on the works from theologians such as Scott Jones, Henry Rack, Laceye Warner, Ted Campbell and Lovett Weems, along with The Rule of St. Benedict. Through the interviews of twelve church members from a variety of congregations, seven long-term tenured clergy members and two District Superintendents gained input from the pew to the pulpit on the advantages and disadvantages of long-term pastorates. The author then produced a lesson plan for pastors who find themselves or desire to be in a long-term pastorate.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Formed in the itinerancy : shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the Susquehanna Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
James Patrick Bohanan
Abstract
This project focuses on itinerancy in The United Methodist Church as a practice, in the life of the writer, and in the stories of multiple clergy interviewed and surveyed. The narrative research concentrates on the Susquehanna Conference of The United Methodist Church, though it also includes clergy from eleven other annual conferences. Five bishops and one general church executive were interviewed. The writer offers a theology of the itinerancy and encourages itinerant clergy to contemplate how they have been shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the context of their itinerancy.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

RENEWING THE PRESBYTERY: LISTENING TO COMMISSIONED RULING ELDERS

Author
Samuel Lapsley Pendergrast D.Min.
Abstract
In Utica Presbytery we have eleven Commissioned Ruling Elders (CREs) serving twelve congregations out of thirty in the presbytery. I interviewed twelve CREs who are currently serving or who have served as pastors to learn about their experience and how they evaluate their work, training, and relationship with colleagues in the presbytery. The interview results were categorized, then the group of CREs discussed the results. We developed recommendations for the presbytery in a variety of areas. In the report I interpret the results in light of pastoral theology and the history of ordination. Questions for further study emerge concerning the difference between seminary-trained pastors and commissioned elders, presbytery mission strategy for using CREs, and contextual theological education.

Navigating organizational and leadership challenges as an assistant pastor, serving in an interim pastoral role

Author
Joel David Hathaway
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how assistant pastors navigate challenges of adaptive leadership when the church loses its senior pastor, and the assistant pastor is expected to lead through the transition. A qualitative research methodology was employed to explore the scope of this topic. This study found that the exiting senior pastor, existing assistant/interim pastor, incoming senior pastor, and congregation all play active roles in guaranteeing success during pastoral transitions. This sh1dy also identified steps churches and pastors can take to retire outdated leadership models while integrating collaborative leadership methods that prepare congregations for periods of transition.

"There's a gift in it" transplanted vocational ministers and the quest for belonging to Vancouver, British Columbia

Author
Michael N Hsu
Abstract
Vancouver, British Columbia has a reputation as one of the most desirable cities in the world to live, yet a recent study revealed it to be a city where people struggle to develop belonging. The purpose of this study was to explore how transplanted vocational ministers developed a sense of belonging to the city. The study utilized a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and the data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. The study revealed the importance of taking initiative in a place like Vancouver and that the difficult experience of dislocation offered a relational gift and opportunity for mission and service.

An account of our stewardship: assessing Christian character from a Wesleyan perspective in ministry candidates in the East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
Joseph T Burkhardt
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to discover the extent to which the interview process of District Committees on Ordained Ministry (dCOMs) in the East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church integrates historical Wesleyan marks of Christian character in the assessment of ministry candidates. The project design was to distribute an online survey to all East Ohio Conference dCOM members in February 2015. The project revealed that dCOMs regularly inquire of ministry candidates about their experience of conversion, and tend to prefer more subjective expressions of personal faith journeys over more traditional Wesleyan understandings of justification.

Last Call: A New Practice of Receiving a Pastor in the Baptist Church Based Upon a Biblical Paradigm that Challenges the Call System

Author
Harold Eugene Vann II
Abstract
Baptist polity operationalizes the call system, a process that congregational churches use to select, elect and deselect pastors. An aspect of that polity is autonomy that declares each local Baptist church is a self-governing entity. In this context, lay authority has the potential to be misused and the laity can deselect a pastor at their will. This project, a case study is the presentation of a church to show how the call system works from candidacy to deselection. This study calls for an additional layer of pastoral oversight and recommends that pastors lead Baptist laity in securing pastors. The problem addressed by this project is imbalance in power and authority held by Baptist laity and manifested in the call system. Finally, a new plan is presented for receiving a pastor that is led by a Board of Pastors, which restores balance, and is built on a theological/biblical paradigm that indicates that God gives and sends pastors that are received by a congregation.
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