Clergy

Ministry Context Exegete, Leadership Philosophy and a Model for Teaching Pastors the Pure Gospel in a Prosperity Gospel Context

Author
Darlington Ejikeme Elekwa Dr D.Min.
Abstract
This portfolio consists of three key parts namely; exegetic consideration of the researcher’s ministry context, his leadership philosophy and a model for teaching pastors the pure gospel in a prosperity gospel context. There is a dearth of trained pastors in the researcher’s ministry context. Rampant miss-interpretation of the Bible is a common place in Jos. These facts informed the need for pastors training. The collective wisdom of participants was utilized to develop strategies for training pastors to preach the pure gospel rather than a different gospel (Galatians 1:6,7).
Data collected from a two-day research workshop, participants’ observations, participant’s interviews, extra information volunteered by two participants and workshop evaluations were subjected to open coding, selective coding, axial and in-vivo coding. Analyzed data showed dinner table training model, cell phone correspondence course model, customized coaching and mentoring would be beneficial for training pastors.

A Mentoring Program for Pastoral Interns at Calvary Baptist Church, Watertown, WI

Author
Robert Loggans D.Min.
Abstract
The rationale for this project emerged from a significant need to encourage, promote, develop and train young men preparing for pastoral ministry in the local church setting. While the college and seminary classroom experience is of great value, the practical application of such knowledge under the tutelage of an experienced pastor helps to complete the preliminary preparation for pastoral ministry.

God's call to pastoral ministry is unique and individualized; the call to serve is a call to prepare. The Apostle Paul invested much time in his young protégé Timothy. Paul eventually gave the following characterization of Timothy, "For I have no man likeminded, who will naturally care for your state." (Philippians 4:20KJV)

This project (1) states the purpose of investing in those preparing for pastoral ministry, (2) provides theological and Biblical rationale for internships, (3) looks at and considers contemporary literature on internships and mentoring, (4) explains the design and methodology used in the project, (5) develops a narrative of the course of the project, (6) And shares the outcomes and suggestions for intentional mentoring internships in the local church setting.

Several significant findings indicate that internships are vitally important in preparing for pastoral ministry. Those preparing for pastoral ministry often desire an experienced pastor to make a significant investment in their lives. I have found that many pastors deeply desire to share their life and ministry experiences with those who are younger. Mentoring takes time, flexibility and understanding as each individual preparing for pastoral ministry is special and unique. It is a delightful privilege and joy to have part in preparing students for ministry.

Language for Effective Preaching: Practical Guide for Fidei Donum Priests in the Belleville Diocese

Author
Urban Chidi Osuji D.Min.
Abstract
ABSTRACT

LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE PREACHING
PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR FIDEI DONUM PRIESTS
IN THE BELLEVILLE DIOCESE

Urban Osuji, Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis, Missouri.

Culture is an inherited conception that has to do with what a person learns from the parents, others, and the society about what it means to be a human being. As a child grows in the society, the child learns the culture’s general assumptions about family relations, relations between men and women, attitude towards life and death. A child learns these assumptions from parents and caregivers. There are other cultural expressions including table manners and the distribution of chores. Of all these inherited conceptions, language is the most symbolic of them all.
Language as an essential part of preaching is the subject of this thesis. The hypothesis is that Fidei Donum Priests can be effective Preachers by attending to the linguistic idioms, imageries, phrases, and sentence construction of the local congregation. The language of preaching is the concrete language of everyday life. Preaching language is the language that the children hear and understand and when they do not understand, their mothers offer a simpler understanding of the language with stories and imageries. Stories and imageries create and leave impressions on the emotional life of the people. When Priests use stories, imageries, and metaphors in preaching, listeners identify God’s presence in their midst. And that is why concrete imageries are the best tools for preaching.
But the use of concrete language in preaching does not come easy to the missionaries. Therefore, Fidei Donum Priests must immerse themselves by taking time to go to the people, live among them, share their lives and learn their language, including imageries, metaphors, and stories that have significant value for them.

Developing a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association

Author
Clarence Ross III
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director researched literature on leader self-awareness strategies currently practiced in ministry and corporate business organizations for recommended competencies and behaviors for self-aware leaders. The project director examined the level of self-aware leadership among pastors in South Carolina Baptist churches and the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director developed a self-aware leadership survey based on six areas of self-awareness. The project director based these six areas on the research; they include taking the initiative, composure when working with others, the balance between personal and work life, accurate picture of strengths and weaknesses, leadership development, an spiritual leadership and maturity. From the research the project director summarized the self-aware leadership competencies pastors need to become self-aware leaders. He then presented the research to the leadership team of the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The leadership team approved a self-aware leadership development process for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association.

AN EDUCATION SURVEY OF THE ASOCIACIÓN DE IGLESIAS BÍBLICAS COSTARRICENSES PASTORS

Author
Steven Charles Lucas D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the formal and non-formal education experiences and perceived educational needs of the pastors of the Asociación de Iglesias Bíblicas Costarricenses (AIBC). The AIBC is an association of 170 Bible churches led by 131 pastors throughout Costa Rica that arose out of the Latin American Mission in 1945.
A descriptive survey was used to collect the data relevant to the research questions. It was hypothesized that the results would show little to no improvement compared to data culled from a 1999 study which revealed that among AIBC pastors 13% reported completing high school, 32% were in or had been to a Bible Institute, and 20% were in or had been to seminary.
The findings indicated that there had been significant improvement among the member pastors in both formal secular education and formal ministry education. Participation in non-formal ministry education was high as expected. However, satisfaction in the quality of ministry education varied widely among areas of ministry training and from institution to institution. There remains ample room for improvement in both the formal and non-formal education sectors, especially in the areas of church administration/finance, counseling, and evangelism.
The study concludes with specific recommendations for the AIBC.

Church leadership and the crisis of theological identity

Author
Michael Drew Shelley
Abstract
The crisis of leadership supposedly ravaging the Church in the 21st century obscures a deeper crisis of theological identity in which churches, pastors, and lay leaders have forgotten who they are, the home to which they belong, and the mission to which God calls them. The presenting symptoms of this crisis of identity are pastors and churches stuck in places of ineffectiveness, hopelessness, unhealthy expectations of each other, and general malaise. The project for renewed pastoral and lay leadership at Crossville FUMC has focused on the means of grace by which the Triune God creates the being of the church and from which emerge the corresponding practices of leadership which prepare the congregation for its ministry in the community. Pastors and people reclaim their identity by engaging the crisis of identity through theological questions of identity, “Who is God who creates the Church?” And, “who are we as the Church before God?” In so doing, churches clarify their identity as disciples of Jesus claimed by God in our baptism, members of God’s household with a place at God’s Table, and a community of disciples forever called into God’s mission. . . .

[Note: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited. The abstract was shortened in length to adhere to the submission requirements.]

The Transitional Intentional Interim Ministry Specialist (TIIMS) and the spiritual growth of the congregation

Author
Mary Catherine Miller
Abstract
The Transitional Intentional Interim Minister Specialist(TIIMS) process should include actively assessing the spiritual well-being of and the taking of intentional steps to impact the spiritual climate/system of churches served by TIIMS. This project intentionally used Lectio Davina, Bible studies, and a sermon series based upon sermons by John Wesley to nurture the spiritual well-being of the TIIMM’s church. The TIIMS recommends adding the question, “How goes it with their soul?” to the Analyze the System section of the TIIMSA Process Tasks. It will take time to see if this project impacts the system/climate.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Lessons from Rwanda : moving through and beyond betrayal by clergy

Author
Kimberly A. Jackson
Abstract
Clergy and ministry leader betrayal negatively impacts people’s trust in the church and belief in God. To discern how we may move through and beyond such trauma, the author interviewed Rwandans who survived the 1994 genocide who knew of priests and nuns who betrayed churches in their care. The author then shared these findings with congregations in the United States who have been harmed by pastors or ministry leaders to determine if justice and mercy may enable their own journey towards forgiveness and reconciliation. The findings suggest repentance and atonement are key to forgiveness, whether reconciliation with perpetrators is possible.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Called to be wholy : loving God with our whole selves

Author
Rachel Radeline Gonia
Abstract
Clergy person are not healthy in wholistic ways. This paper examined whether pastors who engage in examining their own health through a wholistic framework while also establishing or strengthening a health ministry within in their congregations would increase their self-care. The pastors participated in a Day Apart and/or a covenant group. Their health measures were compared to those who did not participate in anything. The analysis suggests that pastors who participated in covenant groups and the day apart did increase their health measures while the connection to congregational health ministries was not clearly established.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Formed in the itinerancy : shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the Susquehanna Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
James Patrick Bohanan
Abstract
This project focuses on itinerancy in The United Methodist Church as a practice, in the life of the writer, and in the stories of multiple clergy interviewed and surveyed. The narrative research concentrates on the Susquehanna Conference of The United Methodist Church, though it also includes clergy from eleven other annual conferences. Five bishops and one general church executive were interviewed. The writer offers a theology of the itinerancy and encourages itinerant clergy to contemplate how they have been shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the context of their itinerancy.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]
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