Clergy

Developing a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association

Author
Clarence Ross III
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a self-awareness leadership strategy for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director researched literature on leader self-awareness strategies currently practiced in ministry and corporate business organizations for recommended competencies and behaviors for self-aware leaders. The project director examined the level of self-aware leadership among pastors in South Carolina Baptist churches and the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The project director developed a self-aware leadership survey based on six areas of self-awareness. The project director based these six areas on the research; they include taking the initiative, composure when working with others, the balance between personal and work life, accurate picture of strengths and weaknesses, leadership development, an spiritual leadership and maturity. From the research the project director summarized the self-aware leadership competencies pastors need to become self-aware leaders. He then presented the research to the leadership team of the Three Rivers Baptist Association. The leadership team approved a self-aware leadership development process for pastors in the Three Rivers Baptist Association.

AN EDUCATION SURVEY OF THE ASOCIACIÓN DE IGLESIAS BÍBLICAS COSTARRICENSES PASTORS

Author
Steven Charles Lucas D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the formal and non-formal education experiences and perceived educational needs of the pastors of the Asociación de Iglesias Bíblicas Costarricenses (AIBC). The AIBC is an association of 170 Bible churches led by 131 pastors throughout Costa Rica that arose out of the Latin American Mission in 1945.
A descriptive survey was used to collect the data relevant to the research questions. It was hypothesized that the results would show little to no improvement compared to data culled from a 1999 study which revealed that among AIBC pastors 13% reported completing high school, 32% were in or had been to a Bible Institute, and 20% were in or had been to seminary.
The findings indicated that there had been significant improvement among the member pastors in both formal secular education and formal ministry education. Participation in non-formal ministry education was high as expected. However, satisfaction in the quality of ministry education varied widely among areas of ministry training and from institution to institution. There remains ample room for improvement in both the formal and non-formal education sectors, especially in the areas of church administration/finance, counseling, and evangelism.
The study concludes with specific recommendations for the AIBC.

Church leadership and the crisis of theological identity

Author
Michael Drew Shelley
Abstract
The crisis of leadership supposedly ravaging the Church in the 21st century obscures a deeper crisis of theological identity in which churches, pastors, and lay leaders have forgotten who they are, the home to which they belong, and the mission to which God calls them. The presenting symptoms of this crisis of identity are pastors and churches stuck in places of ineffectiveness, hopelessness, unhealthy expectations of each other, and general malaise. The project for renewed pastoral and lay leadership at Crossville FUMC has focused on the means of grace by which the Triune God creates the being of the church and from which emerge the corresponding practices of leadership which prepare the congregation for its ministry in the community. Pastors and people reclaim their identity by engaging the crisis of identity through theological questions of identity, “Who is God who creates the Church?” And, “who are we as the Church before God?” In so doing, churches clarify their identity as disciples of Jesus claimed by God in our baptism, members of God’s household with a place at God’s Table, and a community of disciples forever called into God’s mission. . . .

[Note: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited. The abstract was shortened in length to adhere to the submission requirements.]

The Transitional Intentional Interim Ministry Specialist (TIIMS) and the spiritual growth of the congregation

Author
Mary Catherine Miller
Abstract
The Transitional Intentional Interim Minister Specialist(TIIMS) process should include actively assessing the spiritual well-being of and the taking of intentional steps to impact the spiritual climate/system of churches served by TIIMS. This project intentionally used Lectio Davina, Bible studies, and a sermon series based upon sermons by John Wesley to nurture the spiritual well-being of the TIIMM’s church. The TIIMS recommends adding the question, “How goes it with their soul?” to the Analyze the System section of the TIIMSA Process Tasks. It will take time to see if this project impacts the system/climate.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Lessons from Rwanda : moving through and beyond betrayal by clergy

Author
Kimberly A. Jackson
Abstract
Clergy and ministry leader betrayal negatively impacts people’s trust in the church and belief in God. To discern how we may move through and beyond such trauma, the author interviewed Rwandans who survived the 1994 genocide who knew of priests and nuns who betrayed churches in their care. The author then shared these findings with congregations in the United States who have been harmed by pastors or ministry leaders to determine if justice and mercy may enable their own journey towards forgiveness and reconciliation. The findings suggest repentance and atonement are key to forgiveness, whether reconciliation with perpetrators is possible.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Called to be wholy : loving God with our whole selves

Author
Rachel Radeline Gonia
Abstract
Clergy person are not healthy in wholistic ways. This paper examined whether pastors who engage in examining their own health through a wholistic framework while also establishing or strengthening a health ministry within in their congregations would increase their self-care. The pastors participated in a Day Apart and/or a covenant group. Their health measures were compared to those who did not participate in anything. The analysis suggests that pastors who participated in covenant groups and the day apart did increase their health measures while the connection to congregational health ministries was not clearly established.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Formed in the itinerancy : shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the Susquehanna Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church

Author
James Patrick Bohanan
Abstract
This project focuses on itinerancy in The United Methodist Church as a practice, in the life of the writer, and in the stories of multiple clergy interviewed and surveyed. The narrative research concentrates on the Susquehanna Conference of The United Methodist Church, though it also includes clergy from eleven other annual conferences. Five bishops and one general church executive were interviewed. The writer offers a theology of the itinerancy and encourages itinerant clergy to contemplate how they have been shaped as disciples, authorized as pastors, and sent as missionaries in the context of their itinerancy.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Clergy traveling companions : perichoresis and clergy discipleship in community

Author
Heather M. Baker-McAllister
Abstract
Clergy Traveling Companions examines issues surrounding clergy crises. Crises may be sexual boundary violations or actions resulting from depression or anxiety. The researcher critiques current supervisory practices within The United Methodist Church. The practices include the use of cluster groups and managerial supervision provided by the District Superintendent. The
researcher proposes that perichoresis and an understanding of God as community offers a lens to understand the needs of clergy. This need creates a space for the clergy person to live into their own Christian discipleship. The project developed and tested a mechanism through which clergy might experience accountable discipleship community.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Practicing Sabbath to Reduce Stress Among Ministers in the Tyger River Baptist Association, Spartanburg, South Carolina

Author
James Hailstock
Abstract
The Sabbath is the zenith of God’s creation and the climax of living. The key to reducing stress among ministers is the Sabbath lifestyle which includes practicing the disciplines of prayer, silence, feasting and fellowshipping in addition to identifying the signs and symptoms of stress. The Sabbath lifestyle empowers ministers with coping skills that can be personalized and implemented consistently as they progress and deal with the daunting demands and responsibilities of ministry. This project tested and compared the stress levels of the research and control groups before and after teaching four courses (disciplines) in the context of a Sabbath lifestyle to the research group only. During the retreat, four activities relative to the four courses were practiced by the research and control groups to determine if the courses had an impact on the activities to reduce stress among ministers. The project also revealed the effectiveness of the instructor, research site, courses, retreat, and activities. The project revealed strengths, weaknesses, and missteps. The results established that the courses did influence the activities to reduce stress among ministers.

BREAKING FREE FROM PERSONALITY-DRIVEN MINISTRY

Author
Steve Tomlinson D.Min.
Abstract
This major project, Breaking Free from Personality-Driven Ministry, investigates the tendency of pastors of evangelical churches to develop a cult of personality around their ministry. The project considers the biblical mandate to pursue humility, exegeting both narrative and didactic passages from the New and Old Testament, and then considers secular and Christian literature on the topic of humility and leadership. The field research includes qualitative and quantitative data seeking the perspectives of both clergy and lay leaders on what effective, humble leadership should look like and evaluates the responses in light of the biblical material and literature studied. The conclusion of the project is that humble, non-personality-driven church ministry is not only possible but should be pursued in a context of team leadership, accountability, and personal disciplines. Central to the project's findings is the need for a leader to nurture and pursue a gospel-focused vision.
Subscribe to Clergy