Church work with young adults

Engaging Millennials: The Quest to Revive their Participation and Commitment at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Gastonia, NC

Author
Kimberly Moore
Abstract
There are times when a church can have the look of success, but the zeal of that ministry is slowly diminishing. The older generation continues to do their best to keep ministry viable and moving, but there is a younger generation who does not see the importance of committing to anything beyond the Sunday morning experience. Through a series of Bible studies, sermons, outreach and moments of fellowship, this project engages the millennial generation and discovers ways to move them toward some level of commitment and participation within the Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Gastonia, NC. It is becoming more and more evident that we are dealing with a different generation of believers. This millennial generation loves God, but they do not care for tradition or routine. They are more tasks driven than program driven. Therefore, we must provide opportunities for them to serve based upon present need versus long-term desire.

EQUIPPING CHRISTIAN EDUCATION WORKERS TO SERVE AUTISTIC AND DEVELOPMENTALLY DELAYED CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES

Author
Kelvin Roberts D.Min.
Abstract
There are currently gaps that exist in how the church provides support and spiritual formation for autistic children and those with other similar developmental delays. The purpose of this project is to examine the gaps that exist in the church's support of children with special needs, and the impact that the church can have by serving and supporting this population.

Traditional theological views on autism and similar conditions as well the universal church views on these conditions were examined. One objective of this project was to determine the effect these views have on the church's ability to serve and support these families, as well as to determine the amount of education necessary to provide the congregation, staff, and church leadership.

Interviews were conducted with three different families of children with special needs who have made unsuccessful attempts to attend church services. Interviews of one social service organization and two churches already addressing these issues were also conducted.

A Delphi survey with five special education experts who are also Christians was administered to glean strategies from the public-school system in teaching these children and supporting their families. Finally, compiling this information, a training course was developed in conjunction with a special education field leader that is designed to train church staff on how to work with and support special needs children and their families. The development of this training module is the key finding of this project.

RESPONDING TO OUR HEMORRHAGING FAITH IN CANADA BY EXPLORING A FAMILY-INTEGRATED CHURCH MODEL AS A SOLUTION IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA

Author
Michael Thiessen D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to respond to the identified crisis in disciple-making by exploring the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a Family-Integrated-Church ministry model.
To accomplish this SWOT analysis, there were four steps to this research project: A literature review, Biblical research on the family, twelve semi-structured interviews with FEB pastors, and an elders’ review of our FIC model at Grace Baptist Church in Alliston, Ontario. By doing this research project, I hoped to understand this ministry model better and sought to focus our local church disciple-making practices.

The information gleaned from this research project confirmed for me some of what I already knew anecdotally; there is a crisis in children’s and young adult ministry of which the family is a key part of both the problem and solution. The next generation needs to be able to follow their parents, who are worshipping, praying, and serving before them, in order to be made into passionate disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Equipping selected members of Chinese Christian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with essential apologetic engagement skills

Author
William L Englehart
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip selected members of Chinese Christian Church of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with essential apologetic engagement skills. The project director researched the field of apologetics, chose five apologetic skills, and then prepared file lessons teaching the essential apologetic skills to a select group of college students and working professionals. The project director presented the material in five sessions. Prior to teaching the lessons, and apologetic expert reviewed and evaluated the research for the project, and a curriculum expert reviewed and evaluated the style and content of the curriculum. Those evaluation tools enabled the project director to create an effective resource for equipping young adults in essential apologetic skills.

Developing a strategy to assimilate millennials into First Baptist Church of Minneola, Minneola, Florida

Author
Timothy Glenn Burdick
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to provide First Baptist Church of Minneola, in Minneola, Florida, a strategy to assimilate millennials. First Baptist Church of Minneoloa is a sixty-year-old church that grew in membership during the late nineteen seventies into the nineteen nineties. After that period of growth, the church began to lose members. Through research and communication with a select group of church members, a four=part strategy proposal was created and presented to the church. The strategy focused on the church becoming more invitational, improving a guest’s first visit, changing stereotypical perceptions and perspectives, and hearing the concerns of millennial families. This project report also includes an evaluation of the project goals and personal goals of the project director.

Equipping Selected Adults of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, in Collegiate Disciple Making Skills

Author
Jason Scott McKinney
Abstract
The propose of this project was to equip selected adults of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, in collegiate disciple making skills. The project director researched the field of discipleship to better understand the best practices of training others to make disciples. The project director studied curriculum writing to enhance the teaching during eight training sessions. Then, the project director implemented the project by training selected members of First Baptist Church, Cookeville, Tennessee, with the best practices to disciple college students. The training seminar was taught on Friday night and the following Sunday morning. The participants were trained with disciple making skills.

A Quest for Koinonia: Uncovering Spiritual Practices that Inspire and Promote Unity among Christians within a Contemporary Campus Setting

Author
Diane Reneé Schmit Dardón D.Min.
Abstract
The quest for koinonia among Christians on college and university campuses -- and specifically at DePaul University in Chicago -- is at the heart of this thesis-project. Like so many campus settings throughout the United States, the Christian community at DePaul is complicated, diverse, and marked distinctly by distrust, skepticism, and conflict between Christian students and between Christian groups on campus. This thesis-project posits that spiritual practices inherent in the Body of Christ might encourage and inspire Christian unity on campus. Spiritual practices that emerge through explorations of the experiences and hopes of college students, major global ecumenical movements, and early followers of Christ in Corinth will be considered as a means for developing a pastoral response to the issue of conflict and dissension among Christians on campus and beyond. A brief foray into faith developmental theory, Millennial and post-Millennial generational studies, and ethnocentricity also provide helpful insights. The Practical Theology method and model developed by Evelyn and James Whitehead guide this thesis-project as the work strives to shed light on ways in which koinonia might be realized among Christians within a contemporary higher education setting.

A Discovery Project of Equine Assisted Therapy in Relationship to God

Author
Carissa Kay Henry
Abstract
A Discovery Project of Equine Assisted Therapy in Relationship to God by Carissa Kay Henry:
The purpose of this project was to discover the degree to which a select group of Christian therapists understands the ways in Equine Assisted Therapy (EAT) can mirror young adults' relationships with God. The discover project consisted of an assessment tool created and implemented for qualitative and quantitative responses.
The most prominent finding was the Christian therapists have the ability to view the relationships of young adults with God and see those relationships improve through Equine Assisted Therapy. Application and recommendations for further research are offered for consideration.

Fostering Hope Covenant Discipleship as a Vehicle to Connect Congregations and Young Adults Aging Out of Foster Care

Author
Bryan L Brooks
Abstract
Christian congregations can use small groups to build mutually nourishing connections among young adults aging out of foster care and church members. Working with a nearby foster care organization, the author adapted a traditional Wesleyan small group approach, Covenant Discipleship, to establish a cohort of congregants from his local church and young adults aging out of foster care, a population often overlooked by communities of faith. By flexibly applying Covenant Discipleship techniques and engaging the foster care residents as adults with power to shape the experience, a new model for connecting congregations and young adults transitioning from foster care emerged.

A study of spiritual healing and revival of youth fellowships through social network services focusing on young adult group of Wonju First Methodist Church

Author
Yongjoo Kwon
Abstract
The paper begins with the problem recognizing for the future of the church caused by the indifference about life in faith of the young adults in the church and the lack of community. When young people in a church are vital, the church becomes a dynamic church. For the reason, it is necessary to understand the importance of the young adults in the church. Young people today open and share their lives through the social networking service and are connected with others opening new communications. The church now needs to accept the culture of this era and to improve young people with programs utilizing social network services. In this paper, the author organizes the project with the purpose and constructs and implements programs using Facebook, and KakaoTalk, representatives of the contemporary social network service, with contents such as the Bible meditation and writing, gratitude sharing, intercessory prayer, and sharing Christian video clips and so on. In this persp ective, the author examines the change in life in faith and in community consciousness of young people.
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