Church work with students

DEVELOPING A STRATEGIC PLAN FOR CAMPUS MINISTRY TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AT CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY--ANN ARBOR

Author
Ryan Peterson D.Min.
Abstract
Concordia University, located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, has always had a strong commitment to a Christ-centered ministry. But with a changing student body and an awareness of the changing needs of the millennial generation, it is clear that deliberate and intentional planning for ministry is needed. This major project has sought to consider the historical issues surrounding campus ministry, as well as the theological and biblical issues that undergird the ministry, in order to develop a strategic plan for campus ministry to undergraduate students.

This project focused on achieving four primary goals. The first goal was seeking to understand the values, ideals, influences, and preferences of the millennial generation. The second goal was to identify the five to seven greatest spiritual challenges facing the students at Concordia University--Ann Arbor. The third goal was to analyze and synthesize the findings from the identified challenges and SWOT analysis. Finally, the fourth goal was to describe the strategic plan for campus ministry at Concordia University--Ann Arbor.

The field research focused on three specific areas: writing a campus culture narrative based on three student focus groups, completing a SWOT analysis of current campus ministry programming by students, faculty, and staff, and then identifying the specific spiritual challenges facing our current students through a Delphi survey. Finally, a strategic plan with strategies, objectives, and tactics was completed and presented to the president of the university for his approval. The effectiveness of the field research components was evaluated, and each of the four goals of the major project have been achieved.

EQUIPPING CHRISTIAN EDUCATION WORKERS TO SERVE AUTISTIC AND DEVELOPMENTALLY DELAYED CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES

Author
Kelvin Roberts D.Min.
Abstract
There are currently gaps that exist in how the church provides support and spiritual formation for autistic children and those with other similar developmental delays. The purpose of this project is to examine the gaps that exist in the church's support of children with special needs, and the impact that the church can have by serving and supporting this population.

Traditional theological views on autism and similar conditions as well the universal church views on these conditions were examined. One objective of this project was to determine the effect these views have on the church's ability to serve and support these families, as well as to determine the amount of education necessary to provide the congregation, staff, and church leadership.

Interviews were conducted with three different families of children with special needs who have made unsuccessful attempts to attend church services. Interviews of one social service organization and two churches already addressing these issues were also conducted.

A Delphi survey with five special education experts who are also Christians was administered to glean strategies from the public-school system in teaching these children and supporting their families. Finally, compiling this information, a training course was developed in conjunction with a special education field leader that is designed to train church staff on how to work with and support special needs children and their families. The development of this training module is the key finding of this project.

The Faith Pyramid Evangelism Strategy: A Tool for Integrating Apologetics into Evangelism Training for Middle School and High School Students

Author
Samuel Lee Dallas III D.Min.
Abstract
This research demonstrates that apologetics material integrated into evangelism training increases the personal confidence of middle and high school students in sharing their faith. The anonymous surveys of thirty teenagers involved in the research showed an overall 33 percent increase in confidence (on a self-scoring ten-point scale) after participating in such training. Additionally, an overall 49 percent increase resulted in their perceived abilities to answer challenging questions during evangelistic discussions.
Such measurements were also validated in practical application. Graded quizzes on apologetics-related questions taken by the students both before and after the training revealed an overall 98 percent increase in scores. Finally, the students showed an overall 91 percent increase in sharing their faith in the two months following the training compared to the two months prior. These numbers reveal not only improvement in self-perception, but objective measures make the case for the success of this ministry project.
Chapter 1 introduces the ministry need and thesis of the dissertation in response to the need. Additionally, a layout of the researcher’s Faith Pyramid Evangelism Strategy is introduced.
Chapter 2 provides a biblical and theological justification for integrating apologetics into evangelism training and provides a historical justification for such an approach.
Chapter 3 examines the specific goals of this research as it relates to the subjective measures of teenage evangelists, the knowledge the researcher has sought to teach the students, and the desirable goal for an increase in evangelism as a result of such training.
Chapter 4 reviews the specific training of the thirty middle and high school students completed in the weekend seminar. The lessons were arranged into five workshops, followed by a survey given to the students two months following the training.
Chapter 5 provides a conclusion via an in-depth evaluation of the ministry project, as well as suggestions for future plans in implementing such training.

A Discipleship Strategy to Prepare Chinese International Students to Re-enter China and Continue Following Christ

Author
Paul S Chi
Abstract
The discipleship strategy introduced in this dissertation was implemented at the Harvest Church of Madison located on the campus of the University of Wisconsin. The goal of this project was to develop a contextualized discipleship strategy for Chinese international students that prepares them for re-entry into their native country. Qualitative research was used to gain a better understanding of Chinese international students coming to the University of Wisconsin. It also served to assess the effectiveness of the discipleship strategy. The long-term success of this discipleship strategy is unverified. However, the research joins the conversation of churches and ministries trying to reach the enormous wave of Chinese international students studying in our campuses in the United States.

Developing a community needs assessment of at-risk students at Fyffe High School, Fyffe, Alabama

Author
Keith L Atchley
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop a community needs assessment of at-risk students in Fyffe High School in Fyffe, Alabama, for the purpose of making recommendations to Fyffe First Baptist Church (Fyffe FBC) on how to best minister to these students and their parents. Multiple forms of demographic data were considered in order to identify the age ranges, socio-economic status, and behaviors that contribute to students becoming at-risk. Interviews with local and state agencies along with local school officials were conducted to ascertain what forms of assistance are available to students and if any proactive interventions are in place to prevent students from slipping into the at-risk category. Research and surveys were conducted in order to discover and assess the age and grade level of students who can be most impacted by intervention and support strategies.

Fit to serve making seminaries models of health and wholeness

Author
Karen H Webster
Abstract
Given the current health crisis in the United States (in which the Church plays a part), this project identifies the main health issues impacting the masters-level degree students at Columbia Theological Seminary (Decatur, Georgia), while providing valuable insight into what the students believe the Church's role is in formulating effective theological and practical approaches to these various health issues. This project was conducted through an anonymous, online questionnaire and in-depth interviews with self-selected students. It concludes by offering five suggestions for what the author believes would have the greatest impact on improving the health and wellbeing of those who work and study in theological institutions so as to improve not only the health of future seminarians, but also as a way of improving the health of our current clergy, congregations, and beyond.

Equipping Selected Students from Shades Monutain Baptist Church, Vestavia Hills, Alabama, in Missional Living Skills

Author
S. Carson Browning
Abstract
This is a project in ministry aimed to equipp selected students from Shades Mountain Baptist Church in missional living skills aligning them with the mission of the church. This project involves researching the field of missional living, synthesizing the research into a listing of essential missional living skills, and creating an experiential curriculm through a one-day experience and seven day-long devotional readings.

Researching the major contemporary perspectives of soteriology among Southern Baptists in order to develop a curriculum for Texas Baptist students

Author
Leighton Charles Flowers
Abstract
The purpose of the project was to research the major contemporary perspectives pertaining to the biblical doctrine of salvation in order to create a student curriculum to effectively teach a non-Calvinistic Southern Baptist perspective. As a result of the research, a greater understanding of the soteriological issues and the various biblical interpretations was gained. The data was then compiled into a format that is easy to understand and engage. Modern teaching resources which have proven to be effective in training students were employed in developing the new curriculum. Evaluation of the soteriological content, curriculum effectiveness, and the overall growth of the project director were fundamental to the completion of this project.

Equipping a selected group of students at Airline Baptist Church, Bossier City, Louisiana in peer discipleship skills

Author
Thomas L Myers
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip a select group of students at Airline Baptist Church, Bossier City, Louisiana, in peer discipleship skills. The project director identified and enlisted students, ages thirteen to eighteen, who desired to enhance their understanding of discipleship skills and were active members of Airline Baptist Church. Using an equipping model, students were trained in basic discipleship skills and were then taught how to train other students. Students were trained in understanding their salvation and sharing their testimonies, reading Scripture within its context, studying the elements of prayer, serving in the local church, and equipping other students to do the same. The program director used research to develop teaching plans that were used in training the students. Evaluation of the project director's knowledge and effectiveness of the training occurred at the end of the training sessions. The project was assessed by comparing a pre-test with a post-test, course evaluation, role-play situations, and signing a commitment form.

Group spiritual direction among emerging adults

Author
David E MacDonald
Abstract
A field research report describing Merge, a group spiritual direction process among first year students at Ohio Northern, a United Methodist-related university. Merge sought to help emerging adults grow in faith, utilizing conversation, silence, reflection, and creative arts. Participants took part in nine weekly group sessions and a culminating retreat, during which they helped in planning for the future of Merge as a program of the religious life office at Ohio Northern. Growth was measured utilizing the Faith Maturity Scale. Merge was found to attract spiritually aware emerging adults who were seeking an outlet for spiritual growth in college.
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