Church work with immigrants

A HANDBOOK FOR PLANTING HISPANIC AMERICAN CHURCHES IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

Author
Braden E. Taylor D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry project examines the explosive growth of the Hispanic community in the United States and presents a handbook for planting Hispanic American churches in the southeastern U.S. We analyze the need and demonstrate the Biblical basis for planting churches among Hispanic Americans in this country.
We trace the history of what God has been doing among Hispanic Americans in North America, investigating the history of Latino Protestantism in the U.S. We consider the remarkable growth of Hispanic Evangelicals in this country, taking note of the marked influence of Pentecostal and Charismatic forms of Christianity. We study the demographics and great diversity of the U.S. Hispanic community, examine Hispanic cultural values, and consider challenges faced by this community and the U.S. Hispanic church.
We investigate a wide range of models for planting churches among Hispanic Americans, taking into account whether they are Spanish or English proficient. We investigate Hispanic church planting done by Latino, multicultural and Anglo churches, and examine Hispanic church models in Birmingham, Alabama and other cities. We also consider church models developed in response to demographic changes in the United States.
Finally, in our handbook for planting Hispanic American churches in the southeastern United States, we present fourteen practical steps to begin a Hispanic American congregation in our area. By following the steps laid out in this handbook, any group of believers, church, church planter or presbytery will have a better understanding of how to go about reaching Hispanics with the Gospel and gathering them into a new congregation of believers who love and serve the Lord together.

INCLUSION AND RELIGIOUS ENGAGEMENT IN A MULTICULTURAL CHURCH: A MULTI-CASE STUDY OF THE EXPERIENCE OF IMMIGRANT FILIPINO VOLUNTEER CHURCH WORKERS IN SELECT CATHOLIC PARISHES IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF SEATTLE

Author
Frank Savadera D.Min.
Abstract
Savadera, Frank Dennis, B., D. Min. Seattle University, 2019. 201 pp.
Chair: Taylor, Mark Lloyd, PhD

This qualitative study investigates the relevant descriptions that first-generation immigrant Filipino volunteer church workers use to characterize their adopted multicultural parish. Further, it investigates how these descriptions influence their views on inclusion and religious engagement in their communities. The study hopes to generate faith and encourage theological reflections on: (1) persons’ capacities to encounter and embrace the “other”; (2) capacities for multiple-mindedness and recognition of a multiplicity of gifts; and (3) the call to embody and participate in the Trinitarian communion.
The central research questions asked are as follows: (1) How do first-generation immigrant Filipino volunteer parish workers in the Archdiocese of Seattle describe their experience of a multicultural context and how it affects their faith life and their view(s) of the church as an organization (i.e., in terms of church leadership, decision making, community dynamics, perspectives about the faith, programs/activities, etc.); (2) What personal values and dispositions do these immigrants believe positively/negatively affect their views of their parish as a multicultural organization; and (3) What does it mean for them to practice their religious culture in a multicultural setting? The research also asks these related questions: What recommendations would they suggest to members of organizations such as their respective parishes and the Seattle Archdiocese to help sustain involvement and participation in such multicultural contexts?
To study a phenomenon, i.e., a multicultural church, within multiple, bounded systems, this study uses a multi-case study design. Our cases consist of three groups, one representing each parish under study. The research employs a non-probability purposive sampling procedure, an interview protocol prescribed by Creswell (2006, 132), methods of field observation, archival documents, and relevant demographics.

From Joseph to Zaphnathpaaneah: A Theory and Practice of “Starting from Scratch” for Pastoral Leadership in Immigrant Churches
從約瑟到撒發那忒巴內亞:「從零開始」的移民教會教牧領導理論與實踐

Author
Yan Kwong Joshua Yeung M.Div.
Abstract
This paper is intended to explore Joseph’s life and career transformation. The phrase “from Joseph to Zaphnathpaaneah” includes situations like moving from his hometown to a foreign land, from having nothing to acquiring superior ability, skill, and maturity, thus accomplishing God’s plan for him, all "starting from scratch". When immigrant pastors come to North America and lead church of immigrants, they are, in a way, "starting from scratch". This paper further explores how immigrant pastors in churches of immigrants in North America can be a “Joseph” in their ministerial leadership by examining Joseph’s journey to become Zaphnathpaaneah, Egypt’s prime minister.

OPEN WOUND, OPEN TABLE: A THEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION OF HOLY COMMUNION AS PRACTICED BY THE BORDER CHURCH/LA IGLESIA FRONTERIZA

Author
Seth David Clark D.Min.
Abstract
This study explores the Border Church, which worships across the San Diego-Tijuana border fence at Friendship Park, and how its weekly bi-national, bilingual, nonsectarian communion service, intersects with the lived realities of its borderlands congregants. Through participant-witness ethnography of my congregation and five semi-structured, open-ended interviews, I examine how God is experienced in Christian practices, especially communion, at the border wall. I conclude that borderlands experiences are not monolithic, which counters false groupings of and “othering” tropes about migrants, deportees, and activists. I also theologize about unity amid division and how to make the bread of the table even more open.

Kan In Don Nah (All Are Welcome Here): A Framework for Developing Intercultural Worship Practice at First Chin Baptist Church of New Bern, North Carolina

Author
Janice Daynette Snead D.Min.
Abstract
The process of intercultural ministry across human boundaries is modeled throughout the ministry of Jesus Christ. Regardless of culture, the scriptures actively engage understanding of God’s Word for all the people and His love to reach each one. This project sought to encourage a biblical understanding of intercultural discipleship by guiding the worshiping community of First Chin Baptist Church through a four-week ministry project to welcome and worship with non-Chin guests. Through a series of study on John 21:1-17, the community discovered a new biblical and theological foundation for understanding and guiding non-Chin guests before, during, and after worship to develop a framework for intercultural worship practices at First Chin Baptist Church.

Moving from doing ministry for people to do ministry with people : a model developed for ministry approach

Author
Braulio Torres
Abstract
How can we intentionally move from doing ministry for people, to doing ministry with the people? This project presents an analytical process of a model developed as a way to help local churches focus their efforts on doing ministry with people. The model asks us to consider the activities of the local church using three components: biblical foundation, contextual focus, and practical application. The reader will discover that this model can be applied to any ministry endeavor.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Always step out in faith : sowing the seeds of sanctuary, solidarity, and hope in troubled times

Author
Walter J. Mark Knutson III
Abstract
We live in the midst of a global refugee crisis, with 68 million people displaced by violence, poverty, and hate. Twelve million vital members of our communities in the US are living in constant fear. Simultaneously, our nation demonizes immigrants by taking actions that viciously harm families while assaulting our core values as people of faith. Using the experience of Augustana Lutheran Church in Portland, Oregon, a Sanctuary Congregation since 1996, the author, who serves as pastor, designed a speaking and teaching process to inspire congregations and judicatories to publicly stand in solidarity with immigrants by embracing the Sanctuary movement.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Creating a Narrative Empathy Among Southern Baptist Leaders: Shaping a New Perception of Islam, the Prophet Muhammad and Jihad

Author
Charles Wesley Powell Dr. D.Min.
Abstract
The Southern Baptist denomination is the largest Protestant religious group in the United States. Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11 there has been an increase of negative rhetoric among Southern Baptists towards Muslims. This thesis-project asks to what extent a lack of narrative empathy towards Muslims can be altered in the life of the Southern Baptist leader thus enabling the leader, consequently the denomination, to better understand and communicate the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad as embodiments of spiritual discipline and peaceful living. The theoretical framework and in-depth qualitative interviews provide invaluable insights into the dynamics and use of anti-Islamic rhetoric among Southern Baptists. Concrete strategies of action are proposed, such as strategic personal encounters between Southern Baptists and Muslims which when combined with a better understanding of Islam can help uncover the Southern Baptist denominations preconceived prejudices and misunderstandings of Islam that so often hinder constructive dialogue. This project has crucial practical implications that has not yet received scholarly attention.

A study on the efficacy of pastoral care in the multicultural context of Korea

Author
Il Kim
Abstract
This study discusses the role of church in multicultural situation, especially for those who are hurt and suffered from discrimination. Further, examines practical and systematic pastoral caring and mission works through a church project. In the introduction, it talks about the purpose, topic and ultimate goal of the research, while body discusses details such as general understanding of multicultural families and current state of multicultural families in South Korea. Later, explains the tolerance of multicultural families through theoretical and biblical approaches and suggests Korean church's multicultural pastoral caring and missionary that is grounded of realistic correspondence and consideration.

Welcoming the Immigrant and Renewing the Church

Author
John D Kalz
Abstract
The project focuses on how existing congregations can experience renewal by welcoming immigrants into the worshiping community using Buechel United Methodist Church, Louisville, Kentucky, as a case study. The project was designed to enable pastoral and congregational leadership to lead changes that would help the congregation include persons from various immigrant communities in their neighborhood, with an eye to the spiritual, corporate renewal of the church. The research, using both attendance numbers and interviews, points to several practices that churches can use to experience new vitality through intentional outreach to immigrant communities.
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