Church work with immigrants

A study on the efficacy of pastoral care in the multicultural context of Korea

Author
Il Kim
Abstract
This study discusses the role of church in multicultural situation, especially for those who are hurt and suffered from discrimination. Further, examines practical and systematic pastoral caring and mission works through a church project. In the introduction, it talks about the purpose, topic and ultimate goal of the research, while body discusses details such as general understanding of multicultural families and current state of multicultural families in South Korea. Later, explains the tolerance of multicultural families through theoretical and biblical approaches and suggests Korean church's multicultural pastoral caring and missionary that is grounded of realistic correspondence and consideration.

Welcoming the Immigrant and Renewing the Church

Author
John D Kalz
Abstract
The project focuses on how existing congregations can experience renewal by welcoming immigrants into the worshiping community using Buechel United Methodist Church, Louisville, Kentucky, as a case study. The project was designed to enable pastoral and congregational leadership to lead changes that would help the congregation include persons from various immigrant communities in their neighborhood, with an eye to the spiritual, corporate renewal of the church. The research, using both attendance numbers and interviews, points to several practices that churches can use to experience new vitality through intentional outreach to immigrant communities.

A church ministry to nurture the middle-aged Hong Kong immigrants in Toronto Canada - Logos Baptist Church (Milliken) case study

Author
King C Ng
Abstract
This dissertation paper is focusing on the needs of the mid-age families who are mostly immigrants from Hong Kong. Facing the adaptation of the North American culture, these immigrates have to try hard to change their traditions in coping with the new ways of living. In the meantime, churches play an important role to help these immigrant families facing different challenges and needs which they have to encounter and resolve in this multi-cultural society. In response to this challenging world and the crisis of the mid-age immigrants, this dissertation suggests a 10-lessen curriculum which helps the mid-age families to understand their real self, the temptations they faced and the possible ways to help them grow in facing their future challenges.

It takes a church: the need for a visible, audible, understandable, and corporate Gospel witness to unreached British Asian communities

Author
Baz Moore
Abstract
Large numbers of South Asians have immigrated to the United Kingdom, and Christians have embraced a variety of outreach methods. Lacking has been an emphasis on church planting. The literature tends to focus on personal evangelism, creating a need to examine the role the church has in witness. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore how converted British Asian Christians evaluate the role of the local church in its witness to the British Asian community. This study concluded that contextualized church planting should be the primary strategy for witness to the unbelieving South Asian immigrant populations.

Exploring bilingual worship and preaching in the bicultural Korean context

Author
Sung Hwan Cho
Abstract
The author researched a possible alternative for connecting communities by redefining a Korean immigrant church in Washington, DC as a 'bicultural community.' First, the author researched biblical and theological implications through 1 Corinthians by defining a 'bicultural community.' Second, he evaluated the current bilingual way of preaching and whether it could support creating harmony between Korean members and other ethnic groups at the Alpha Korean Community Church in Washington, DC by interviewing co-pastors, distributing surveys, and receiving professional advice. The author believes that this bilingual approach will be a powerful example for pursuing harmony in immigrant churches and give strong insight for minority communities in a multicultural world.

Inviting Confucius to church: awareness of the missional strategies in the postmodern EFC

Author
Albany Fu-Jen Lee
Abstract
In the midst of the challenges the EFC (Evangelical Formosan Churches) are facing, the increasing demand of constructive interreligious dialogue with Confucian cultures offers an opportunity, forty years after its pioneer church was founded in downtown Los Angeles, to reshape and thrive in America, especially within the Confucian Chinese immigrant community. Through the change of evangelical ethos and attitude, the EFC has a pressing opportunity to present the gospel to an audience who believes in a system of social cohesiveness dependent upon personal virtue and self-control. For Confucius and the Confucian Chinese, society's harmony relies upon the appropriate behavior (li) of each individual within the social hierarchy. Confucianism's emphasis on practical ethics has led to a society governed by secular philosophy without the need of religion.

Becoming a multiethnic church when the world comes to your doorstep

Author
Joseph Paul Knight
Abstract
This thesis provides homogeneous congregations located in ethnically diverse settings with a theology and model for cross-cultural outreach and inclusion, especially those surrounded by immigrant communities flourishing with non-Christian religions. It relates the journey of an established white congregation reaching out to its diverse neighbors with Christ's love and bringing them into its fellowship. It describes five phases during those 10 years, each with its respective challenges and breakthroughs. It argues that multiethnic congregations constitute the New Testament ecclesiological norm rather than those formed by the homogeneous unit principle because they more fully express the nature of the church and its reconciling gospel and have a missional advantage in bridging to Hindu, Buddhist and Muslim populations who have migrated into their communities.

Marriage and family therapy for Korean immigrant families in the US

Author
Joon-hyuk Lim
Abstract
All couples have struggles in their marriage, and the difficulties of moving to a foreign country can exacerbate those struggles. Korean immigrants to the United States have specific challenges in their marriages and families. An understanding of the biblical view of marriage and family, combined with skills in marriage and family therapy can help counselors and pastors serve Korean immigrants and their families. This paper includes a case study which incorporates biblical values and marriage and family concepts as the author ministers to a Korean-American woman and her son.

The criminal, the alien, and the church: mass incarceration and immigrant criminalization from a Catholic perspective

Author
Charles W Bergman
Abstract
The author argues that patterns of harsh punishment and exclusion of immigrants and criminal offenders in the contemporary US reflects a racialized notion of membership in which communities of color are suspect. He examines the response of the US Catholic bishops through representatives documents and makes recommendations for stronger analytical and pastoral strategies to confront this crisis. The way forward for the church, the author suggests, lies in encouraging the participation and empowerment of affected persons and communities.
Subscribe to Church work with immigrants