Church growth

Identificación de Factores Que Contribuyen al Crecimiento de ta Sede Hispanohablante del Modelo Multisitio de Grace Church, in Greenville, Carolina del Sur.

Author
Robby Richard D.Min.
Abstract
El objetivo de la presente investigación es identificar los factores, desde la perspectiva del liderazgo de la iglesia, que contribuyen al crecimiento de la sede hispanohablante de Grace Church, en Greenville, Carolina del Sur, EE. UU., y, por ende, que contribuyen al alcance de la comunidad hispanohablante en su contexto con el evangelio.

El modelo de iglesia multisitio está formado por congregaciones que se consideran parte de una misma iglesia local y se reúnen en diferentes lugares geográficos y espacios físicos. A pesar de que no cuenta con una larga trayectoria de años, ya ha evidenciado signos positivos de eficacia para el alcance evangelístico de diversas comunidades pluriculturales. Estas huellas de competencia del modelo se hacen visibles en resultados observables en la experiencia práctica de su aplicación y en datos disponibles en diversas fuentes.

La presente investigación reveló que los factores propuestos en las hipótesis formuladas son, en efecto, válidos. Además, aportó información valiosa sobre otras dos características específicas del ámbito organizacional y eclesial que fortalecen la relación entre la sede hispanohablante y la iglesia anglohablante. Estas constituyen la base esencial para la efectividad de los elementos propuestos en las hipótesis.

Para aquellas iglesias que deseen implementar el modelo multisitio, es recomendable tomar en cuenta el entorno demográfico donde se desea abrir una sede, las características propias del tipo de la comunidad eclesial que se desea, y los principios únicos que cimientan toda comunidad hispana.

The effects of big picture presentations of the biblical story on the missional orientation of church goers

Author
Kyungsoo Kim
Abstract
Nearly a half-century of Christian scholarship points to the ongoing issue of missional deficiency within the Church, a pressing concern that coincides with Christianity’s observed decline in the West. Research on the subject indicates a widespread de-emphasis on God’s mission within Christian institutions, from churches great and small to the seminaries that train their leaders. This consequentially obstructs the missional development of individual believers, the true units of the Body of Christ, who were sent by Christ to carry out God’s mission and advance God’s Kingdom not only overseas, but in their local communities. Given this stagnant and self-defeating state of the Western Church, a remedy that restores the Church through breakthrough missional growth must be found. For this study, a cross-disciplinary methodology was constructed from the substance of scripture, the unifying lens of biblical theology, and relevant social scientific models specifically concerned with the idea adoption process and the effectiveness of training practices. The research conducted reveals that yes, a focused missional message with a unifying emphasis on scripture can observably improve the missional orientation of believers, realigning them with God’s mission in their daily lives. The implications and applications of the results are significant, showing that all test group participants improved significantly in their missional knowledge and missional postures/attitudes after receiving the big picture message. There were also significant indications that participants were forming missional intentions/decisions that could inform future implementation of missional behaviors for the advancement of God’s Kingdom. This study provides ample evidence that the key to developing the missional orientation and awareness of churchgoers is a big picture approach to the biblical story, which traces the origins and trajectory of God’s mission from the days of Moses to the end of days.

Wesleyan revitalization of the church rooted in a theology of abundance

Author
Anthony Jason McCullough
Abstract
"How can Prattville First United Methodist Church employ a theology of abundance through engagement in the Wesleyan means of grace to overcome a religious identity of overwhelming scarcity? The author's project explores and focuses on this question through a re-envisioning of ministry structures within a local United Methodist congregation through contextual assessment, community collaboration and Biblical engagement. Through theological engagement with the subject of Biblical abundance, this project paper will articulate how a church can move from the power of a belief in scarcity to a practical holiness rooted in professing God's good news. Through small group conversations, experiential worship services, Bible studies, a sermon series, and intentional formation efforts, First United Methodist Church has grown in its orientation towards Biblical abundance, renewed religious identity and revitalization. The paper serves as a reflection on this transformation process with hopes to empower other local churches as they seek to discern and initiate revitalization in their congregations." -- Leaf [2].

A study on revival and building healthy spiritual soil of Korean Methodist Church of Queens with traditional soil

Author
Chul Yun Lee
Abstract
"The purpose of this paper was to find the possibility to transform the traditional Korean immigrant church in New York, USA into a church with healthy spiritual soil. As the new pastor of Korean Methodist Church of Queens, which had been on traditional soil for 33 years, the author deeply [was] concerned about what it takes to be a healthy church. So to accomplish this purpose, the author designed two programs : "Banaba training" and "Incarnational leader training." In conclusion, these projects showed positive results that, after implementation, helped transformation and maturity in the spiritual character and attitude of the leaders of Korean Methodist church of Queens." -- Supplied by the author.

Redeeming failure : how the stories of failed church plants point toward fruitfulness

Author
Matthew G. Johnson
Abstract
"New church starts in the United Methodist Church experience failure at a surprisingly high rate. The author spoke with six United Methodist Church planters to learn about the ways they experienced fruitfulness in ministry even as their projects were not deemed successful. Many of these stories have not been previously told and the author found it meaningful and important to share the stories of the important work that these planters accomplished. Using the information gathered from these stories, the author makes suggestions as to how church planting in the United Methodist Church might change to offer greater support and success to those people who are attempting to start new churches." -- Leaf [2].

A study on the indigenous church with Three Self Principle in Sri Lanka through SMC (Sri Lanka Mission Community)

Author
Woong Won Ha
Abstract
". . . . [T]he author explored . . . the indigenous church with Three Self Principle in Sri Lanka through SMC (Sri Lanka Mission Community) . . . . [T]he author observed a model of indigenous church from the early church and St. Paul to the church history of mission in part one. When he studied the model of indigenous church, he found three Self Principle such as Self-Supporting, Self-Governing, and Self-Propagating for the healthy indigenous church and several attempts in the mission history of the church. In part two, the author researched how to build the healthy indigenous church with three self-principle through 15 churches of SMC for 3 months, in a practical manner. For that, firstly, he provided a consultation with 15 pastors of SMC church and a reporting back to their churches. Secondly, he created a seminar that challenged 15 participants to evaluate their ministries with three self-principle and sought solutions by them. Thirdly, he provided two workshops for feedback, ministry and finance evaluation for the healthy indigenous church with three self-principle. Finally, he concluded this project to find the advantages and disadvantages through an analysis and evaluation." -- Leaf [2].

Re-committed : remembrance of baptism as a means of church growth and lifelong discipleship

Author
Levi Santure Gardner
Abstract
"The growth of churches is predicated upon the membership claiming the inheritance of baptism and living into the expectations of their initiation into Christ's holy church. The author analyzed the role of baptism in the life of a congregation where most do not remember or recall the moment of their baptism. In this evaluation, the author created tools for persons [in the United Methodist Church and other Christian traditions] to recommit to their baptism and the spiritual gifting that emerges from this practice. By so doing, the author intended to foster an environment of spiritual fruitfulness and congregational growth." -- Leaf [2].

Developing a workable strategy for membership recruitment within the Duahzon United Methodist Church, Kakata : Farmimgton River District, Liberia Annual Conference, the United Methodist Church

Author
Charles Winslow Fiske Jr.
Abstract
"Developing a workable strategy for membership recruitment within the Duahzon United Methodist Church has been a problem since it became recognized as a full-fledged church within the Kakata-Farmington River District of the Liberia Annual Conference. Prior to the inception of this project, the members of this young congregation were complacent with the idea of staying within the walls of their edifice and expect members to come looking for the church, instead of the church's reaching out into the communities to win souls for Christ. However, as a result of mobilizing the congregation through sermons, seminars and teachings carried out during Bible studies and Sunday school sections, coupled with its aggressive small group outreach initiatives, the congregation has developed a new module for membership recruitment, using small groups and this is significantly impacting not only its membership growth; it is also beginning to be a major factor for spiritual growth and revivalism as it prepares members of the church to become faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ." -- Leaf [2].

Hospitality, discipleship, and awe : a Pentecostal growth paradigm

Author
Gregory A. Carrol
Abstract
"The author of this project investigated whether a renewed focus on hospitality, intentional discipleship, and a revamped worship service could precipitate numerical and spiritual growth at the Queens Faith Temple Seventh-day Adventist Church in Queens, New York. He adapted and taught a hospitality and discipleship curriculum, preached a quarterly sermon series, and brought the congregation through a process of liturgical renovation. Document analysis, surveys, artifact elicitation, and the assistance of direct observers were the primary qualitative tools used in this intervention. Additionally, with the help of an app hosting company he designed and programmed a free church application to bolster the congregation's hospitality and discipleship practices. The results of the yearlong study signified an appreciable increase in average inhouse and online church attendance. There was also an overall increase in member perception of their own spiritual growth." -- Leaf [2].

Will Training Young Adult Christians to Evangelize Using the Five Thresholds Increase Their Confidence and Comfort in Sharing Their Faith?

Author
Peggy Ann Gibson
Abstract
With the declining of church attendance in generations younger than baby boomers, churches must shift their focus from maintenance to mission in order to avoid an existential threat. Reaching the younger generations will require a more personal approach than new programs and events. Overcoming skepticism and distrust are key factors in reaching the younger generations. The Five Thresholds Model will increase the confidence of young adults in the overall practice of evangelizing and, more specifically, in the practices of sharing their faith and inviting others to respond. The peer-to-peer evangelism training increased participants’ comfort level and confidence in sharing their faith with others.
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