Christian education--Curriculum

An Evaluation of the Community Foundations Curriculum for Enhancing Interpersonal Relationships Among Church-Based Small Group Participants

Author
Sten-Erik Armitage D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this applied research project is to evaluate the Community Foundations curriculum in the context of the local church as a potential means to address the problems that emerge in the church through the foundation of the unscriptural societal value of individualism and the subsequent epidemic of loneliness. The project seeks to determine the overall effectiveness of the curriculum in three key areas: grounding the community in understanding the significance of what it is to be “in Christ,” providing opportunities for small groups to cultivate a desire to both know and be known within the context of a trusted community, and finally to cultivate an environment wherein a burden of care is embraced and felt within said community.

The research centers on qualitative interviews with participants in the Beta launch of the Community Foundations curriculum. The Beta launch occurred between Spring 2018 and Fall 2019. Three hypotheses geared around the key areas addressed above are presented and evaluated through the content of the recorded interviews.

The research results indicate deeper and more sustainable relationships were cultivated through these small group experiences as well as a new appreciation for the value of shared story in the context of community.

Evaluating a Biblical Program for Family Education in Cleansing Stream Ministries

Author
Aijia Song D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
This thesis is divided into five chapters. The first chapter is the introduction. The introduction contains the purpose and questions of the thesis research, the design of questionnaire content and the analysis of the research results, and also the expected results, the research methods, and the basic concepts of the thesis. The second chapter is the biblical research and literature research, which includes the biblical foundation, theological foundation, philosophical foundation and literature review of the education in family. The third chapter is the process and methods of the research, which is the core content of this thesis. This chapter contains the reasons, questions, hypotheses, methods of the research, as well as the evaluation and assessment tools, the processes and detailed reports of the research. The fourth chapter is the results and analysis of the research. This chapter is also the focus of the thesis. Including three hypothetical results of the research and their corresponding detailed analysis, and the Bible-based Family Education Course in Cleansing Stream Ministry, which helps the education in family now existing. The fifth chapter is the conclusion and application part. This part, as a summary, presents the results of the research of the thesis and further research suggestions. At the end of the thesis is the attachment and bibliography.

Developing a Multiethnic Ministry Curriculum for the Technicolor Ministry School at First Baptist Church of Duluth, Duluth, Georgia

Author
Abioye O Tela
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to research the field of multiethnic ministry to develop an academic curriculum for the Technicolor Ministry School of the First Baptist Church of Duluth, Duluth, Georgia. The project director sets two primary ministry goals for this project. The first goal is to research the field of multiethnic ministry by studying a wide range of sources and attending a triennial national multiethnic conference to discover the prevailing characteristics and best practices. The second goal is to develop and write an academic curriculum for the Technicolor Ministry School of the First Baptist Church of Duluth. The project director will utilize the research model described in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Design Handbook to complete this project.

Measuring the Effectiveness of Equipping Families Using a Sermon-Based Curriculum at Fellowship Bible Church in Jacksonville, Texas

Author
Graham Hale D.Min.
Abstract
The aim of this project was to measure the effectiveness of using a sermon-based curriculum to combat biblical illiteracy and equip family shepherds for the work of home ministry. The two focus groups for this project at Fellowship Bible Church of Jacksonville, Texas, were the Sermon-Only Group and the Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group. The Sermon-Only Group listened to four sermons through the book of Zephaniah (selected because of its length, unfamiliarity, and gospel themes). The Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group listened to the sermons and also participated in a four-week, twenty-lesson study on Zephaniah in the home. The two groups were tested on their retention and application of what was taught from the book.

The thesis of this project was that parents and children in the Sermon and Sermon-Based Home-Discipleship Group would retain more of the Word of God and more faithfully apply the Word when compared to the Sermon-Only Group.

Chapter 1 addresses the problem of biblical illiteracy while also introducing the thesis. Chapter 2 makes an argument in favor of home discipleship both biblically and historically. Chapter 3 makes an argument biblically and practically for sermon-based instruction, introducing and explaining the effectiveness of using sermon-based curriculum in the home. Chapter 4 explains the preparation for and execution of the ministry project at FBC of Jacksonville. Chapter 5 includes a report on the findings from the project. In this chapter, the project director evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the project and what he would do differently in hindsight.

Equipping Selected Christian Leadership School Instructors of Westside Missionary Baptist Association, Marrero, Louisiana, with Transformational Teaching Skills

Author
Gertrude Taylor
Abstract
The purpose of the project was to meet the need of Christian education for Westide MIssionary Baptist Association, (WMBA) constituents and those in neighboring communities. The pressing need was to equip selected Christian education instructors of WMBA with transformational teaching skills. The project director began the process with research in the field of Christian education, specifically transformational teaching skills.

From the assortment of researched materials, an annotated bibliography was compiled from which an engaging curriculum designed to equip the selected instructors of WMBA with transformational teaching skills was developed. The project director facilitated implementation of the developed curriculum and thereby engaged and equipped the selected instructors with transformational teaching skills. The process extended an three-week period comprising three sessions each.

Encouraging Biblical Literacy: An assessment of the Biblical Literacy Task Force of the Anglican Diocese of Pittsburgh, 2008-2017.

Author
Richard C. Crocker
Abstract
Several surveys portray the current state of biblical literacy; accelerating decline an urgent concern. The biblical evidence in Old and New Testaments that God’s word is written, and should be heeded, is outlined. The doctrine of biblical inspiration is examined; biblical criticism necessitates changes in approach. Five historical instances of significant biblical engagement are described: catechetical movement; monasticism; Cranmer’s English Reformation; Charles Simeon’s impact; Sunday Schools. The Pittsburgh Biblical Literacy Task Force is examined, by review of materials, focus group, and clergy survey. Achievements are noted, and improvements suggested. Biblical literacy should become an intentional project of the church nationally.

EVALUATION OF A TEACHER TRAINING WORKSHOP FOR BIBLICAL WORLDVIEW EDUCATION AND TRANSFORMATION

Author
Rhonda Kaye Kamakawiwoole D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
Given the world’s plurality of worldviews, transformation to the biblical worldview—God’s understanding of reality—remains the paramount task of Christian parents and the church in cooperation with the Holy Spirit. Christian parents are to impress God's commands on their children so the next generation might come to know, love, and serve Him (Deut 6:6-7). Jesus charges the church to make disciples, baptize, and teach others to obey his commands (Matt 28:19-20), yet, spiritual formation is not the target it should be for most Christian families and the American church. The literature reveals a general lack in understanding of the biblical worldview in Christians across generations, and thus, believers lack confidence and motivation to share God’s worldview with others.
This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop designed to address transformation in the comprehension, commitment, and intended conduct of participants to train others to the biblical worldview. Statistical analysis revealed participants changed in understanding, confidence, and motivation toward engaging in further growth to the biblical worldview and training others to it. Anecdotal information gathered from comments on the post-training survey provided additional evidence of the above, as well as qualitative evidence demonstrating participants changed in their commitment to share God’s truth with others and planned for future change in this “commissioned” area for Christ.
The workshop effectively addressed the lack of intentionality about growing in and sharing the biblical worldview with others. The study showed adult Christians of all ages are more likely to engage in sharing the biblical worldview with others once they better understand the distinctives of the biblical worldview, gain confidence in their knowledge and abilities and are motivated to share it, and are equipped with models for training others to the biblical worldview.

Visio Divina: In Light of the USCCB Curriculum Framework

Author
Eileen B Maggiore D.Min.
Abstract
This thesis-project involved working with eleven high school seniors from two schools while applying visual ethnographic research. The research method for ministry is attributed to Evelyn and James Whitehead’s attending, asserting, and responding. The study addresses three Catholic traditions-- the USCCB's Doctrinal Elements of a Curriculum Framework for the Development of Catechetical Materials for Young People of High School Age, emerging disciples, and Lectio-Visio Divina -- juxtaposed to learning styles and postmodern American teens who attend two Chicagoland area Catholic high schools. The students were asked about their social media usage, teaching preferences and definition of a disciple. The interviewed students elicited a visual image, upon request, which represents discipleship and through the process of lamination described their image. The students spoke to their preferences of teaching styles along with how they would teach younger students. Students conversed about the time when they most felt like a disciple.
The interviewed students exhibited transformative learning after generating visual images from their personal mobile phones. The interviewees’ definition of a disciple became more elaborate as they progressed with the visual ethnographic discussion. The initial feedback to discipleship prompted an intellectual answer and through lamination their response became more personal. The students utilized generative learning to create a thick description of their previous knowledge about discipleship.
The students’ desire is to have their lessons taught with visuals and other supportive techniques, including time to assess new epistemologies. These findings suggest that the students are interested in a more embodied teaching experience which could promote teens into becoming emerging disciples. Transformative learning tools are found not to oppose, but rather complement the USCCB's Framework. It is suggested that the Gospel Visual Creation or to Pray the Lesson are teaching techniques which could assist in the formation of disciples among Catholic high school students.

ACTING JUSTLY: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RELIGION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR STUDENTS AT LAFAYETTE COLLEGE

Author
Alexandra M Hendrickson D.Min.
Abstract
Many students experience a disconnect between religious practice and social justice, even though social justice is a core value. Showing the connections between religion and social justice encourages these students to have a positive understanding of religion.

What effect will a six-week, small group on social justice in the Abrahamic traditions, have on their understanding and appreciation of religion as central to their ongoing formation?

The group of students I worked with experienced a strong connection between religion and social justice. After participating in the Religion and Social Justice small group, they hold positive, engaging, and holistic understandings of faith.

CAROL, KEVORKIAN, AND CHRISTINA YANG:
MORAL DEVELOPMENT THROUGH BIOETHICAL CASE STUDIES IN

Author
Derek Wilson D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
The thesis of this project argues that ethical education for too long has been a matter of principled approach built upon justice while neglecting moral development research of females through the works of Carol Gilligan. Bioethical education is best done in a balance of justice and relationships channeling both the works of Gilligan and Lawrence Kohlberg. By engaging with the people most affected by bioethics, those who are disabled, students are able to build empathy through case studies and thus make better informed ethical decisions. This project centers around a curriculum written for high school students studying bioethics. It lays out a groundwork for a theological basis for Christian education in bioethics as well as provides curriculum for the course.
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