Chaplains

AN AUTOETHNOGRAPHIC EXPLORATION OF MY CPE LEARNING PROCESS

Author
Anurag Mani D.Min.
Abstract
In this project I explore the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) learning process through the lenses of my human condition: my being an immigrant who was born and raised outside the United States of America and came to the country and to the Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) process in my adulthood. I use the research method of autoethnography to explore and give voice to my experience. As an immigrant, I observe that my experience of my journey to become a CPE Educator has been marked with unique challenges that seemed different to the experience of those who were born and raised in the U.S.A. My research question is: Can a careful analysis and interpretation of my own experience in the CPE education process help other immigrants seeking CPE certification to better understand their own complex and unique experience through this difficult, challenging, and exciting process?

That They May Have Life: The Congregation's Opportunity to Strengthen Resiliency and Foster Wholeness Amid Trauma in the Lives of Volunteer First Responders

Author
Jason Cashing D.Min.
Abstract
With every emergency, first responders are exposed to a degree of traumatic stress. This Secondary Traumatic Stress can sap the life and purpose from first responders, and the accumulation of unaddressed STS can lead to burnout, unhealthy coping mechanisms, and even suicide. The congregation, though practices of Sabbath and Lament, can offer pathways to help mitigate STS and strengthen resilience. Looking at the invitation to Abundant Life in John 10, the Church’s calling and the world’s need intersect, providing a framework and a language to help first responders and congregations alike realize the fullness of Life offered to all.

Discovering an Evangelical Theology of Chaplancy

Author
Michael William Elmore
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to discover an evangelical theology of chaplaincy that will guide chaplains in their practice of ministry in a pluralistic religious environment while maintaining integrity with their evangelical faith. A total of 180 surveys were completed by evangelical chaplains (working chaplains, professors, CPE supervisors, and denominational directors). Out of 180 participants, 136 completed all aspects of the survey. The survey focused on practical theology or what chaplains believe and do. Therefore, the results accurately portray the practice of evangelical chaplains working in the field of chaplaincy. Chaplains acknolwedgeded their frustrations and celebrated their joys.

Researching and Designing a Mentoring Handbook for Professional Chaplains at Baptist Community Ministries in New Orleans

Author
T June Wilder
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to develop a mentoring handbook to assist professional chaplains employed with Baptist Community Ministries, New Orleans, Louisiana, to mentor chaplains through the professional board-certification process. The project is based upon the premise of chaplains seeking professional status in chaplaincy as a full-time ministry. The project director began her project by researching material in the field of mentoring in order to develop a procedure for professional chaplains to follow when called upon to mentor chaplains through national board certification. The project director compiled the mentoring procedure in the form of a handbook incorporating the board-certificatuin process initiated by the Association of Professional Chaplains, one of several nationally recognized organizations that promotes professional chaplaincy.

The impact of death anxiety

Author
Llewellyn M Drumbor
Abstract
Death anxiety and the fear of death are often intertwined in the human psyche, presenting the potential for a broad array of destructive forces unless courage is found to address and manage both death anxiety and the fear of death. The first section of this project addresses death. It explores such authorities as psychiatrist Irvin Yalom who wrote regarding the momentous importance of death and its role in shaping one's life perspective. The focus of quoted sources and of the author is that death needs to be confronted as a life-empowering change; especially the lives and death competence of chaplains and clergy. Only through such change will chaplains and clergy be unfettered to teach, model, and assist others, in confronting the destructive forces of death anxiety and fear of death. Exploring death anxiety and fear of death, defines death anxiety while discussing the relationship between death anxiety and fear. Fear of death has a focus, a primary concern. Most scholars conclude that three primary concerns comprise fear of death: Thoughts of a punishing afterlife; dread of annihilation; and the physical pain that may be felt while dying. The project explains how an integration of knowledge, skills, and competences is critical to preparing the chaplain/clergy for effective ministry. The professional caregiver will need to come to terms with her/his own mortality before building the trust that transcends the fear and death anxiety inherent with end-of-life patients.

Establishing the role of nurse chaplain through A Listening Heart Ministries

Author
David A Currie
Abstract
This thesis project describes the concept and development of the role of nurse chaplain by the author, through A Listening Heart Ministries. The role allows her to bring to her chaplaincy her many years of experience working as a registered nurse. She is seeking to establish the new role in a way that affirms and incorporates all of her nursing education, knowledge and experience as the background for this new chaplain role. The two hypotheses she addresses in this thesis are that there is a great need for more chaplain services in various settings, including nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and homeless shelters; and that the role of chaplain is enriched in many ways when the chaplain is also a nurse.

Keys to resilient practice in contemporary chaplaincy

Author
Tyler L Kruger
Abstract
The author researched professional chaplains to learn how they remain resilient while working in a physically, emotionally, and spiritually depleting environment. He studied resilence literature, conducted personal interviews with chaplains, and collected data/responses from an online survey. He learned that incorporating intentional self-care practices that nurture the body, mind, and spirit may reduce the risk of burnout and compassion fatigue, while lowering the impact of secondary traumatic stress. Also important to the chaplain's well-being is a support network of family, friends, co-workers, supervisors, and professional counselors; plus meaningful work that provides fulfillment for the individual.

Equipping a selected group of Georgia Baptist volunteers in basic chaplaincy

Author
Ricky D Thrasher
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to equip a selected group of Georgia Baptist volunteers in basic chaplaincy skills. This equipping program model included a series of teaching sessions, videos, and exercises to enable participants to minister in chosen contexts as chaplains. The anticipated result was to be an effective process and the curricula to better enable the volunteers to serve with some basic skills as chaplains throughout Georgia in numerous areas. A prospective outcome was that volunteers of different ages, genders, and vocations would enter a chaplaincy ministry with the ability to serve effectively.

Beliefs and practices in professional chaplaincy

Author
Joseph Steven Spidell
Abstract
In this paper the author offers an analysis of the contemporary situation of professional chaplaincy and of its roots in Clinical Pastoral Education. The results of a survey are presented regarding some chaplains' beliefs regarding spirituality and medicine, their practices, and how these are related to CPE training. The author reviews complementary and alternative medicine to suggest resources for expanding chaplaincy perspectives and presents a chart of complementary spiritual practices. The author offers a theological perspective on pastoral care drawing on process-oriented theology and argues that chaplains bring a "healing intentionality" into their patient care.
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