Chaplains

Impact of Spiritual Counseling for African American Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

Author
R. Lorraine Brown D.Min.
Abstract
The author researched how African Americans, age 18-28, who received care for sickle cell disease (SCD), were impacted by intentional sharing of clinic-based spiritual counseling. This spiritual intervention addressed the often unspoken concerns of this population. Understanding spirituality, while managing the many facets of SCD, is vital for holistic health. Participants found themselves at critical junctures in their spiritual development - seeking, exploring, even questioning - how spirituality plays a role in their overall well-being. The project collected both qualitative and quantitative data through a chaplain interventionist. The chaplain met 1:1 with participants to share strategies for increasing everyday coping and self-efficacy. The participants found spiritual care to be necessary and helpful as they navigated their daily lives and sickle cell disease. The author came to realize to truly be effective, an in-depth longitudinal study is needed for true impact.

Impact of Spiritual Counseling for African American Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

Author
R. Lorraine Brown M.Div.
Abstract
The author researched how African Americans, age 18-28, who received care for sickle cell disease were impacted by intentional sharing of clinic-based spiritual counseling. This spiritual intervention addressed the often-unspoken concerns of this population. Understanding spirituality, while managing the many facets of SCD, is vital for holistic health. Participants found themselves at critical junctures in their spiritual development -- seeking, exploring, even questioning -- how spirituality plays a role in their overall well-being. The project collected both qualitative and quantitative data through a chaplain interventionist. The chaplain met 1:1 with participants to share strategies for increasing everyday coping and self-efficacy. The participants found spiritual care to be necessary and helpful as they navigated their daily lives and sickle cell disease. The author came to realize to truly be effective, an in-depth longitudinal study is needed for true impact.

An exploration of the use of moral injury by senior chaplains in their role as advisors to commanders at the operational and strategic level

Author
Shaun Donald Yaskiw
Abstract
Senior military leaders have a special responsibility for the well-being of those under their command - including their spiritual well-being. Moral injury has the potential to significantly corrode the well-being of military personnel, those who lead them, and the institution. Military chaplains have a unique advisory role to play in helping military leaders care for the spiritual well-being of their personnel. Senior military chaplains have the additional opportunity to help senior military leaders shape the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) so as to seek to prevent moral injury, reduce its incidence, and mitigate its effects when it occurs.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Religious support in special operations

Author
Kelly L. O'Lear
Abstract
The author, a six-year veteran of the Special Operations community, researched the religious support needs of the United States Special Operations community and their dependents. This was accomplished by collecting and analyzing data within the author's unit as well as data made available by the United States Special Operations Command. The analysis provided recommendations for Religious support Teams in identifying the religious and spiritual needs of the Special Operations community in addition to how Religious Support Teams can adapt to the Special Operations culture.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Caring for warriors : ministry to remotely piloted aircrew, moral injury and just war

Author
Joel D. Kornegay
Abstract
The objective of this project was to create training materials for Air Force chaplains serving the remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) community focusing on caring for individuals dealing with moral injury. The author interviewed pilots and sensor operators to assess their moral, ethical and religious perspectives on war and killing. Additionally, the author interviewed psychologists and an ethicist with experience in the RPA community. These interviews, along with extensive study of scholarly works, enabled the author to develop a training curriculum for chaplains as well as a briefing for RPA aircrew to effectively care for warriors wrestling with moral injury.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Loving God and neighbors with our minds : a theology of religious neighbors equips chaplains for ministry

Author
J. Nathan Kline
Abstract
U.S. Army Chaplains’ requirements to care for soldiers of all religious traditions assume a theology that informs this ministry, a theology of religious neighbors. As most seminaries do not train their students to do this and the Chaplaincy does not teach theology, chaplains are likely to either compromise their own religious commitments or soldiers’ free exercise of religion. The author analyzed contributions of theologians and questionnaires and assignments of chaplain students, which informed the construction of a diagnostic instrument to guide chaplains in framing or refining a theology to care for and work with those of other religious traditions.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Prayer-magic : a theology and practice of using prayer in crisis

Author
Philip David King
Abstract
Prayer used by military chaplains for persons in crisis can be misunderstood as magic. A survey of chaplains was done regarding their experiences, and from the survey a five sermon series on prayer was produced and presented. A group of volunteers then shared a 121 day private prayer pilgrimage experience to develop deeper prayer practice and explore spiritual formation.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

"Been there, done that" : tangible, leading-edge ministry by and for military retirees and veterans

Author
Dwayne W. Keener
Abstract
The objective of this project was to develop a military retiree ministry plan which empowers retirees for ministry to military members and their families. The author led two 16 member, retiree focus groups leading to the creation of a relevant ministry action plan, inclusive of retirees. The author also interviewed 6 senior and installation chaplains who all agreed that military retirees can be a value added resource for ministry. The analysis suggests that many military retirees and chaplains agree that a tangible ministry plan, which empowers retirees, and meets the needs of our active duty military, is relevant and necessary.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

The theological, personal and pastoral identity of the military chaplain

Author
Anthony J. Hunley
Abstract
Cultivating and sustaining one’s theological, personal, and pastoral identity while serving in the religiously and culturally diverse environment of the military is critical to the success of the mission and the chaplain. Utilizing John Wesley’s Class Meeting model, the author constituted a provisional Chaplain Covenant Group as one tool to support chaplains in their identity efforts. This Project Paper shares the foundations and story of that group; along with recommendations for implementation of this successful initiative as other military chaplains seek to defend themselves against spiritual warfare, bolster their identity, and live out their calling to serve God and country.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

An army chaplain's guide to help single servicemembers navigate the dating process

Author
Patrick Hester
Abstract
This project presents training to help single servicemembers safely navigate the dating process. The training, unlike the Army’s Single Soldiers Strong Bonds program, welcomes a single servicemembers’ romantic partner. This training incorporates key elements of the Strong Bonds' training, but in less time and with additional resources. The author prepared a questionnaire addressing key aspects of dating for the members of the 3rd Squadron 61st Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The feedback was used to develop training that focuses on helping single servicemembers acquire the knowledge needed to assess if a potential romantic partner’s qualities are conducive for a healthy romantic relationship.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]
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