African American clergy

Gospel Hospitality: A Foundational Pillar for Unifying Clergy and Laity as a Collaborative Community

Author
Pamela Rivera
Abstract
The ongoing categorizing of African Methodist Episcopal churches by membership size and budget has promoted an unconscious practice of succession leadership. This injurious practice ends up impeding the participation of lower-tier churches and hinders the building of authentic Christ-like relationships. This project intends to introduce gospel hospitality as a spiritual value that invites all clergy and lay leaders to the table of relationships as equal advocates. The researcher used constructive narrative theology to collect and interpret the data that was generated through the project. The data concluded, ‘Gospel Hospitality is a Foundational Pillar for Unifying Clergy and Laity as A Collaborative Community.’

The first step of the transformation journey : an in depth look at the role of the pastor as he leads an African-American congregation through change

Author
Howard C Earle
Abstract
The African-American church has been one of the many storied institutions that has played significant a role in shaping American culture. However, the African-American church and American culture exist in a reciprocal relationship; changes in American culture have impacted the African-American church in numerous ways. In order to maintain its relevance, the African-American church must undergo transformation. Working from the hypothesis, "The pastor as theologian can lead an historic, urban congregation through a journey of transformation from being a congregation of commuters lacking significant presence in its surrounding community to one that is more responsive to the needs of the community and maintains a felt, empowering presence," l initiated a five-step discovery process. This process becomes the first step in the transformation journey. The process consists of: a series of sermons, ethnographic interviews with a sample of the congregation, a tour of the surrounding community, a panel discussion with community leaders, and a network mapping exercise.

An Exploration of African American Pastors Use of Spiritual Disciplines to Combat Spiritual Burnout

Author
Herman L. Baxter Sr. D.Min.
Abstract
Leading in ministry can be a challenging job. The struggle to fulfill a divine calling while being human leaves no rest for the weary. African American pastor is no exception. These spiritual leaders often experience spiritual dryness – stress, and burnout - due to excessive demands that may lead to physical, emotional, and spiritual exhaustion. Days run into nights and, as they say in Broadway, “the show must go on” for most pastors every week. Many weary pastors combat spiritual dryness – fatigue, burnout, depression, and more – longing for more “peace that surpasses all understanding.” It is no wonder that some pastors do not remain in the ministry after five years. Trying to minister in this state is not ideal, yet many pastors remain resilient.

Throughout the history of the Christian church, practicing spiritual disciplines have been a means to spiritual renewal. However, across the United States, these practices to combat spiritual dryness are done a little differently in predominately African American led churches.

This study will gather qualitative research through in-depth interviews to discover how seven selected African American senior pastors combat spiritual dryness. The interview questions noted circumstances for times of spiritual dryness, the pastors’ experiences through spiritual dryness, and the process to combat spiritual dryness. This understanding helped these African American pastors overcome spiritual dryness. Interview responses will produce common themes and confirm three significant elements to combating spiritual dryness. First, the participants will identify different spiritual discipline practices for other times of spiritual dryness. Next, they will concur that upholding a robust biblical discipline is needed to prepare for times of spiritual burnout. Finally, participants will verify that a healthy dependence on God is required to maintain spiritual wellness. This project concludes with the participants’ suggestions for how newly assigned Christian leaders can most effectively combat spiritual dryness.

Clergy couple care

Author
Lisa C. Banks-Williams
Abstract
"This research will explore factors that impact a pastor's ability and willingness to engage in self-care strategies. It is my observation, through research and conversation, that African American pastors are less likely to engage in self-care strategies, seek mental health counseling, or engage in activities sponsored by evangelical leadership initiatives. In an effort to reduce the risk of attrition from ministry, Clergy Couple Care is a culturally sensitive, multi-couple retreat model, offered to equip new and seasoned clergy couples with education regarding the: 1) impact of trauma in ministry, 2) implementation of self-care strategies, 3) importance of healthy effective communication skills, and 4) inclusion of couple relationship enhancement interventions." -- Leaf [2].

Outsiders on the Inside: Racial Fatigue and Resilience among Black Pastors in the Presbyterian Church in America

Author
William E. Boyce
Abstract
This project assesses the state of racial fatigue among Black pastors in the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), triangulating phenomenology, Scripture, and theology to evaluate the PCA’s faithfulness to its stated aims regarding doctrine and race. An analysis of the denomination’s central tenets shows a theological mandate to welcome minority pastors. But the lived experiences of many Black pastors tells a different story. Though initially welcomed, these pastors sense that they are still “outsiders,” leading them to develop strategies to help them thrive and develop resilience in the face of a challenging racial ministry context.
his project assesses the state of racial fatigue among Black pastors in the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), triangulating phenomenology, Scripture, and theology to evaluate the PCA’s faithfulness to its stated aims regarding doctrine and race.

The Impact of Preaching on Church Growth: Black Churches in The North Georgia Conference of The United Methodist Church

Author
Yvette Denise Massey D.Min.
Abstract
This project addresses the question of whether good preaching can cause congregational growth. The location of the work was two Black churches in the North Georgia Conference of The United Methodist Church and included preaching a variety of sermons, followed by congregational research on the influence of the sermons on church growth. Through this project, the thesis on which this work was based, that church growth was a direct result of good preaching, changed to recognize that while preaching alone does not cause church growth, it is one of many significant factors in the decision to join a church. The project reveals that a comprehensive church system that includes elements such as preaching, outreach, nurture, Christian education, evangelism, and worship, is necessary to impact congregational growth.

Developing a mentoring strategy for African-American church planters for the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Author
Steven Beckham
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to offer a strategy that was used by church planters in the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which were primarily led by African-Americans. The strategy helped the church planter with some best practices that worked for others. The strategy model found in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Handbook was the model used to facilitate the project.

A wide range of resources were used to gain a fundamental understanding of mentoring strategy programs across a broad spectrum of denominations. The project director utilized this information to build a mentoring strategy for the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge
(BAGBR) and the wide array of African-American church plants that it serves. The strategy served as a training tool to guide new African-American church plants as they evolved into healthy churches.

Preaching for Prophetic Witness Inspiring a Black Middle-Class Congregation to Engage its Marginalized Community

Author
Richard D Shaw
Abstract
Following the Civil Rights movements of the sixties, many Black preachers turned their away from prophetic preaching, and despite the critical need, chose not to preach sermons addressing social injustice during Sunday morning worship services. As a result, the Black church, in many cases, has become irrelevant on social issues that affect the communities where they are located. This thesis project addresses the requirements for preaching prophetically during Sunday morning worship to a Black, middle-class congregation, and aims to show that preaching for prophetic witness can be used as a means of inspiring a congregation that identifies itself as Black middle-class to reach out fully to its marginalized community.

Standing in the intersection equipping, resourcing, & mentoring young clergywoman of color

Author
Theresa S Thames
Abstract
This project develops an intervention that responds to the ways in which the intersectionality of age, gender, and race presents unique challenges for young clergywomen of color. The study utilizes autoethnography, literature reviews, and both qualitative and quantitative research to identify five core competencies that are necessary for young clergywomen of color to thrive: self-awareness, strategic thinking, leadership, balance, and cultivating relationships. Old Testament scripture and womanist theology provide a framework for the personal and professional development curriculum that can be utilized by seminaries, denominations, and other sources of theological education in the training of young clergywomen of color.

No Title Specified

Author
A. Williams Mondonico
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to research the field of African-American pastoral leadership in multiethnic churches in order to develop a leadership workshop for pastoral interns in The Pursuit Church Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee. The project director research a wide range of sources to gain knowledge of the best practices used by African-American pastors who lead multiethnic churches. The project director used the information to develop a worksohp that will be used at The Pursuit Church Memphis, as well as other churches, churches planting networks, North American Mission Board (NAMB), and denominations that which to plant or revitalize multiethnic churches. The project director utilizes the research model described in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Design Handbook to complete this project.
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