African American churches

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Homophobia in some African American Churches in the DMV

Author
Mason K Nurney
Abstract
The problem investigated was homophobia in some African American Churches (AAC) in the Washington, DC metropolitan area (DMV). The researcher used three data streams -- scriptural, contemporary and case studies -- to determine possible causes for homophobia in the AAC in the DMV. The data revealed that leaders acting on what they have been taught frame their ministry paradigms in ministering to LGBT people. These influences are deeply embedded into the culture of the AAC and the psyche of the AA pastor. From the data collected the researcher created a rubric scale of church leaders, as well as fourteen recommendations the AA pastor can use a reference guide to minister to LGBT members in their congregations.

Tech-evangelism: the development and implementation of a social media strategy an African-American church

Author
Michael G Christie
Abstract
In this project report addresses, "How technology and, in particular, social media can be used to promote the work of an African-American Baptist Church." The main goals are 1) strategy creation, 2) team development, 3) online capacity and content assessment, 4) test the social media effectiveness both internally and externally outreach, and finally 6) raise the congregation's visibility and use of social media and technology. The project concludes that in light of the shifting technological and cultural landscape the church can benefit from emerging technology. The project successful used technology to increase outreach to the community and to its congregation.

African-American churches that effectively engage men in the life of the church: perspectives on pathways to success

Author
Nate Birle
Abstract
the focus of this dissertation was to discover what Missionary Baptist Churches in the midlands of South Carolina are doing to effectively engage men in the life of the local church. The research begins with the question; To what do African-American churches that effectively engage men in the life of the church attribute their success? The research included twelve churches from five different counties. There were a total of 22 different interviews with pastors and brotherhood presidents who are part of the Baptist E & M Convetion of South Carolina.

A model for development of a program to train those called to prophetic ministry

Author
Jacquelyn M Ragin
Abstract
This project is a program created for the McCreary Center for African American Religious Studies in Cleveland, Ohio to train people called to a ministry of prophecy. I used 5 point Likert scale questionnaires to glean information from 29 participants: 10 pastors and 19 ministers, to determine what ministers and pastors believed about training for prophets. Pastors and ministers strongly agreed that education and training for people with the gift of prophecy are important. Pastors agreed that they would likely recommend training and ministers agreed that they would attend a program for training. From the results of the data a model was created that consists of workshops, conferences, and a diploma program.

A project to discover why African American churches are not socially active in Gastonia, North Carolina

Author
Rodney B Freeman
Abstract
The project discovered why the African American Baptist churches are not socially active in Gastonia, NC. The 127 participants were given a 5-point Likert scale with 12 questions to discover why, and a section to evaluate the study. The data revealed that the participants disagreed with the suggestions that were offered on the 5-point Likert scale as to why the Black churches were not involved in social activism. Although they disagreed with the suggestions on the 5-point Likert scale, they failed to offer any ample ideas.

A New Testament model of hospitality for the African American Church

Author
Charmaine L Green
Abstract
The 21st century has ushered many changes into the African American church (attire, personal expressions, family structures) which reflect differences between individuals entering the church and those reared in the church and have challenged the status quo of many more traditional members thus resulting in the waning of hospitality practices in many African American churches and prompting the need for a resurgence of hospitality to again make the church welcoming of all. This project uses the program planning model to develop a spiritual formation and discipleship program intended to develop disciples who exhibit hospitality to all individuals entering the church.

African American churches and green ministry: African American church and community empowered through resolution of climate change and environmental racism

Author
Janelle J Thompson
Abstract
The central theme of this project is grounded in the assumption that prophetic preaching forms a Christian body with a prophetic consciousness and identity. In order for preaching to be profoundly transformational in the shaping of a faith community's identity, the prophetic preacher must recover an eschatological awareness and urgency. The goal of this project is to explore the matter at hand from the rich African American preaching tradition which has been a conduit of life to a community encircled by life-negating forces.

Starting new United Methodist churches reaching African Americans in the new millennium

Author
Candace Montel Lewis
Abstract
The United Methodist Church can effectively start new churches reaching African Americans in the new millennium. The author looks historically at the United Methodist Church's journey in starting new churches to reach African Americans and the strategies implemented during each era. She discusses the need for a theology of church planting and explains how Wesleyan, Trinitarian, and Incarnational Theology can inform church planting. She presents insights from the Lifeway African American Church planting research project which surveyed 290 African American planters. Lastly she shares practical strategies for starting new churches reaching African Americans.

From Sunday School to freedom school: a new paradigm for religious education

Author
Heber M Brown
Abstract
The Sunday School programs of many African American churches are struggling because they use curricula that employ a program of spiritual formation that does not substantively honor cultural connection, ethnic identity, or issues of social relevance to black youth. Furthermore, many black churches and denominations have opted to use a Sunday School outline with roots in white Protestant theology and are employing a pedagogy that negates the genius of black youth. After researching currently available Sunday school curricula, the author created an African-centered church school curriculum and Freedom School program based on the Freedom Schools of the Civil Rights era.
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