African American churches

Building Community for the Renewal of Mission in Chicago's Catholic Parishes: The Wisdom of the Black Catholic Experience for Renew My Church

Author
Matthew Sean O'Donnell D.Min.
Abstract
Renew My Church is described as an innovative pastoral initiative in the Archdiocese of Chicago that identifies the three guiding imperatives of making disciples, building communities, and inspiring witness as essential to the renewal of pastoral life and ministry in the Archdiocese. Every parish in the Archdiocese will participate in this initiative. This thesis-project will critically engage the imperative to build community by looking at St. Katharine Drexel parish in Chicago, Illinois. This thesis-project will demonstrate how learning from the Black Catholic experience of building, strengthening, and sustaining community can contribute a spirituality and theological foundation for Renew My Church that is rooted in a communal worldview.

A Project to Discover the Need for a Prison Ministry at New Mount Zion Baptist Church in Cleveland, OH

Author
Vernell Lumbus-Young
Abstract
A Project to Discover the Need for a Prison Ministry at New Mount Zion Baptist Church in Cleveland, OH :
The purpose of this project was to discover the need for a prison ministry at New Mount Zion Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. In order to determine the need for a prison ministry, a five-point Likert scale questionnaire survey was designed along with one to two open ended questions. The results of the survey revealed that there was a great interest among the congregants for a prison ministry. In the final results of my questionnaire survey and open ended questions, almost all respondents revealed that there is a need for a prison ministry. I concluded that there was a 95% interest in the need for a prison ministry at New Mount Zion Baptist Church.

Discovering How African-American Male Soldiers' Self-Esteem is Diminished and Restored n the Army

Author
Everett Lee Caldwell
Abstract
Discovering How African-American Male Soldiers' Self-Esteem is Diminished and Restored n the Army:
The purpose of this project was to discover how African American male chaplains have recognized the dynamics that have lowered self-esteem of African American male soldiers and to identify ways that have been used to restore their self-esteem in the U.S. Army. A 5-point Likert scale survey was taken by eight African American male chaplains within the 807th brigade. It was discovered: 1) African American male soldiers' self-esteem is diminished when denied promotions; 2) African American male soldiers were encouraged by seeing black officers; 3) African American male chaplains gave words of empowerment to help soldiers overcome racial injustices.

Attitudes Toward African American Female Clergy in the C.M.E. Church

Author
Sheree L Winn
Abstract
Attitudes Toward African American Female Clergy in the C.M.E. Church by Sheree L. Winn (Ashland Theological Seminary)
This project was to discover how the attitudes of the members of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church toward African American female clergy affect their positions in leading first churches (major charges or large congregations) and serving as Presiding Elders and Bishops. There were thirty-three (330 participants who completed a 5-point Likert scale survey in January 2018 at a pastor's conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The results of revealed: some attitudes prevent it, disbelief that sexism exists and congregants resist African American female clergy in leadership positions.

Why African-American Generation X'ers Do Not Attend African-American Churches

Author
Lillian Robinson
Abstract
Why African-American Generation X'ers Do Not Attend African-American Churches
This dissertation responds to the question, what are the reasons that African-American Gen X'ers do not attend the African-American Church? Surveys were completed by twenty community volunteers. They survey consisted of twenty Likert-Scale questions, one open - ended statement, and three survey evaluation questions.
The results revealed 60% of the participants felt the church service time did not meet their schedules. The reasons included busy lifestyles, finances, and a desire to preserve personal time. Hypocrisy in the church was selected by 45% of the participants. Ninety-four percent of the participants felt the survey allowed them to express their honest options.

A Discovery of Healing Prayer in Treatment for Physical Ailments at Mount Calvary Baptist Church

Author
James G Vittek
Abstract
A Discovery of Healing Prayer in Treatment for Physical Ailments at Mount Calvary Baptist Church:
The purpose of this project was to discover the degree to which a group of adult members of Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Bedford, Ohio, integrate healing prayer into treatment for physical ailments. The design of the project included the administration of a quantitative and qualitative survey-questionnaire to be completed by the participants of the study. Demographic questions addressed gender, age, and race. The results of the project revealed that the participants mostly agreed that they used healing prayer to treat physical pain in themselves and others.

A Discovery of Cooperative Missional Outreach in the Greater Cleveland Area

Author
Yvonne Carter
Abstract
A Discovery of Cooperative Missional Outreach in the Greater Cleveland Area:
The purpose of this project was to discover the extent to which Christian leaders in the Cleveland Baptist Association are aligned around the need for cooperative missional outreach. The discovery process utilized survey questions designed to give input to the nine project goals. The survey results revealed a significant degree of alignment.
The most prominent finding was in response to Goal #7, which was to discover how CBA church leaders understand missional outreach in relation to Christian discipleship. Survey responses indicate that there is alignment among the respondents in their understanding of missional outreach as a function of Christian discipleship.

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Homophobia in some African American Churches in the DMV

Author
Mason K Nurney
Abstract
The problem investigated was homophobia in some African American Churches (AAC) in the Washington, DC metropolitan area (DMV). The researcher used three data streams -- scriptural, contemporary and case studies -- to determine possible causes for homophobia in the AAC in the DMV. The data revealed that leaders acting on what they have been taught frame their ministry paradigms in ministering to LGBT people. These influences are deeply embedded into the culture of the AAC and the psyche of the AA pastor. From the data collected the researcher created a rubric scale of church leaders, as well as fourteen recommendations the AA pastor can use a reference guide to minister to LGBT members in their congregations.

Tech-evangelism: the development and implementation of a social media strategy an African-American church

Author
Michael G Christie
Abstract
In this project report addresses, "How technology and, in particular, social media can be used to promote the work of an African-American Baptist Church." The main goals are 1) strategy creation, 2) team development, 3) online capacity and content assessment, 4) test the social media effectiveness both internally and externally outreach, and finally 6) raise the congregation's visibility and use of social media and technology. The project concludes that in light of the shifting technological and cultural landscape the church can benefit from emerging technology. The project successful used technology to increase outreach to the community and to its congregation.
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