Adventist Churches

Dare to change : adaptive leadership internship experiences by seminary interns in field education

Author
Dorothee Edith Tripodi
Abstract
"By engaging in congregational analysis using Heifetz and Linsky's leadership characteristics, UPSem (Richmond) M.Div. seminary interns of the summer 2019 intensive and fall 2019 part-time academic year sessions defined internship experiences as either technical, technical-adaptive, or adaptive. The instructor, using ethnographic methodology combined with Heifetz's reflection process of observation, interpretation, and intervention, explored the interns' narrative findings concerning their ability to identify leadership challenges. The conventional wisdom that students would be limited in their ability to use Heifetz and Linsky's leadership characteristic due to lack of ministerial experience proofed unfounded. The outcome of this ethnographic reflection invites further exploration concerning a pastoral intern's leadership abilities in light of on-going vocational discernment, vocational identity, and authority in complex systems subject to denominational and cultural change." -- Leaf [2].

Transformational discipleship that leads to church growth

Author
Dewaine L. Frazer
Abstract
"Ministry on Purpose (M.O.P.) is the name of a new leadership team created to bring vitality to the mission of the First Seventh-day Adventist Church in Montclair, New Jersey. This initiative led to transformational discipleship and church growth. Ministry on Purpose worked on four significant areas of the church: vision and mission, worship, community engagement, and the training of members. Through a careful six-week study on the life of Christ, one-on-one interviews, surveys, innovation, and most importantly prayer, the congregation has been changed. The church has experienced spiritual and numerical growth and is excited about where God will lead next." -- Leaf [2].

Hospitality, discipleship, and awe : a Pentecostal growth paradigm

Author
Gregory A. Carrol
Abstract
"The author of this project investigated whether a renewed focus on hospitality, intentional discipleship, and a revamped worship service could precipitate numerical and spiritual growth at the Queens Faith Temple Seventh-day Adventist Church in Queens, New York. He adapted and taught a hospitality and discipleship curriculum, preached a quarterly sermon series, and brought the congregation through a process of liturgical renovation. Document analysis, surveys, artifact elicitation, and the assistance of direct observers were the primary qualitative tools used in this intervention. Additionally, with the help of an app hosting company he designed and programmed a free church application to bolster the congregation's hospitality and discipleship practices. The results of the yearlong study signified an appreciable increase in average inhouse and online church attendance. There was also an overall increase in member perception of their own spiritual growth." -- Leaf [2].

The commencement of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in the British Isles and the lessons learnt for establishing new churches today

Author
Richard Daly
Abstract
The Seventh-day Adventist church in the British Isles has seen steady numerical growth since its inception. However, interest from the indigenous and non-religious community, has been in decline. In response, a thorough examination was made of the methods used by the Adventist pioneers in starting new congregations to see what lessons can be revived for today's church. The Project Director undertook to produce a documentary based on the findings together with a workshop, to help prepare pastors and members to develop missional churches within their community.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]
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