PRE-FIELD ORIENTATION AND TRAINING OF FGM MISSIONARIES

Full Title
PRE-FIELD ORIENTATION AND TRAINING OF FGM MISSIONARIES
Author
David Selvey D.Min.
Abstract
A lack of cross-cultural training in the secular and religious sectors has contributed to attrition of valuable workers who are engaged in cross-cultural contexts. Until the twentieth century, the impact of cross-cultural factors on the effectiveness and efficiency of international workers was not a serious consideration in the English-speaking world.

Mission agency training remained somewhat static until end of the twentieth century when several studies reported on missionary attrition factors and multi-national entities began to evaluate their losses due to cross-cultural issues. ReMAP and ReMAPII collated much data on missionary attrition, identifying several factors as preventable. Several of these factors pointed back to potential weaknesses in preparation and screening missionary candidates for cross-cultural work.

In response to this problem, this study presents the need for missionary Pre-Field Orientation and Training (PFOT) and lays a foundation that includes biblical, theological, historical, and practical reasons. The research includes ancient and current literature as well as case studies of the Pre-Field Orientation and Training programs of three major evangelical mission agencies.

The study produced a PFOT plan for Faith Global Missions that utilizes current technology and educational methods. The work includes the process of plan development, evaluative input from missionary trainers and training experts, PFOT subjects, and pedagogy that may be useful to Faith Global Missions and other missionary training organizations.
Degree Granting Institution
Country
United States
Degree Granted
Doctor of Ministry
Major
Mission and Evangelism
Type of Work
D.Min. Project
Advisor
Craig Ott Ph.D.
David Siever Ph.D.
William Donahue Ph.D.
Language
English
Date
2016
Copyright Statement
Copyright is held by author. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.