DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERING DEGREES OF SPECIFICITY IN SERMON APPLICATION

Full Title
DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERING DEGREES OF SPECIFICITY IN SERMON APPLICATION
Author
Roger Chen D.Min.
Abstract
"So what?" This is the question every believer should ask at the end of any sermon because the Word of God should be applied to the Christian's life. If the sermon's goal is to effect change in the lives of the congregation, then the preacher has the obligation to not only explain the text but explain what the text means in a practical outworking of daily living. The balance that must be struck is the role of the preacher combined with the role of the Holy Spirit to guide the listener in how to apply the sermon.
This project shows the importance of application in preaching God's Word and seeks to determine the extent to which a pastor should provide this application in preaching. With many different examples from Scripture combined with varying views of application from extra-biblical sources available to the preacher, navigating the nuances of homiletics can be overwhelming and confusing. This project endeavors to provide some clarity to the matter as it pertains to application.
This project involves the preaching of nine sermons after which volunteers complete two surveys for each sermon which ask the volunteers what they believed to be the application in the sermon as well as how they plan to apply that application; the second survey asks if and how the sermon was applied. The surveys, including the interaction with the volunteers, are handled anonymously through the aid of an administrator.
This project shows the importance of the partnership between the human preacher's provision of application in the sermon with the Holy Spirit working in the believer to apply the Word. Additionally, the support for varying methods of application across the preacher's body of work is explained.
Degree Granting Institution
Country
United States
Degree Granted
Doctor of Ministry
Major
Preaching
Type of Work
D.Min. Project
Advisor
David Larson Ph.D.
Martin Crain D.Min.
William Donahue Ph.D.
Language
English
Date
2017
Copyright Statement
Copyright is held by author. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.