Social networks

The networked preacher: using new media in the new evangelization

Author
Alex J Zenthoefer
Abstract
This project maintains that the tools of Social Networking Sites can be a valuable tool for the work of evangelization. Chapter one explores the origins of the New Evangelization and offers a review of its significance for preachers today. Chapter two addresses the sociological effects of Social Networking Sites. Chapter three highlights recent efforts by Church leaders to take advantage of the tools of new media in evangelization. Chapter four focuses the reader's attention on how preachers can use the tools available through Social Networking Sites. Chapter five presents the results of a survey carried out by the author.

Member care of Salvation Army officers and their families

Author
W Thomas McWilliams
Abstract
The author of this thesis researched the organizational member care of Salvation Army officers and their families. The research described the inherent hazards of working within this ministry. A quantitative survey was sent to every officer serving in the Southern Territory to understand their felt needs. The research showed that children, emotional problems, and administrative expectations were at the top felt needs. The results also demonstrated that officers were hesitant to reach out to the administration because of fear of negative consequences. An organizational member care model was constructed as a recommendation to the administration.

Confirming through prayer governing principles that will guide the next decade of the cell church network in Brazil

Author
William A Beckham
Abstract
God directs network movements through governing principles that Christians discover through prayer. Using a series of personal, small group and large group prayer venues, leaders of the Cell Church Network in Brazil affirmed existing principles that emerged over the past fifteen years and identified new principles for the next decade. Representatives of the network adopted six governing principles at the 2012 annual meeting: every house a church; every member a minister; every church a training center; every church a sending base; every church a multiplying agent of movements; every church a transformation and connection agent.

The integration of discipleship and digital technology

Author
Phillip A Sallee
Abstract
Despite the exponential growth of digital technology and social media, little is known about how these new tools can be used to advance the goal of discipleship. The image that some Christian leaders have of digital technology and social media is that it is unnecessary, is a waste of time, and is fraught with potential dangers. Similar to most emerging technologies, dangers to exist; however, an opportunity to expand exponentially the influence of a disciple maker through digital technology and social media also exists. This dissertation will document a digital=discipleship experiment that was conducted in the writer's church for one month. It will describe the theological foundation for discipleship. Further, it will test the results of the digital-discipleship experiment with spiritual inventories, which were conducted before and after the experiment. The results demonstrated that digital technology is an asset to discipleship. Research data collected indicates two significant findings: a gap exists between a disciple's motivation and involvement, and digital technology increases spiritual involvement.

Social networking and the church: evaluating the electronic media program of Wildwood Community Church

Author
R Mark Robinson
Abstract
The thesis of this dissertation is that there is a positive relationship between participation in the electronic media program of Wildwood Community Church (including reading blogs, listening to podcasts, participating in the church Facebook group, and following the church on Twitter) and sermon retention and application, experience of group life, and involvement in serving. This dissertation shows how one church in Norman, Oklahoma intentionally developed a strategy to leverage electronic media resources in an attempt to further their chief discipleship goals related to helping people worship, connect, and serve. The hypotheses anticipated that participation in the electronic media program would reveal a positive relationship in sermon retention and application, experience of group life, and involvement in service. To determine the validity of these hypotheses, a pre-test/post-test was designed to evaluate the change in sixty demographically diverse participants after a one-month period in the electronic media program in July 2010. After the results of the survey were examined, the hypothesis concerning a positive relationship between participation in the electronic media program and sermon retention and application was confirmed. However, a statistical analysis of the data did not confirm the two hypotheses that predicted a positive relationship between participation in the electronic media program and an improved experience of group life and involvement in service.

Living into the United Methodist way: finding our way back into connection

Author
Linda M Louderback
Abstract
In her role as Director of Connectional Ministries the author found that the Connectional Ministries Council had become disconnected. Many good and varied ministries were taking place, but none were connected with each other, and most were not based upon the vision of the annual conference. The author needed to find a way to network leaders, ministries and local churches. The bishop and extended cabinet determined that the Leadership3 Incubator process was to be implemented as a spiritual and leadership development tool. The author was invited to participate in an incubator with the bishop and his appointive cabinet. Part of that process was to create a ministry action plan appropriate for the author's work. She decided to develop a cohesive Connectional Ministries Council by leading an incubator group with the executive team, the connectional ministries conference staff, the conference lay leader, a district superintendent and the bishop's administrative assistant. This project paper rehearses the connecting lessons from the past, especially from the early days of John Wesley, and offers ways to adapt them for current times. She shares the process that the incubator went through, the lessons learned, and a model to teach other conference groups how to develop relationships and begin to network together in a time of deliberate growth and planning.
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