Law (Theology)

Meditating on the Law Imagining God's Reign through the lens of Torah in Pslam 1

Author
Peter A Bynum
Abstract
Based on an exegetical study of three key terms in Psalm 1 (happy, law, and meditate) and a guided qualitative experiment using the covenant law, this project explores the path of imaginative reflection on torah that the psalmist urges every faithful believer to walk. The research concludes that the seeking of happiness through delight and meditation upon "the law of the Lord" remains a significant and fruitful spiritual discipline for Christians despite negative perceptions of societal and biblical law.

The place of the Ten Commandments in the Church of God pulpit

Author
Matthew A Taylor
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which Church of God preachers use the Ten Commandments to address their socio-political and ecclesiastical contexts. What may appear to some as a crisis of ambiguity about the nature and place of the Ten Commandments in the public and religious spheres in America could be regarded as an opportunity for clarity on the part of preachers. The study addresses the need for Church of God preachers to engage in cultural dialogue through a fresh preaching of the Ten Commandments. The literature review surveys scholarly works regarding the context and meaning of the Decalogue in the Old and New Testaments, the meaning of the Commandments in light of a corrosive postmodern value system, and views of scholars and preachers regarding how to preach the Ten Commandments. The study included interviews with six Church of God Movement preachers, with the goal of learning about their experences related to the place of the Decalogue in the pulpit. The study asked how the preachers handled the Decalogue, exposited the Commandments, and trained congregations in discipleship.

The hope of a new obedience in Paul

Author
Spencer R Stadler
Abstract
Paul rejected as now longer valid the traditional Jewish approach to law-observance in favor of discerning God's will through the leading of the Spirit. The author discusses the Deuteronomistic hope in a new obedience common to the OT, Paul and first-century Judaism; passages in Paul's letters that point to the rejection of continued law-observance as understood by Paul's contemporaries; possible reasons for that rejection; and Paul's use of the OT, the teaching of Jesus, and the Jerusalem church as reflective of Paul's new approach. A Spirit-led ethic will continue to use Scripture and must safeguard from sinking into moral relativism.

Perfect freedom: the New Testament believer and the Old Testament law

Author
J Render Caines
Abstract
The thesis of this project is that it is essential for the New Testament believer to have a working knowledge of the Old Testament law. The law reveals to us not only our sin and need of a savior, but also the pattern of holy living that God would have us emulate. An examination of various scriptures, the Westminster Confession of Faith and the recent writings of various scholars makes clear the necessity of this task. The law is a paradigm which we are privileged to apply to current circumstances.
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