Niebuhr, H Richard,--1894-1962

Greatest asset and biggest challenge: understanding the reasons why young families are or are not involved in the life of a congregation and what to do about it

Author
Frank T Rupnik
Abstract
Young families represent growth and the future of our church, yet they are often the most difficult to reach. The author of this project researched the various reasons why these young families are or are not involved in the life of a congregation. By interviewing them directly, compiling the information, and looking for patterns, he then offers advice for church leaders. Using H. Richard Niebuhr's Christ and Culture as a guide, he created his own paradigm "Culture and Christ" by inversing the patterns and starting with Culture. The project is both thorough and extremely informative in addressing the needs of this demographic.

Towards an understanding of the church/world tension: practical studies in Niebuhr's paradigms

Author
John S Lindberg
Abstract
The relationship between the church and the world has been analyzed and examined since the church began. Utilizing the paradigms suggested by H Richard Niebuhr in Christ and Culture, this project in ministry developed a diagnostic instrument for use by pastors and congregations in helping them to understand their attitudes toward the church/world tension. The context for this project was a group of United Methodist pastors attending Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky.

(Ad-)ministering in the body of Christ

Author
William C Bartlett
Abstract
H Richard Niebuhr described the vocation of church leaders as being "the perplexed profession". Church leaders have never been able to package neatly the redemptive work of Jesus Christ, their responsive servanthood, the omniscience of God, and the ecclesiastical hierarchy necessary for a local church to present to the world the gospel of Jesus Christ in the fashion it deserves. This paper identifies the problem; examines organizational models of local churches; presents one model which is biblical, faithful, and organizationally effective; and provides a practical, easy-to-use manual which administers a local parish with the emphasis on ministry.

Value change in selected college students

Author
James B Peden
Abstract
The project studies the sociological and theological aspects of values in marriage and families, and compares the ideas of H Richard Niebuhr, Joseph Fletcher, and Kurt Baier. A comparison is also made between Lawrence Kohlberg, Sidney Simon, and Milton Rokeach concerning value changes. The study found that course content (exclusive of teacher involvement or pedagogical method used) did not have a significant influence on value change of students in a one semester course taught at Champlain College, Burlington, Vermont.

The revelatory experience as the basis for spiritual growth

Author
Shane Douglas O'Neil
Abstract
This dissertation-project, grounded in the revelation theology of H Richard Niebuhr and the spiritual theology of Henri J M Nouwen, develops a learning design which incorporates prayer, the Bible, and the experiences of spiritual masters as resources for revelatory experience. Such revelatory experience, the author holds, is the basis for true spirituality; ie, the integration of religious experience and prophetic action.

"Thou shall have no other gods before me": a Jungian approach to understanding the first commandment

Author
William Edgar Kopp
Abstract
The author presents the thesis that the "gods" implied in the first commandment are to be found in the archetypal images of the collective unconscious and adds two corollaries to his hypothesis, first that Jung's psychological theories offer significant insight into our polytheistic nature, and second, that a methodology based upon Jungian psychology could assist persons in their personal struggle with a polytheistic psychology and facilitate movement toward a "radical monotheism" (cf H Richard Niebuhr). The hypothesis and accompanying corollaries were studied using an already existing Jungian study curriculum produced by the Centerpoint Foundation, called Centerpoint I. The curriculum was enhanced by the addition of Ira Progoff's journaling methodology, the personal journals of the participants being the major evaluative data sources for the research itself. The data was generally in support of the hypothesis and its corollaries, namely, that our polytheistic tendencies are rooted in the human psyche and that heightened personal consciousness equates with a movement from polytheism toward monotheism.

The church we are, the church we are called to be

Author
Robert Manning Price
Abstract
This project/thesis revolves around an adult study on the church which was done at Cecilton United Methodist Parish, Maryland. The thesis/text is divided into two parts which address the sociological and theological dimensions of the church, respectively. Part one deals with the context of the church in America, the development of denominationalism, and the church and culture in terms of the church as a product of culture. Part two deals with the church in the New Testament, the views of Luther, Calvin and Wesley on the church, Avery Dulles' models of the church, and considers the views of Karl Barth and H Richard Niebuhr. The thesis/text suggests that our understanding of the church is best expressed in dialectical terms. God is the one who calls us, loves us and reaches out to us first, but there is also a human response. The "true church" is invisible, but it is also visible.
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