Candler School of Theology

A theomusicological study of style and taste in two United Methodist churches in northcentral Pennsylvania

Author
Jeffrey Alan Seeley
Abstract
This project explores the musical life and faith expression of two United Methodist congregations--Colonial Park (Harrisburg, Pa) and Wellsboro (Pa)--in order to articulate and celebrate the musical heritages of these congregations and to study alternative musical styles as potential avenues of faith formation and expression. Members of these churches exhibit diverse musical preferences and appear to welcome diversity. They find hymn singing essential to worship. Musical style issues provoke occasional moments of crisis in the choirs.

Becoming critical: learning to reflect theologically in a school of ministry

Author
Robert G Hunter
Abstract
This project proposes a learning environment based on principles of a shared praxis relationship operating in an action-reflection model of education for pastors who are teachers of lay persons. The project employs various educational methodologies to process issues of pastoral care in relation to situational analysis, normative evaluation, and practical responses. Pastors and students demonstrate significant progress in critical theological reflection that results in more authentic responses of care. Pastors can teach and lay persons can learn theological reflection on their practice of ministry.

Using total quality management to strengthen the ministry of the Sunday school

Author
Robert Clayton Childers
Abstract
This project proposes that critical use of Total Quality Management (TQM) principles can strengthen the ministry of Sunday schools. TQM's emphasis on "worker involvement" helps empower lay participants; emphasis on "continual improvement" helps clarify a Sunday school's mission and vision; emphasis on "listening" leads to better understanding of context and current reality. Critical evaluation of TQM is necessary and important. TQM's emphasis on "customer satisfaction" risks undermining the gospel message in favor of accommodation to local beliefs and cultures. TQM's philosophy must be supplemented by an appropriate respect for tradition.

The borderland is our parish: toward a model of ministry to stranded migrants on the United States-Mexico border. . .

Author
Eduardo Rivera
Abstract
This project seeks to develop an effective ministry to migrants along the US-Mexico border by fostering partnerships between Methodists on both sides of the border that can lead to mutual understanding, critical reflection, and a better knowledge of immigration issues. The project employs pedagogic principles based on Thomas H Groome's "shared-praxis" and action-reflection exercises to improve awareness and encourage specific actions for cooperative ministry.

Pastoral care of interracially married couples: Korean-American context

Author
John ByeongSoo Kim
Abstract
This project proposes to instruct pastoral counselors in mediation techniques that can lead to reconciliation in troubled marriages of Korean wives and American husbands. Due to cultural and linguistic barriers, variances in child-rearing philosophies, and the negative Han (wounded feelings) of a Korean wife, such marriages face greater challenges than monocultural marriages. The project suggests that Five-Angle Pastoral Counseling--involving an American husband, a Korean wife, an American pastor, a Korean pastor, and God--can facilitate happy marriages of persons from these races and cultures.

The challenge of providing a therapeutic environment for the Black Adventist clergy

Author
Trevor Hendricks Fraser
Abstract
This project explores attitudes of African American Adventist clergy toward the therapeutic environment, seeking to determine factors that contribute to these attitudes and elements that might influence their reception of the psychosocial approach to mental health for themselves or their families. The project circulates an attitudinal questionnaire on the Likert model to 85 pastors serving Seventh-day Adventist churches in the southeastern US, finding that these African Americans are reticent about the therapeutic process because of perceived stigma. This finding is borne out in current literature suggesting that African Americans as a group feel stigmatized by the mental health process and therefore resist it. Clergy resistance surely influences lay attitudes, just as clergy who use mental health services can provide a positive role model for church members.

Approaching prayer: a model for Christian prayer formation in the local congregation

Author
Thomas William Eliiott
Abstract
This project proposes that a disciplined context for prayer formation in local congregations will produce spiritual growth. Employing lectio divina, spiritual friendship, and practicums, the project produces eight study guides for sessions constructed on the prayer lives of biblical and historical spiritual figures, and introduces these materials in a small group at First United Methodist Church of Dacula, Georgia. Surprising responses encourage further exploration into communal, disciplined prayer in the Wesleyan spirit and provide ground for critical assessment of the project for use in other congregations.

Developing a model of pastoral care of bereaved African-American families in a Missionary Baptist Church

Author
Joseph Augusta Bryant
Abstract
This project proposes a model for pastoral care of bereaved African American families through an extended study of 27 deaths in a Missionary Baptist congregation, concentrating on the stages of grief. Based on interviews and questionnaires distributed among bereaved families, the project constructs a model that establishes networks among families, funeral directors, support groups, and social service agencies; empowers families and support ministries to meet needs of those who experience grief; and promotes healthy pastor/parish relationships as pastors lead bereaved families and communities through stages of grief. The project finds that grief is a process with differing stages of recovery; people experience and react to grief in different ways; and the pastor is a pivotal person in this process because in the African American community the pastor is considered to have biblical and theological knowledge of grief.

A workshop for developing a Chinese pastoral theological method

Author
Xiaoling Zhu
Abstract
During a workshop at Nanjing Union Theological Seminary, Nanjing, China, this project introduces American pastoral care methods to Chinese seminarians, identified traditional methods of Chinese pastoral care, assessed the values of these additional insights for Chinese pastoral ministry, and suggested implications for pastoral theological education in China. The workshop discovers similarities in human nature, life experiences, feelings, and needs between Western and Eastern traditions. Different traditional theological methods have one goal: to understand living human documents and meet human pastoral needs. The project illuminates the possibility and necessity of developing a Chinese pastoral theological method.

The Lock Hymn Tune Collection: hymns as a theology of worship

Author
Barbara N Salter
Abstract
This project demonstrates connections between an act of ministry as proclamation/herald and an act of ministry as teaching/performance. The Lock Hymn Tune Collection demonstrates these acts through performance of select hymns. A lecture/concert presented the hymn collection as a model for linking performance and proclamation. Hymns selected illustrate the growth of the collection, the variety of musical styles performed by the congregation, and the theological, social, and musical basis on which these hymns gradually evolved. Through an evaluation of the concert by both audience and performers, the project demonstrates imaginative use of historical texts and tunes in today's church. A commentary presented during the performance reflects on the history, purpose, and social context of the collection.
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