Bible--Study--Methodology

IDENTIFYING COMMON CHALLENGES FACING LEADERS IN THE SECOND GENERATION OF LARGE CHURCHES TO FORTIFY HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH DOWNTOWN (MINNEAPOLIS)

Author
Cor M Chmieleski D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to identify common challenges facing leaders in the
second generation of large churches. This was the reality of Hope Community Church
Downtown (HCC DT) in Minneapolis, MN at the time of this paper’s formation. Specific areas
of challenge which have been explored include growth from small to large and transitions in
leadership between generation and senior leaders. The fortification of the church depends on
building an accurate list of common challenges that can be later addressed by church staff and
leadership.

The process utilized to accomplish that purpose included robust biblical and literature
research followed by interviews with seven pastors serving in churches similar to HCC DT. The
initial research led to a preliminary list of challenges which were then utilized in interviews to
determine their relative validity within the lived experiences of pastors. Analysis of the research
and field work revealed five significant findings churches must address for the sake of long-term
endurance: (1) Answer the question, “Who are we today?”, (2) Address unavoidable realities, (3)
Foster the following, (4) Protect against these, and (5) Achieve success in pastoral succession.
Each of these is explained and illustrated with real-life examples from within local churches.

Upon completion of this project, a list of common challenges was presented to the elders
and staff of HCC DT. It was then their responsibility to read, discuss, pray, and respond to the
challenges addressed herein.

HERMENEUTICAL MEDITATION AT FOUNTAIN OF LIFE: FOSTERING A HABITUAL INTERACTION WITH SCRIPTURE AMONG MILLENNIALS

Author
Matthew Bassett Ford D.Min.
Abstract
Thesis:
A certain kind of habitual interaction the author calls “hermeneutical mediation” is both biblically warranted and effective for cultivating growth in life transformation for the Christian. The author asserts that properly interpreting the Scriptures as well as properly interpreting oneself in light of the Scriptures is paramount for life change. The study especially focused on cultivating this habit among Millennials.

Method:
After submitting a questionnaire to the congregation at large and facilitating pre-seminar interviews with a volunteer group of Millennials from the congregation, the author implemented a six-session seminar designed to cultivate “hermeneutical meditation” among the Millennials who volunteered. Post-seminar interviews were then facilitated in order to discern the results of the effort.

Conclusion:
The seminar could be improved, but after the implementation and interviews, it is clear that fostering hermeneutical meditation through a seminar format was effective for helping Christians (especially in this case, Millennials) grow in life transformation through their habitual interaction with Scripture.

Witness to the Presence of God Moments in the Action and Voice of Children

Author
Jane Janine Pekar D.Min.
Abstract

This portfolio begins with a reflection of my personal journey in spiritual formation. In response to the contemporary shift in society’s affirmation of the rights an voice of children as world citizens and my experiences as a teacher, parent and ordained minister, I created a model of ministry for families with young children combining components of Young Child & Worship and Messy Church. Using Action Research, I introduced principles of the Reggio-Inspired Approach to enhance the children’s personalization of the experience. The observations of the children’s creative responses and intuitive initiatives were recorded and shared in four Documentations.

THE DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN EIGHT-WEEK, SMALL GROUP-BASED BIBLE STUDY COURSE FOR MARRIED COUPLES SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO STRENGTHEN THE MARRIAGE RELATIONSHIP

Author
David Alan Shaffer D.Min.
Abstract
This project seeks to answer the research question, “Does an eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants?” Today’s most effective marriage programs focus on important themes relevant to marriage and include transparency, a biblical foundation, and gentle accountability. Still, the question follows, “What comes next to further strengthen marriages?” This project answers this question with a process-based Bible study that, because of its design, strengthens the marriage relationship with improved communication, conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction (the three measures of this project). This methodology includes weekly individual study, couple discussion, and small group interaction.
Through the use of pre- and post-course surveys, the couples who participated in a study of Galatians provided ample quantitative research that yielded group, couples, and gender statistics. The couples’ data was measured by Positive Couple Agreement (PCA), which identifies couples’ responses as a relational strength when they choose the same response or are within one choice of each other (4 [agree] or 5 [strongly agree] on a positively worded statement, 2 [disagree] or 1 [strongly disagree] on a negatively worded statement).
The researcher designed Galatians: True Freedom – A Small Group Study for Couples to implement the new methodology to be evaluated. The quantitative data based on the pre- and post-course surveys provided the means to prove whether the three measures strengthened the marriages of the participating couples. The data supports the veracity of all three hypotheses (improved communication, improved conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction), showing strong growth in each measure, most notably with communication. These results led to the research conclusion: Yes, the methodology used in this eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples developed for this applied research project did strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants.

Transforming Migrants to Missionaries: Reaching and Training Inner-City Transient Apartment Dwellers for Christ

Author
Wilbert C Baker D.Min.
Abstract
Chapter 1 of this dissertation project argues that using a disciple-making method that has relationship-building as a key ingredient in the process is more effective in reaching African-American inner-city apartment residents than door-to-door evangelism using tracts. This study is a comparison of how evangelism is typically done among Baptist churches (and most Evangelical churches) with how it should be done to fulfill the Great Commission.
Chapter 2 argues that both God and man have roles in evangelism, and that God’s sovereignty does not exempt man from his responsibility and accountability to God in receiving and sharing the gift of salvation.
Chapter 3 examines segments of evangelism and missions from a historical perspective and records insights for contemporary ministry from a historical and theological perspective.
Chapter 4 Describes the new people Group: African-American inner-city transient apartment residents. It describes their culture, world view, and their self-image.
Chapter 5 conducts research in the selected environment with selected indigenous individuals to collect and analyze data to discover the most effective means to reach inner-city African-American apartment residents with the Gospel.
Chapter 6 argues the conclusion, based upon the findings of the research accumulated from the two trained teams and the six selected families, that evangelism which engages in disciple-making after leading persons to Christ, is twice as effective as evangelism models that lead persons to Christ but do not include any follow-up and training. The disciple-making model is effective in this context and can be duplicated in the twenty-first century. This study does not compare evangelism without disciple making with evangelism with disciple making. This study compares what the majority of Baptist churches are doing to fulfill the Great Commission with what they should be doing to fulfill the Great Commission with particular attention given to the African-American inner-city transient apartment dwellers.


Determining the benefits of discipleship training using the Bible as primary discussion material in various sized groups of 3-4, 10-14, and 20+

Author
Daniel G Kachikis
Abstract
Using a one-year Bible as the sole discipleship material and discussion as the primary method of guidance, the author surveyed three research study groups of different sizes. The findings indicate that using the one-year Bible helped the participants grow in their love for Christ and love for the Word. This study also saw participants grow in their confidence to make disciples and grow in their willingness to make disciple-making their lifestyle in following Christ. Regarding the optimal group size, the author found that groups of five to eight seemed to naturally become the best platform for discipleship.

An inductive Bible study training program for Christian adults at the EF Church of Clear Lake, Iowa utilizing Leadership Resources International TNT Dig-and-Discover hermeneutical principles

Author
Daniel W Jordan
Abstract
The Dig-and-Discover manual developed by Leadership Resources International was used to train eight lay adult members of the Evangelical Free Church of Clear Lake, Iowa in an inductive, grammatical hermeneutic for Bible study. Worksheets with assigned passages and questions were distributed and returned for pre-training assignments, in-training homework, and concluding with a post-training project. The pre- and post-training worksheets were compared to determine the trainee's understanding and application of the principles. The training manual gave sound basis for Bible study, and proved useful for literate adults to learn and practice the principles.

A design for continuing education in biblical holiness preaching

Author
Duane C Brush
Abstract
The problem facing preachers in the Church of the Nazarene of how to clearly and convincingly proclaim the biblical call to holy living is explored, A survey was conducted to examine the challenges faced in preaching and teaching biblical holiness. Major problem areas identified include the language used to describe biblical holiness and how to apply the subject to contemporary audiences. To address these problems a model continuing education course was designed and presented. Both pre- and postcourse evaluations of participants were conducted. Recommendations include a program of training and continuing education for Nazarene preachers in methods of biblical exegesis and application related to the effective proclamation of biblical holiness.

Developing a course to teach congregants to interpret Scripture

Author
Gene A Cassady
Abstract
This project was birthed out of the need to provide lay persons with a solid foundation for interpreting Scripture. Many approach the Bible as a collection of verses with little to no connection and thereby formulate misunderstandings of God's work and world. This project surveys the history of interpretation to gain perspective and learn from the past. Then, it examines scholarly resources and those intended for lay persons to discover the topics which need to be addressed. A number of basic principles of Bible study are discussed in order to form a foundational course to help lay people learn to interpret Scripture.
Subscribe to Bible--Study--Methodology