Bible--Old Testament--Study

Indigenous African Demonic Deliverance and its Transference into Pentecostalism with Subsequent Refining: Ghana and its Diaspora as a Case Study

Author
Duane Sterling Sims M.A.
Abstract

This paper examines how the traditional Ghanaian worldview has been contextualized by grass-roots Christians in Ghana, and further by Ghanaian Pentecostals, and how this has been exported, adapted, and refined from Ghana across national and continental lines to its diaspora. I hope to address some key questions regarding Ghanaian deliverance practices (at home and abroad) and integrate my findings into ministry, whether to Africans or anyone. Some of these questions include: “What drives Ghanaians to seek deliverance? How have they, historically, sought to deal with the spirit realm? How do they currently seek to deal with it? What are some of the differences between a traditional Ghanaian understanding and that of a Ghanaian Pentecostal view?”

Even To Our Graying Years: Faithfulness and Renewal In An Aging Church

Author
Jeffrey Colarossi D.Min.
Abstract
My Project in Ministry has begun a conversation that will, with God’s help, work toward the renewal of an aging congregation, Westwood First Presbyterian Church, offering a pastoral care plan to calm members’ anxiety and fear over the challenges threatening the church, and an action plan necessary for the church to be able to live faithfully, into a hopeful future, trusting in God. Engaging Biblical texts, Reformed Polity, the Spirituality of Aging, and key theologies––Practical, Vocation, Discipleship and Life-Long Learning––the project offers the church a clear vision for the future and a tangible plan to organize, energize and engage the congregation. The implementation of the project, involving the Worship and Christian Education ministries of the church, as well as the qualitative social research methodologies of self-report questionnaires and guided interviews, enabled the project to clearly communicate that vision and plan, and convey the sense of validation needed to establish participants trust, so crucial to the success of the project. The enthusiastic response, participation and support of the church throughout the process––particularly its leadership––offers a sense of confidence that the conversation will continue well into the future.

Responsible freedom how pastors make application from redemptive historical Old Testament narrative sermons

Author
Steven J Van Noort
Abstract
Many pastors find application difficult, especially in redemptive historical Old Testament narrative sermons where there are a variety of practical and hermeneutical issues to consider. Therefore, this study was designed to explore how pastors make application in such sermons. The study used a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with four pastors from the Reformed/Presbyterian tradition who were very dedicated to preaching Christ and making good application. Making application from Old Testament narratives is more of an art than science. Despite the ambiguity, "responsible freedom" enables pastors to avoid moralistic sermons and giving sermons that do not have application.

Teaching the big picture of the Old Testament in one 90 minute seminar

Author
Donald P Marshall
Abstract
This thesis-project addresses the issue of developing in the minds of Christians a mental overview of the Old Testament. After demonstrating the need for such a mental overview, it presents a proposed manual for teaching pastors and laypeople how to grasp for themselves and effectively communicate to others the message of the Old Testament to today's listeners.

Teaching material on biblical narrative genre based on 2 Samuel 11:1-12:15 with special focus on David's adultery and Nathan's prophecy

Author
Chee Way Chen
Abstract
This dissertation explored the narrator's use of David's sin to teach that effective leadership requires a turning away from evil and obedience to God's commandments. The methodology to discover the narrator's intention involved analyzing the different elements in the biblical narrative genre; that is, the setting, character, plots, rhetoric, narrative time and point of view. It also included practical sessions of a Bible study based on observing the elements in the text.

Advancement for the study of Biblical Hebrew and the study of ancient Israel for the local church

Author
Stephanie Allen
Abstract
The project developed and designed a resource for the local church within a Christian education curriculum. The resource has five sections intended to be taught as individual sections in a classroom setting or to be used by an individual as a tutorial. Included in the resource as one of the sections is the Torah translated from Hebrew to English with a side-by-side comparison of both languages in manuscript style. The resource stood to fill a gap in the curriculum of the local church and to provide a way for pastors and Christian educators to grow deeper in their relationship with Christ through the Word of God.

Presenting the big picture of the Old Testament from the pulpit

Author
Robert A Pohler
Abstract
Christians today need a broader comprehension of the Old Testament. Many have a fragmented knowledge of the Old Testament, that is, they know the stories of the Old Testament but don't see how these stories fit together. The author researched preaching processes which will help preachers develop the big picture of the Old Testament through a series of sermons and used these processes in a series of 30 sermons. Results were evaluated and recommendations specified.

The lion has roared: a seminar on preaching Old Testament poetry

Author
Tony Chester
Abstract
The thesis of the work is that preachers should appreciate the form-content bond in poetry; that literary and rhetorical conventions create an "effect" and embody meaning. Bibliographic research and interviews with professors led to the seminar and centered on several homiletically significant characteristics of Old Testament poetry.

Recovery of a Biblical worldview in a postmodern context informed by the Hebrew Scriptures as enhanced by graced interaction between gentile and Messianic Jewish Faith communities

Author
Nicholas A Marziani
Abstract
This study investigates focused and intentional interaction between Gentile and Messianic Jewish believers on the ability of Gentile Christians to appropriate and apply Hebrew biblical canon. A cohort of Episcopalians and members of a Messianic Jewish synagogue in the Fort Worth-Dallas area who associated in worship and fellowship are examined. The study considers theological issues concerning Jewish identity in the Church and their place in the economy of salvation. The thesis and conclusion are that observable and repeatable improvements in Old Testament comprehension, appreciation and application occur in Gentile Christians as a result of graced interaction with Jewish believers.
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