Bible--New Testament--Homiletic use

Indigenous African Demonic Deliverance and its Transference into Pentecostalism with Subsequent Refining: Ghana and its Diaspora as a Case Study

Author
Duane Sterling Sims M.A.
Abstract

This paper examines how the traditional Ghanaian worldview has been contextualized by grass-roots Christians in Ghana, and further by Ghanaian Pentecostals, and how this has been exported, adapted, and refined from Ghana across national and continental lines to its diaspora. I hope to address some key questions regarding Ghanaian deliverance practices (at home and abroad) and integrate my findings into ministry, whether to Africans or anyone. Some of these questions include: “What drives Ghanaians to seek deliverance? How have they, historically, sought to deal with the spirit realm? How do they currently seek to deal with it? What are some of the differences between a traditional Ghanaian understanding and that of a Ghanaian Pentecostal view?”

Language for Effective Preaching: Practical Guide for Fidei Donum Priests in the Belleville Diocese

Author
Urban Chidi Osuji D.Min.
Abstract
ABSTRACT

LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE PREACHING
PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR FIDEI DONUM PRIESTS
IN THE BELLEVILLE DIOCESE

Urban Osuji, Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis, Missouri.

Culture is an inherited conception that has to do with what a person learns from the parents, others, and the society about what it means to be a human being. As a child grows in the society, the child learns the culture’s general assumptions about family relations, relations between men and women, attitude towards life and death. A child learns these assumptions from parents and caregivers. There are other cultural expressions including table manners and the distribution of chores. Of all these inherited conceptions, language is the most symbolic of them all.
Language as an essential part of preaching is the subject of this thesis. The hypothesis is that Fidei Donum Priests can be effective Preachers by attending to the linguistic idioms, imageries, phrases, and sentence construction of the local congregation. The language of preaching is the concrete language of everyday life. Preaching language is the language that the children hear and understand and when they do not understand, their mothers offer a simpler understanding of the language with stories and imageries. Stories and imageries create and leave impressions on the emotional life of the people. When Priests use stories, imageries, and metaphors in preaching, listeners identify God’s presence in their midst. And that is why concrete imageries are the best tools for preaching.
But the use of concrete language in preaching does not come easy to the missionaries. Therefore, Fidei Donum Priests must immerse themselves by taking time to go to the people, live among them, share their lives and learn their language, including imageries, metaphors, and stories that have significant value for them.

LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE PREACHING PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR FIDEI DONUM PRIESTS IN THE BELLEVILLE DIOCESE

Author
Urban Chidi Osuji D.Min.
Abstract
ABSTRACT

LANGUAGE FOR EFFECTIVE PREACHING
PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR FIDEI DONUM PRIESTS
IN BELLEVILLE DIOCESE

Urban Osuji, C.M., B.D., M.P.S., D.Min. Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis, Missouri, 2020.

Culture as an inherited conception that has to do with what a person learns from the parents and the society about what it means to be a human being. These include the totality of the norms, ways of acting, and understanding that people learn from cradle which helps them know how to fit into the world. As a child grows in the society the child learns the culture’s general assumptions about family relations, relations between men and women, attitude towards life and death. Of all these inherited conceptions, language is the most symbolic of them all.
The hypothesis is that Fidei Donum Priests can be effective preachers by attending to the linguistic idioms, imageries, phrases, and sentence construction of the local congregation. The language of preaching is the concrete language of everyday life. Preaching language is the language that the children hear and understand and when they do not understand, as their mothers offer a simpler understanding of the language with stories and imageries. Stories and imageries create and leave impressions on the emotional life of the people. When preachers use stories, imageries, and metaphors in preaching, listeners identify God’s presence in their midst.
But the use of concrete language in preaching does not come easy to the missionaries. Therefore, preachers must immerse themselves by taking time to go to the people, live among them, share their lives and learn their language including imageries, metaphors, and stories that have significant value for them. Their choice of words, especially with imageries and metaphors, shows appropriate concern for the effective proclamation of the gospel.

Even To Our Graying Years: Faithfulness and Renewal In An Aging Church

Author
Jeffrey Colarossi D.Min.
Abstract
My Project in Ministry has begun a conversation that will, with God’s help, work toward the renewal of an aging congregation, Westwood First Presbyterian Church, offering a pastoral care plan to calm members’ anxiety and fear over the challenges threatening the church, and an action plan necessary for the church to be able to live faithfully, into a hopeful future, trusting in God. Engaging Biblical texts, Reformed Polity, the Spirituality of Aging, and key theologies––Practical, Vocation, Discipleship and Life-Long Learning––the project offers the church a clear vision for the future and a tangible plan to organize, energize and engage the congregation. The implementation of the project, involving the Worship and Christian Education ministries of the church, as well as the qualitative social research methodologies of self-report questionnaires and guided interviews, enabled the project to clearly communicate that vision and plan, and convey the sense of validation needed to establish participants trust, so crucial to the success of the project. The enthusiastic response, participation and support of the church throughout the process––particularly its leadership––offers a sense of confidence that the conversation will continue well into the future.

CONGREGATIONAL DIVERSITY AS A SPIRITUAL STRENGTH: RECOGNIZING OUR COMMON IDENTITY IN CHRIST IN THE BIBLICAL METANARRATIVE

Author
David Kosobucki D.Min.
Abstract
The purpose of this research is to gauge the appreciation for diversity in the congregation of Horizon Christian Fellowship Central as a spiritual strength, based upon a common identity in Christ as expressed through the biblical metanarrative. The church in question is based near downtown Indianapolis. It is diverse from the standpoint of ethnicity or race as well as socioeconomically, meaning a full spectrum of class, income and educational levels are represented. It is also multigenerational, displaying an age range from high school students that come from the neighborhood without their parents to the elderly. Nonetheless, there are under 100 adults that attend on a typical Sunday, meaning this variety of people interacts on a constant basis.

The author delivered a fourteen-part series of teachings that went through the Bible from beginning to end. Seven messages came from the Old Testament and seven more from the New. These messages explored the themes of unity, diversity and our identity in Christ. The author concurrently led three rounds of focus groups consisting of three groups each, which met in homes to discuss the above themes as they appear throughout the Bible. Groups met before, during and after the teaching series.

In the focus groups, the church displayed an appreciation for the theme of diversity as it appears in the Bible. They seemed reluctant to speak in terms of the biblical metanarrative, though they saw the metanarrative as the foundation for their identity in Christ. They accepted this as their primary personal identity and something they shared with one another. Further, this congregation valued its own diversity, believing that it equipped them to relate and reach out to a greater variety of people. These views were reinforced rather than initiated by the teaching series, meaning people already held the views.

An assessment of the benefits for the church congregation of Highland Baptist Tabernacle of Blue Ridge, Georgia in strategic, long-term sermon planning through the book of Hebrews

Author
Jerry R Thomas
Abstract
When a man that God commissions begins to preach, he may approach the sermon in many ways, but the goal is always the same: for the preacher and the listener alike to hear the words of God. Each strategy has its benefits and losses, but all strategies must lead to the pinnacle of hearing God's word. This research will investigate the benefits for the church congregation at Highland Baptist Tabernacle of strategic, long-term sermon planning through the Book of Hebrews. The motivation behind the research is to determine whether strategic, long-term sermon planning benefits this local church congregation in the areas of biblical understanding, spiritual conviction, and Christian living. If this strategy for sermon planning is highly beneficial, it could be likened to that of a strenuous climb up the mountain-difficult but well worth the effort. Not only will this research be a determining model for our local congregation, it also could give insight into the effects of intentional long-term sermon planning for expository preaching in small, rural churches throughout the country.

Preaching kingdom hope: a model for text-driven preaching from Revelation 20-22 for Korean churches

Author
Yeonjae Kim
Abstract
This dissertation presents a model from Revelation 20-22 for text-driven preaching to aid Korean churches to preach kingdom hope. The writer has developed the sermons of Criswell and Vines as a model so that preachers of Korean churches can preach correct kingdom hope from the pulpit and that from the preaching, believers will not be deceived by the erroneous eschatology of cults and be led to have biblical hope in heaven. The writer studied for the preachers of Korean churches to have a definite hope in the kingdom as they preach so that believers will prepare for the last days and live evangelistic lives.

Implementing a theme-based approach for text-driven preaching: Matthew's gospel a test case

Author
Gary Henry Everett
Abstract
This dissertation offers a theme-based approach for crafting exegetical studies into a cohesive, text-driven, expository sermon series. Such cohesion enables the preacher to avoid the danger of fragmentation. The gospel of Matthew is chosen as a test case to demonstrate how a theme-based approach to the Scriptures facilitates the identification of a book's literary structure and central ideas of the text. This approach to the biblical text reveals Matthew's theological framework. Because this framework exposes the central ideas of a book's literary structure, it aids in sermon preparation. This approach bridges the gap between exegesis and homiletics.

Preaching miracle stories of the gospels in Chinese-Indonesian context

Author
Andri Kosasih
Abstract
This thesis-project addresses how to prepare and preach the miracle stories of the gospels. The end product of this project is a manual that can be used by seminary students, by pastors wishing to enhance their preaching proficiency, and by teachers of homiletics who want to teach the skills needed to prepare relevant miracle stories sermons, especially in Chinese-Indonesian context. The second section of this thesis-project addresses the theological framework of miracle stories of the gospels. The third section addresses the literature reviews. The fourth section of the thesis-project is the manual itself, which addresses the practical concerns of how to prepare and deliver miracle stories of the gospels sermons. The manual found in section four is based on the principles of expository preaching developed by Haddon W. Robinson in his book Biblical preaching. His work is combined with other works in biblical and homiletical studies.

Holistic emerging preaching: measuring the impact of a twelve-week sermon series from the book of James on emerging worshipers' heads, hearts, and hands

Author
Matthew G Melton
Abstract
This project studied preaching as a motivator toward social action. It asked if an expository sermon series taught to emerging worshipers on the biblical book of James would result in an increase in head knowledge, heart desire to serve others, and participants taking part in community service projects. The results were not statistically significant.
Subscribe to Bible--New Testament--Homiletic use