Bible--James

Impact of Spiritual Counseling for African American Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

Author
R. Lorraine Brown D.Min.
Abstract
The author researched how African Americans, age 18-28, who received care for sickle cell disease (SCD), were impacted by intentional sharing of clinic-based spiritual counseling. This spiritual intervention addressed the often unspoken concerns of this population. Understanding spirituality, while managing the many facets of SCD, is vital for holistic health. Participants found themselves at critical junctures in their spiritual development - seeking, exploring, even questioning - how spirituality plays a role in their overall well-being. The project collected both qualitative and quantitative data through a chaplain interventionist. The chaplain met 1:1 with participants to share strategies for increasing everyday coping and self-efficacy. The participants found spiritual care to be necessary and helpful as they navigated their daily lives and sickle cell disease. The author came to realize to truly be effective, an in-depth longitudinal study is needed for true impact.

Impact of Spiritual Counseling for African American Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

Author
R. Lorraine Brown M.Div.
Abstract
The author researched how African Americans, age 18-28, who received care for sickle cell disease were impacted by intentional sharing of clinic-based spiritual counseling. This spiritual intervention addressed the often-unspoken concerns of this population. Understanding spirituality, while managing the many facets of SCD, is vital for holistic health. Participants found themselves at critical junctures in their spiritual development -- seeking, exploring, even questioning -- how spirituality plays a role in their overall well-being. The project collected both qualitative and quantitative data through a chaplain interventionist. The chaplain met 1:1 with participants to share strategies for increasing everyday coping and self-efficacy. The participants found spiritual care to be necessary and helpful as they navigated their daily lives and sickle cell disease. The author came to realize to truly be effective, an in-depth longitudinal study is needed for true impact.

Helping People to Experience Spiritual Healing of Painful Life Experiences

Author
Brian Smilde D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry Major Project was intended to assess the extent to which people experience spiritual healing of past wounds through a series of small group gatherings focused on teaching and experiencing the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ.

The project began with identifying the biblical and theological foundation for Jesus healing people from their wounds—not only physical but also emotional or spiritual. Then examining what people in other disciplines—such as social science, counseling, and business—also think, believe and teach about healing or restoration from past wounds.

The intervention involved a small group of six participants experiencing a series of eight small group gatherings. They filled out a Pre-Group and Post-Group Questionnaire. After five small group gatherings of teaching, experiencing and praying, there were two Focus Groups which allowed the participants to share feedback about what they learned, experienced and thought.

The data from the two Questionnaires and the Focus Groups was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of these small group gatherings to lead participants toward the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ. The result of this analysis was that participants were helped to identify past wounds or traumas, they felt safe to share honestly and vulnerably with the other group participants, they felt that others responded with grace and empathy, and they reflectively and personally applied the teaching in ways that allowed them to experience Jesus release them from past pain.

BREAKING FREE FROM PERSONALITY-DRIVEN MINISTRY

Author
Steve Tomlinson D.Min.
Abstract
This major project, Breaking Free from Personality-Driven Ministry, investigates the tendency of pastors of evangelical churches to develop a cult of personality around their ministry. The project considers the biblical mandate to pursue humility, exegeting both narrative and didactic passages from the New and Old Testament, and then considers secular and Christian literature on the topic of humility and leadership. The field research includes qualitative and quantitative data seeking the perspectives of both clergy and lay leaders on what effective, humble leadership should look like and evaluates the responses in light of the biblical material and literature studied. The conclusion of the project is that humble, non-personality-driven church ministry is not only possible but should be pursued in a context of team leadership, accountability, and personal disciplines. Central to the project's findings is the need for a leader to nurture and pursue a gospel-focused vision.

Pray for reign : the eschatological Elijah in James 5:17-18

Author
James Marion Darlack
Abstract
James uses the prophet Elijah as an example of righteous prayer. This thesis explores the possibility that James may have intended his readers to recognize both historical and eschatological imagery associated with the biblical prophet. First, it shows that in early Jewish literature the eschatological and historical Elijah traditions were not held in isolation of each other. Imagery from descriptions of Elijah’s eschatological return is used to describe the pre-ascension ministry of the prophet, while the eschatological mission of the prophet is described using elements of the historical narrative. Second, the thesis demonstrates that James’ prescript “to the twelve tribes of the Dispersion,” sets a tone of inaugurated and yet-to-be-consumated eschatology, and that the mention of Elijah helps form an eschatological inclusio that frames the letter. Third, the New Testament use use of Elijah’s drought outside of James is explored showing again that elements from the Elijah’s drought in 1 Kings were used in eschatological contexts, and that Elijah’s three and a half year drought, as mentioned by James, is used to illustrate a period of judgment for the sake of effecting repentance in these contexts. Fourth and finally, the images of rain and drought are viewed through an eschatological lens, revealing their role as covenant blessing and curse, and eschatological judgment and restoration. It is concluded that James’ readers could have recognized the eschatological implications of using Elijah as an example of faithful, righteous prayer, and that James assigns his readers a role similar to that of the eschatological prophet. They are called to endure in the midst of eschatological trials and to effect repentance before the arrival of the soon-coming King.

Developing and evaluating the transformative capacities model to cultivate awareness and facilitate practices of faithful presence at Mount Hamilton Baptist Church

Author
Dallas Bernhard Friesen
Abstract
This research project introduces and develops a spiritual transformation model called the Transformative Capacities Model. The heuristic model was developed using the methodology of action research with four participation groups at Mount Hamilton Baptist Church to cultivate awareness and facilitate practices of faithful presence. The model is based on Epistle of James, the life of Jesus and adapts David Kolb's experiential learning paradigm. Data collection tools included: a questionnaire, interviews, and journal logs. This project demonstrates that the Transformative Capacities Model has the potential to be an effective way to cultivate awareness and facilitate practices of spiritual transformation.

Holistic emerging preaching: measuring the impact of a twelve-week sermon series from the book of James on emerging worshipers' heads, hearts, and hands

Author
Matthew G Melton
Abstract
This project studied preaching as a motivator toward social action. It asked if an expository sermon series taught to emerging worshipers on the biblical book of James would result in an increase in head knowledge, heart desire to serve others, and participants taking part in community service projects. The results were not statistically significant.

Anointing the sick: a parish pastor poses questions of James 5:14-16

Author
K Roy Nilson
Abstract
This project proposes that anointing of the sick, as prescribed in James 5:14-16, should become a part of Christian ministry to the sick. From exegesis of this text the project discusses the person who ministers, the process of ministry (anointing with oil and prayer), the prognosis of ministry (saving and healing), and patients who should receive this ministry. The meaning of anointing the sick, its nonsacramental nature, the action-vocabulary of the church, and issues of pastoral implementation are essential parts of the required catechetical task of preparation for anointing the sick.
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