Bible--Galatians

Helping People to Experience Spiritual Healing of Painful Life Experiences

Author
Brian Smilde D.Min.
Abstract
This Doctor of Ministry Major Project was intended to assess the extent to which people experience spiritual healing of past wounds through a series of small group gatherings focused on teaching and experiencing the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ.

The project began with identifying the biblical and theological foundation for Jesus healing people from their wounds—not only physical but also emotional or spiritual. Then examining what people in other disciplines—such as social science, counseling, and business—also think, believe and teach about healing or restoration from past wounds.

The intervention involved a small group of six participants experiencing a series of eight small group gatherings. They filled out a Pre-Group and Post-Group Questionnaire. After five small group gatherings of teaching, experiencing and praying, there were two Focus Groups which allowed the participants to share feedback about what they learned, experienced and thought.

The data from the two Questionnaires and the Focus Groups was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of these small group gatherings to lead participants toward the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ. The result of this analysis was that participants were helped to identify past wounds or traumas, they felt safe to share honestly and vulnerably with the other group participants, they felt that others responded with grace and empathy, and they reflectively and personally applied the teaching in ways that allowed them to experience Jesus release them from past pain.

The Baptized Community: Community Formation as Seen through Anglican Baptismal Ecclesiology
and the Liturgical Practice of Morning Prayer

Author
Kyle Norman D.Min.
Abstract
Beginning with The Book of Common Prayer, the first version of which was published in 1549, Anglicans have mediated their spirituality through participation in a common spiritual life. This is to say, formation toward Christlikeness is not to be understood as an individualized process whereby the individual grows in Christlikeness in an isolated and privatized manner. Rather, formation toward Christlikeness is a Spirit-led process that primarily occurs within the community of faith. The baptismal community is the very context of Christlike formation. This portfolio looks at communal formation through three, integrated components. Firstly, communal formation, along with its various components and nuances, will be described through an appeal to the Anglican baptismal liturgy. Secondly, scenes from the author’s own autobiography will serve to illustrate how communal formation may be practically experienced. Lastly, the author’s own research into the practice of Morning Prayer will highlight the importance of shared liturgy within communal formation. The portfolio argues that one is not formed individually, rather one is called to participate in the formation of the community. This is seen as occurring through immersion in shared liturgy, embodied action, and evangelistic mission.

The impact of the encounter: revival in the sanctifying power of God

Author
C L Simmons
Abstract
The project's objective is to briefly identify revival as it related to holiness and then give biblical and theological evidence that supports the characteristics of genuine restoration. In Exodus it will be established that encountering the divine presence resulted in positional holiness. In the book of Leviticus this writer will identify the holiness of God's people in terms of their ethics, morals, lifestyles, etc. In Galatians there will be exploration in our new found position of relationship with Christ. From Galatians the writer will look at the life of Wesley and his theology concerning experience of the work of the spirit in the heart.

A study of expository preaching of the Pauline epistles -- using Galatians as an example

Author
Sheung Chi Ko
Abstract
The author conducted the study of expository preaching of the Pauline Epistles in four areas. In the first area, he studied the definition of exegesis and expository preaching. In the second area, he studied the exegesis of the Pauline Epistles, with examples given from the Epistle to Galatians. In the fourth area, he prepared a completed expository sermon from a passage if the Epislte to Galatians.
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