Small groups

The Effect of Preaching God's Mission in the Workplace

Author
Joseph Warrington D.Min.
Abstract
Thesis: A twelve week sermon series on God's mission would change the attitude (feeling) and practice (frequency) of mission in the workplace of members of Grace Church.
Research method: A mixed methods approach that utilized two open set surveys as well as participation in staggered focus groups, and interviews all designed to determine the defectiveness of the intervention.
The conclusion reached in the study conformed the intervention increased the participant's attitude (feelings) towards God's mission in the workplace. It also confirmed that the intervention increased the behavior (frequency) of the participant's in activities that promote God's mission in the workplace.

THE DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN EIGHT-WEEK, SMALL GROUP-BASED BIBLE STUDY COURSE FOR MARRIED COUPLES SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO STRENGTHEN THE MARRIAGE RELATIONSHIP

Author
David Alan Shaffer D.Min.
Abstract
This project seeks to answer the research question, “Does an eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants?” Today’s most effective marriage programs focus on important themes relevant to marriage and include transparency, a biblical foundation, and gentle accountability. Still, the question follows, “What comes next to further strengthen marriages?” This project answers this question with a process-based Bible study that, because of its design, strengthens the marriage relationship with improved communication, conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction (the three measures of this project). This methodology includes weekly individual study, couple discussion, and small group interaction.
Through the use of pre- and post-course surveys, the couples who participated in a study of Galatians provided ample quantitative research that yielded group, couples, and gender statistics. The couples’ data was measured by Positive Couple Agreement (PCA), which identifies couples’ responses as a relational strength when they choose the same response or are within one choice of each other (4 [agree] or 5 [strongly agree] on a positively worded statement, 2 [disagree] or 1 [strongly disagree] on a negatively worded statement).
The researcher designed Galatians: True Freedom – A Small Group Study for Couples to implement the new methodology to be evaluated. The quantitative data based on the pre- and post-course surveys provided the means to prove whether the three measures strengthened the marriages of the participating couples. The data supports the veracity of all three hypotheses (improved communication, improved conflict resolution, and increased overall marital satisfaction), showing strong growth in each measure, most notably with communication. These results led to the research conclusion: Yes, the methodology used in this eight-week, small group-based Bible study course for married couples developed for this applied research project did strengthen the marriage relationships of its participants.

Practicing faith together : Messy Church and disciple formation

Author
Johannah G. Myers
Abstract
How can the foundation of Messy Church be used to create discipleship groups where all ages practice faith together at Aldersgate United Methodist Church? In order to make disciples, churches must create space for all ages to apprentice faith together. The author engaged educational theories and Jesus' own example, specifically researching apprenticeship as a model for learning faith. The author developed intergenerational small groups using the values and model of Messy Church. The project suggests that Messy Church provides a solid foundation for creating space for all ages to practice faith together.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Intergenerational faith education through death and preparation education

Author
Seongyong Lee
Abstract
Death is a place where everything appears. No one can hide before death or demonstrate oneself. Hence, it may be more fearful. In the present age, we try to forget the word, death. Christianity, however, has constantly been speaking of beating death, and even more so than victory, it has been talking about the work bearing new fruit through death. The modern church has told such words of salvation but has not accepted into its heart – where a place to accept faith. The author tries to find the following in his ministry setting: the reason why we must think of death, a new perspective of seeing death, experiences facing death, a life of self-denying and carrying one’s cross through participation in death, and the biblical teachings of productive death as a grain of wheat falls into the earth, dies, and bears much fruit.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

A study on the worship to form Christian faith and fellowship in military church : focused on symbols-participation-communication worship

Author
Joo Song Kim
Abstract
While serving at his church, the author discovered three problems commonly found in military churches, which are the loss of the experience of grace, lack of deep fellowship, and misunderstanding of the gospel. The author proposes that encouraging participation and communication using small groups and religious symbols would alleviate these problems within the military church. Therefore, the author attempted a six-week worship project using the four elements of early church worship as a basis. Five symbols were used as key parts of the worship to encourage independent participation and immersion during worship.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

A study in the renewal of the class meeting : by the prayer school and the Bible reading

Author
Jae-poong Kim
Abstract
In the midst of keeping an eye on the Class Meeting - though given as the crucial means of grace within the Methodist Church - being increasingly formalized and fossilized, this researcher came to reach a keen awareness of the necessity for their renewal. Accordingly, on the theological basis of the Class Meeting - as little churches in a church, in its relation to Methodist Connectionalism, and as the means of grace - this research was committed to an attempt to renew the Class Meeting - namely, the prudential means of grace - by searching the Scripture and prayer, which are Wesley’s instituted means of grace, along with its application to the Class Meeting within Sillim First Methodist Church. As the result, it was found that renewal of the Class Meeting actually took place and participating members of the church experienced God’s grace in the Class Meeting and achieved spiritual growth by New Testament Reading and Prayer School Project.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

The theological, personal and pastoral identity of the military chaplain

Author
Anthony J. Hunley
Abstract
Cultivating and sustaining one’s theological, personal, and pastoral identity while serving in the religiously and culturally diverse environment of the military is critical to the success of the mission and the chaplain. Utilizing John Wesley’s Class Meeting model, the author constituted a provisional Chaplain Covenant Group as one tool to support chaplains in their identity efforts. This Project Paper shares the foundations and story of that group; along with recommendations for implementation of this successful initiative as other military chaplains seek to defend themselves against spiritual warfare, bolster their identity, and live out their calling to serve God and country.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Ellsworth Human Performance Team : utilizing Jesus' sending of the disciples to better care for airmen

Author
Ronald L. Feeser Jr.
Abstract
This paper researched the applicability of Jesus' method of sending disciples out in pairs to the outreach utilized by Helping Agencies in the United States Air Force. The author examined the theology and practicality of establishing a local Human Performance Team. This construct changed the outreach to better reach and care for Airmen. Analysis suggests that this method positively affected the ability of agencies to support members and be responsive to crises. Additionally, it indicates that the application of this model has a positive effect on the community by reducing the overall number of crisis and emergency counseling sessions.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Changing Attitudes Toward Life : Using Viktor E. Frankl's Logotherapy in Ministry with Christian Women in Church of the Lord, Anyang, Kyounggi-do, South Korea

Author
Jihye Kim
Abstract
Changing Attitudes Toward Life: Using Viktor E. Frankl’s Logotherapy in Ministry with Christian Women in Church of the Lord, Anyang, Kyounggi-do, South Korea is a project designed to help the target group increase the degree of meaning and purpose in life and motivate a desire to live lives more meaningfully and responsibly with hopeful attitudes by exploring the biblical messages with integration exercises utilizing the key concepts of Dr. Frankl’s Logotherapy. Through a five-week sermon series, six weeks of group sessions including the final group reflection session, and writing reflection and autobiographies, the participants are provided opportunities to evaluate and even revise their values, meaning, and life-styles. Using quantitative and qualitative instruments, results show that educative pastoral counseling along with reflection in a small group setting can effect significant positive changes in their attitudes and behavior.

A PILOT PROGRAM OF SERMON-BASED COMMUNITY GROUPS FOR INTER-CITY BAPTIST CHURCH

Author
Daniel Winnberg D.Min.
Abstract
This project was a pilot program for adults to engage in sermon-based community groups. The goal of the project was not to define a long-term plan, but rather learn lessons for a potential future implementation of sermon-based community groups incorporated as a part of the shepherding strategy for the pastoral staff of Inter-City Baptist Church in Allen Park, Michigan.

The genesis of the project began at The Church of the Open Bible in Burlington, Massachusetts, where I served as pastor along with fellow elders. We discussed different strategies to aid us in shepherding the believers in God in our assembly, including practical steps to disciple one another. After a few small-group book studies and trial sermon-based groups were completed, it was decided to pursue a pilot program for sermon-based community groups. After having resigned as pastor there, I was afforded the opportunity to complete the project at Inter-City Baptist Church, where I served previously on pastoral staff. The project was completed with three groups: one that met on Sunday evening, a men's only group on Monday morning, and a third on Wednesday evening.

This project surveyed some biblical theological principles as a basis for sermon-based community groups. The project also surveyed some current key literature on the topic of small groups in general and sermon-based groups in particular.

The project concluded with an evaluation meeting with the pastoral staff. A good discussion took place on how the pilot program was executed, evaluation of the benefits of such a program, and a few options to be evaluated for potential future implementation in the life of the church.
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