Church work with women

Intergenerational women's ministry : encouraging and building each other up

Author
Lisa F. Turner
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how church directors of women’s ministry (DWM) create intergenerational programs for women. If DWM are equipped to plan intergenerational programs, they will be able to contribute in greater ways to the church’s overall mission.
The study employed a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with six directors of women’s ministry who lead an intergenerational women’s ministry. Four research questions guided this study: What planning process do DWM use to create intergenerational programs for women? What are the outcomes for which DWM create intergenerational programs for women? What challenges do DWM face in creating intergenerational programs for women? What leadership strategies do DWM employ to navigate the challenges of creating intergenerational programs for women?
The literature review focused on three areas related to the Biblical framework of relationships, intergenerational worldview differences, and leadership agility. The literature, the research questions, and the data are inseparable throughout the study. They are woven together in this exploration of creating intergenerational programs where women of all ages can build meaningful relationships and grow spiritually.
The study found that it is extremely important to have an intergenerational leadership team in order to create an intergenerational ministry. A surprising finding was the criteria some DWM use to measure success. Rather than utilizing attendance as the measure, one used how many women were involved in making the event happen. The study also found three major challenges that DWM must overcome when creating an intergenerational ministry: resistance to change, technology, and competition with other women’s ministries. Another finding was that leadership agility is a necessity for DWM because in today’s world change is inevitable and they must be ready to adapt to the unexpected. The study concluded with practical suggestions and recommendations.

Sanctuary in community : principles for building sanctuary in community for persons affected by gender based violence

Author
Debra Ann Schout
Abstract
Rural Bangladesh has been my ministry setting for the past twelve years. The culture is rich and colorful, but also often institutionalizes practices of gender based violence. My desire is to establish experiences of sanctuary in community, offering a safe alternative to the violence and a place where people can encounter the glory of God. After exploring the biblical theology of sanctuary, chaplaincy staff at our mission and I designed a visual model to communicate the concepts. Through Bible studies and discussions with chaplains and adolescent girls, we explored the usefulness of the theology of sanctuary in crisis intervention and in prevention of violence. This information helped to inform continued exploration of what it meant to feel "safe" amid experiences of gender based violence. We interviewed the founders of a shelter for women who were experiencing violence, the women in the shelter, and women who had transitioned from the shelter back into community along with their family members. The findings suggest principles for ministry groups who wish to establish experiences of sanctuary in community for those involved in gender based violence. The principles are standards which can be applied in a variety of ministry settings and give direction for effective practice of sanctuary in community.

Narrative inquiry allowed for hearing the stories of the shelter founders, women, and their family members first hand. Open ended questioning and listening allowed their stories to be told/ heard without over imposing specific direction or bias. Valuing their stories is a first step in valuing the abused for the gifted people they are- already offering a contrast to the objectification they have experienced in the past. It is my hope and belief that the principles can be applied and help inform other ministry groups in providing alternatives to the violence.

Sexual Shame in Women and How to Experience Freedom

Author
Joy Pedrow Skarka D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
This research project explores how Christian women have experienced sexual shame and how they have experienced freedom. Two surveys were created to explore the research question. The first survey was quantitative and was completed by 1,090 Christian women. Those who were 31–40 years old made up the majority at 30.73 percent, followed by those 23–30 years old who made up 30.46 percent. The second survey was qualitative and was completed by 44 Christian women. Of this number, 38.64 percent were 23–30 years old.

Two surveys designed by the researcher gathered both quantitative and qualitative responses with both closed and open-ended questions. The qualitative survey allowed women’s voices to be heard and their challenges to be known in regard to the sexual shame they have experienced. The quantitative survey provided statistics to prove that women struggle with sexual shame and show how they have found healing. The surveys asked questions about the woman’s life as a Christian, self-worth, and experience with sexual shame. These questions explored correlation of involvement in Christian activities with levels of freedom from shame. The questions also examined what experiences and factors caused women to experience sexual shame and what non-biblical sources and biblical sources led to freedom from sexual shame.

The survey results aligned with the three hypotheses to reveal that Christian women identified understanding the love and grace of God, being known in biblical community, and learning a biblical teaching of sexuality as three contributors to finding freedom from sexual shame.

An Analysis of the Biblical and Social View of Evangelical Adult Christian Women’s Self-Worth

Author
Maggie Rodriguez D.Ed.Min.
Abstract
This research project sought to analyze the biblical and social view of evangelical adult Christian women’s worth. A descriptive survey was designed to reveal reasons why evangelical adult Christian women struggle with their sense of self-worth. Hispanic, African American, Asian, and Anglo women provided valuable information regarding each group’s self-worth with respect to their family of origin, cultural background, community variables, and traumatic experiences.

The survey was designed by the researcher and generated a 78% response rate from 604 women. The results of the survey revealed that evangelical adult Christian women struggle with their self-worth and value. The study proved all four of its hypotheses to be true—that an evangelical adult Christian woman’s self-worth can be negatively influenced by her family of origin, culture, community, and past traumatic experiences.

In contrast, research, biblical examples, and survey responses support the truth that God created women in His image and that they reflect the “Imago Dei.”

Enhanced women's leadership in Maasai churches by the Bible Women Training in Longido District in Tanzania

Author
Kyung Sik Bae
Abstract
"The purpose of this project is to burgeon women's leadership of Maasai in the ten churches established in Longido district in Tanzania. Women's leadership plays a pivotal role in the evangelization of Maasai. I would refer this model to the Bible Women that is manifested in the history of World Mission, especially in the early days of the Korean Mission era, which has a powerful effect in the mission field. Most women in Africa are reduced in the value of women by the male-dominated cultural patterns. Furthermore, women of Maasai are limited to pregnancy, childbirth, and nurturing by the idiosyncratic social status and role established by traditional culture. Due to this influence of African culture, women's role is reduced even in the church and is regarded as less important than men. Just as the sex ratio of all churches in the world is much more women, Maasai churches in Longido are filled with women, and the women sustain the church. This project uncovers that Maasai women are restoring the image of God through which they are constructing the women's role in the church as well as in the community." -- Leaf [2].

Equipping Selected Women at Suburban Baptist Church, New Orleans, Louisiana, with Essential Multicultural Discipleship Skills

Author
Stephanie A Golden Friend
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to develop and quipping model to provide selected women at Suburban Baptist Church, New Orleans, Louisiana, with essential multicultural discipleship skills. The project director researched the field of discipleship to determine discipleship methodologies and essential skills practiced by women's ministry leaders in multicultural churches. Information from this research was used to develop the curriculum for a seminar presented at Suburban Baptist Church to equip participants with essential skills to disciple women of other cultures. The seminar consisted of four ninety-minute sessions encompassing two consecutive Saturdays. The concepts developed in this project can be adapted as a guide for discipleship in multicultural women's ministry by other churches, associations, or state conventions.

Prophetic Preaching in the Face of Socioeconomic Crisis as a Justice Instrument in Favor of Women in Puerto Rico

Author
Enid Medina Torres D.Min.
Abstract
La Predicación Profética ante la Crisis Socioeconómica como Instrumento de Justicia para la Mujer en Puerto Rico

This paper presents research on how prophetic preaching can become a justice instrument in favor of women in Puerto Rico facing a significant socioeconomic crisis, with the purpose of it to lead social transformation and liberate women. God has called the Church to raise its voice for all those oppressed by power structures. particularly women, who I consider are the most oppressed. This project can become a significant contribution to prophetic preaching, as it convenes the Church to raise its voice against systemic oppression. Prophetic preaching is presented as an effective tool for a better Puerto Rico here and now. It is by means of prophetic preaching that the Church can become an active agent in fulfilling God’s mission and bringing about His kingdom.
This research followed a qualitative approach, using individual interviews with open-ended questions, as well as a four-sermon series. Six people from the local church participated as part of a focus group who supported the sermon preparation as well as their assessment. Results in this research showed inductive sermonary structures contribute to the process of Church members to not only recognize socioeconomic problems women face on a daily basis, but also to also feel compelled to work against them, guiding them to present concrete ideas in favor of socioeconomic justice for women.

Empowerment through storytelling : the story of the patriarch Jacob as a life-transforming experience for women

Author
Elena Melnikova
Abstract
The project responds to women’s hesitance to accept leadership in church regardless of numerous examples found in Methodist heritage. Data analyses indicated that women need empowerment coming from a Bible story interpretation, its personal appropriation and self-awareness gained through sharing stories. The author wrote from the pluralistic ministry perspective and used feminist theology and the Old Testament story of the patriarch Jacob to empower women through storytelling to take on leadership in ministry. The project curriculum addressed questions of calling, promise, growth, conversion and maturation, and could be widely applied in the church and seminary education.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

The Role of the Roman Catholic Catechists in Shaping Adolescents Equipped to Address De-Womanization in Igbo Culture of Nigeria

Author
VIRGINUS Onyekachi OSUAGWU D.Min.
Abstract
This thesis-project explores to what extent the effective training/formation in transformative catechesis for Roman Catholic catechists of South Eastern Nigeria can equip them to form male and female adolescents who can contribute to building respect and upholding the dignity of Igbo women. It is intended to be a contribution to the conversation about social justice in the Igbo Roman Catholic Church, with regard to respecting the dignity of every human being, especially women.
The author employs the praxis-theory-praxis approach of practical theology in situating what effective social justice training/formation of Igbo catechists could mean within their unique ecclesial, social and cultural contexts around the theme of discipleship. The author concludes that effective training/formation of Igbo catechists in transformative catechesis (discipleship, witnessing, social justice) is key to the transformation of Igbo adolescents, the Igbo Roman Catholic Church and ultimately, the Igbo culture.

An Impact Study About the Effects of Unprocessed Trauma

Author
Pamela D Nelson
Abstract
An Impact Study About the Effects of Unprocessed Trauma:
The purpose of this project was to impact the understanding of unprocessed trauma by using an eight week formational prayer model at City Covenant Church in Detroit, Michigan. The project included a quantitative and qualitative pre-test, post-test design that measured the participants' understanding of the effects of unprocessed trauma.
As a results of this study, participants increased in their knowledge about common triggers to past experiences. Participants demonstrated an increased understanding in their ability to process a previous trauma experience, and participants developed an awareness about how trauma interferes with a relationship to God.
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