Church and community

All for the best : theatre as a community building and disciple making ministry through process over performance

Author
Kyle Durbin
Abstract
While the majority of emphasis given to theatre ministry is based on its capacity to deliver faithful entertainment, theatre ministry is more effective as a means of disciplemaking through the production process. Based, in part, on thorough analysis of the establishment of a new theatre ministry, Frostburg Theatre Company, at Frostburg UMC, and specifically through a production of “Godspell,” the author seeks to prove that theatre ministry is most effective in focusing on the production process rather than the final presentation as evangelism or entertainment.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Healing the people, healing the land : developing a vision for a High Street Monastery in St. Patrick's Church of Ireland, Coleraine

Author
Roger Cooke
Abstract
This paper seeks to address the issue of conflict transformation by offering a credible process for healing the wounded history of both a congregation, and the land it occupies, through the development of a well-defined process of reconciliation and the implementation of a Christian Day of Atonement. Having addressed the issue of ‘healing the people and healing the land’, the author goes on to tentatively outline a vision for the development of a High Street Monastery - a place of prayer, worship and radical community engagement - within the ancient Church of Ireland parish of St. Patrick’s, Coleraine.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Integrating spirituality and health in an urban setting

Author
William E. Coleman Jr.
Abstract
This project is a collection of writings and discussions by Biblical scholars, scriptural support, testimonies and practices that develop a blueprint for integrating spirituality, religion and health; and can be a tool for other churches to use when starting and sustaining a health and wholeness ministry as a way for both sanctification and community outreach. It is a redirecting of the course Jesus declared for the continuous journey of faith, health and community. This author shares journals written about the lack of trust the African American culture had about doctors and hospitals dating back to slavery.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Exploring the DNA of Oxon Hill United Methodist Church : and its impact on the church's ability to live a missional existence

Author
Patricia Allen
Abstract
The author explored the relational impact of local community and church history on the congregation, the decision making processes of the church, and the possibility of reimagining and repurposing these influences for the manifestation of biblical community. The author conducted a book review, facilitated a spiritual gifts inventory, led a bible study, and engaged a pastoral leadership assessment tool to assess the ability of the church to identify historical influences and potential opportunities for new understanding. The analysis of the responses gleaned from these experiences is the church's deeply entrenched understanding of community cannot easily be reimagined for different results.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

Shuttered factories, scattered faithful : a third generation study of Gastonia and the confluence of faith, poverty, race, class, textile manufacturing, and union organizing in the new South

Author
Laura Alexander-Elliott
Abstract
Following on from Millhands & Preachers (Yale Divinity) and Spindles & Spires (Union Seminary), two religious academic works that studied Gastonia, N.C., in previous sequential generations, the author examines the relationship between the faith community and disappearing textile industry through the lens of her hometown, which once boasted the largest concentration of Southern cotton mills--businesses that built and sustained churches. She incorporates issues of economics, labor, class, and race, and--utilizing dozens of local interviews and surveys--documents the missions role congregations and faith-based nonprofits play today when both manufacturing and the mainline church have been in decline.

[Note about entry: Abstract submitted to the Atla RIM database on behalf of the author. The text appears in its entirety as it does in the original abstract page of the author’s project paper. Neither words nor content have been edited.]

"Lessons of Hospitality in the Parables of Jesus: Inspiring a Congregation to Transform Its Ways of Loving and Serving Neighbors"

Author
Joan Warren Gandy D.Min.
Abstract
This project proposes that lessons of hospitality in the parables of Jesus can inspire a congregation to transform its ways of loving and serving neighbors. The congregation took part in an eight-week study with multiple opportunities to engage the parables each week. Research methods included ethnographic practices of listening, observing, and reading historical documents; written surveys to gauge how participants viewed congregational hospitality and service to neighbors before and after the study; and practical theological methods such as reflection/action and the four tasks of practical theological interpretation. The research discloses the power of parables to stir hearts for neighborhood mission.

A literary and historical analysis of Ephesians 5:18-6:9

Author
Shana Cress
Abstract
Within Paul’s letter to the Ephesians, there is a set of instructions termed the Haustafeln, or “household codes.” Paul turns his focus upon roles within the home. The question that inevitably arises from a text nearing 2,000 years of age is one of relevance. Do these instructions apply to those of a different time and culture? Several matters need to be examined. Previous research has linked this passage to Aristotle, to Roman culture, and to Stoic philosophy. Since the form of the Ephesians household codes is said to resemble Aristotle’s works, a reading of Aristotle’s code is necessary. Roman household characteristics that need to be explored include the pater familias, the goal of harmony, and the Roman conceptuality of adultery. Stoic philosophy will be examined through the writings of Epictetus. By closely examining his discourses, we can look for similarities or dissimilarities to Ephesians. If Paul’s goal was for Christians to blend in to the surrounding culture, then this will be evident as these subjects are investigated. In addition to this historical work, a literary analysis of Ephesians 5:18-6:9 will be performed. This thesis will argue that this passage on the household, Ephesians 5:18-6:9, is best understood against a Christian and not pagan philosophical background, situated within the epistle as a natural progression of Paul’s thought that is consistent with other Scriptural teaching.

Narratives Church: A Missional Church Planting Path for Cultivating a Unified Theological Vision

Author
Mark Miller D.Min.
Abstract
This research project focused on the development of a unified theological vision for the missional movement. The researcher conducted a thorough investigation of Scripture and current biblical material in order to discern the barriers existing within the missional movement. The researcher looked at key areas that shape the missional church planting movement: leadership development, theological interpretation of the early church, church planting methods and practice, ecclesiology, and the application and interpretation of Ephesians 4:11. Four church planting organizations participated: North American Mission Board, Acts 29 Network, Association of Related Churches, and Converge Worldwide. A questionnaire given to each movement revealed that there is indeed a disconnect from one movement to the next in terms of areas mentioned above.

A STUDY OF THE USE OF SCIENTIFIC LANGUAGE BY GEORGE MACLEOD, FOUNDER OF THE IONA COMMUNITY

“What’s the matter? … matter is the matter!”

Author
Mitchell Bunting D.Min.
Abstract
A study of George MacLeod, founder of the Iona Community, and his use of language taken from modern physics. He responds to the dropping of atom bombs in 1945 and develops theological insight into the Incarnation of Christ. His words are recalled as pithy sayings and poetic prayers often associated with in his anti-nuclear campaigning in the Church and the House of Lords. The study draws on his published works including the Iona Community magazine Coracle and the documentary film Sermon in Stone as well as interviews with Iona Community members to assess the significance of his use of such language.

Changing Church Culture among Church Leaders by Moving from Meetings to Mission

Author
Andrew J Kumpel D.Min.
Abstract
This study researched the effect of replacing church committee meetings with missional teaching and experiences of evangelism for church leaders on perceived current and preferred organizational culture. A three-moth moratorium of all official church meetings allowed the researcher to conduct five training sessions on evangelism. The researcher collected quantitative data from both control group participants and experimental group participants using a pretest and posttest model using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument. Findings revealed some changes in perception of both current and preferred organizational culture among research participants. Change in organizations is pervasive because of the degree and rapidity of change in the external environment.
Subscribe to Church and community