African American clergy

The Impact of Preaching on Church Growth: Black Churches in The North Georgia Conference of The United Methodist Church

Author
Yvette Denise Massey D.Min.
Abstract
This project addresses the question of whether good preaching can cause congregational growth. The location of the work was two Black churches in the North Georgia Conference of The United Methodist Church and included preaching a variety of sermons, followed by congregational research on the influence of the sermons on church growth. Through this project, the thesis on which this work was based, that church growth was a direct result of good preaching, changed to recognize that while preaching alone does not cause church growth, it is one of many significant factors in the decision to join a church. The project reveals that a comprehensive church system that includes elements such as preaching, outreach, nurture, Christian education, evangelism, and worship, is necessary to impact congregational growth.

Developing a mentoring strategy for African-American church planters for the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Author
Steven Beckham
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to offer a strategy that was used by church planters in the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which were primarily led by African-Americans. The strategy helped the church planter with some best practices that worked for others. The strategy model found in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Handbook was the model used to facilitate the project.

A wide range of resources were used to gain a fundamental understanding of mentoring strategy programs across a broad spectrum of denominations. The project director utilized this information to build a mentoring strategy for the Baptist Association of Greater Baton Rouge
(BAGBR) and the wide array of African-American church plants that it serves. The strategy served as a training tool to guide new African-American church plants as they evolved into healthy churches.

Preaching for Prophetic Witness Inspiring a Black Middle-Class Congregation to Engage its Marginalized Community

Author
Richard D Shaw
Abstract
Following the Civil Rights movements of the sixties, many Black preachers turned their away from prophetic preaching, and despite the critical need, chose not to preach sermons addressing social injustice during Sunday morning worship services. As a result, the Black church, in many cases, has become irrelevant on social issues that affect the communities where they are located. This thesis project addresses the requirements for preaching prophetically during Sunday morning worship to a Black, middle-class congregation, and aims to show that preaching for prophetic witness can be used as a means of inspiring a congregation that identifies itself as Black middle-class to reach out fully to its marginalized community.

Standing in the intersection equipping, resourcing, & mentoring young clergywoman of color

Author
Theresa S Thames
Abstract
This project develops an intervention that responds to the ways in which the intersectionality of age, gender, and race presents unique challenges for young clergywomen of color. The study utilizes autoethnography, literature reviews, and both qualitative and quantitative research to identify five core competencies that are necessary for young clergywomen of color to thrive: self-awareness, strategic thinking, leadership, balance, and cultivating relationships. Old Testament scripture and womanist theology provide a framework for the personal and professional development curriculum that can be utilized by seminaries, denominations, and other sources of theological education in the training of young clergywomen of color.

No Title Specified

Author
A. Williams Mondonico
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to research the field of African-American pastoral leadership in multiethnic churches in order to develop a leadership workshop for pastoral interns in The Pursuit Church Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee. The project director research a wide range of sources to gain knowledge of the best practices used by African-American pastors who lead multiethnic churches. The project director used the information to develop a worksohp that will be used at The Pursuit Church Memphis, as well as other churches, churches planting networks, North American Mission Board (NAMB), and denominations that which to plant or revitalize multiethnic churches. The project director utilizes the research model described in the current New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Project in Ministry Design Handbook to complete this project.

Homophobia in some African American Churches in the DMV

Author
Mason K Nurney
Abstract
The problem investigated was homophobia in some African American Churches (AAC) in the Washington, DC metropolitan area (DMV). The researcher used three data streams -- scriptural, contemporary and case studies -- to determine possible causes for homophobia in the AAC in the DMV. The data revealed that leaders acting on what they have been taught frame their ministry paradigms in ministering to LGBT people. These influences are deeply embedded into the culture of the AAC and the psyche of the AA pastor. From the data collected the researcher created a rubric scale of church leaders, as well as fourteen recommendations the AA pastor can use a reference guide to minister to LGBT members in their congregations.

Understanding factors thatcontribute to long-term successful pastorates among African-American pastors

Author
Wilbur D Winborne
Abstract
In our present post-modern society the days when the pastor served at one church for his or her entire career is mostly a thing of the past. Longevity in pastoral ministry is rare due to several cultural factors. First, the society of the 21st century is a fast-paced, transient culture. Second, society has evolved from an agrarian culture through the industrial revolution to an information driven technological global village. Finally, there is an increase of anxiety, burnout and spiritual warfare within the pastor's family and in the church. The research confirms the positive aspects of a successful long-term pastorate.

African American pastors as transformational servant leaders achieving theological education

Author
Juoy Logan Austin
Abstract
This project addressed the relationship between transformational servant leadership and higher education. Ministry leaders are likely to adopt the leadership style of unorthodox mentors if they have no formal theological education. Leaders nor formally trained are less likely to display transformational leadership behaviors. African American leaders were interviewed about higher education in their ministries. They were tested for a full range of leadership behaviors using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. A formal theological studies education was desired but not required by the leaders interviewed. The various reasons and the life stories that formed the participants' views were documented.

Take care with self-care: an exploratory study of intentional clergy self-care among African American women in ministry

Author
Altonnette D Hawkins
Abstract
The creation of a safe, sacred space for African-American women in ministry to share their stories encourages an inward journey of self-reflection, renewal, reconnection, and rest. This study explored intentional clergy self-care based on the researcher's PMS model of prayer, meditation and support. Using qualitative research, a face-to-face six-week study with a clergy peer group and a secondary study using an online questionnaire were conducted. The results showed that pastors experience greater stress in ministry than those in other ministry positions. On-going self-care awareness and support across geographic and denominational boundaries were factors in promoting community and sustainability.

What does the Lord require of you? African American leaders of "BUILD" reflect on Micah 6:8

Author
Amariah H McIntosh
Abstract
The question addressed by this project is to determine the influence of the vision captured in Micah 6:8 among African American leaders in BUILD, an affiliate of DART (Direct Action Research and Training Center). Specific questions sought to ascertain the influence of Micah 6:8 in one's personal faith, civic understanding, and personal relationships. The purpose of the project is to explore how scripture passages become integrated into the life of persons beyond their involvement in a particular organizational context; in other words, how scriptural passages move from theory to practical application in everyday living. In order to analyze and evaluate these leaders' own thinking, the author developed an open-ended questionnaire which enabled the participants to develop and write their own answers in an essay format.
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